Jim Miller on Politics

Last updated:
1:25 PM, 25 Septembe 2018



Jim Miller on Politics

  Email:
jimxc1 at gmail.com



What's he reading? Francis Parkman.

News Compilers
(Why These?)

A&L Daily
Drudge
Hot Air
Jewish World Review
Lucianne
Mediaite
memeorandum
*newser
Orbusmax
Rantburg
Real Clear Politics
SciTech Daily
Yahoo


Big Media
(Why These?)

Atlantic Monthly
Axios
BBC
CNN
Chosen Ilbo
Daily Mail (UK)
Deutsche Welle
Fox News
Globe and Mail (CA)
Guardian (UK)
Investor's Business Daily
Le Figaro (FR)
Le Monde (FR)
The Local (Sweden)
National Review
New York Times
The New Yorker
Politico
Seattle PI
Seattle Times
Slate
Slashdot
The Spectator (UK)
Der Spiegel
Telegraph (UK)
Times (UK)
U. S. News
USA Today
Wall Street Journal
Washington Examiner
Washington Post
Washington Times


References:

Adherents
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Census Quick Facts
Dave Leip's Election Atlas
FactCheck
Federal Statistics
How Stuff Works
NationMaster
Refdesk
Snopes
StateMaster
Tax Facts
Unionstats
Wikipedia


Smart Media
(Why These?)

*The American
The American Spectator
Michael Barone
City Journal
Commentary
FiveThirtyEight
Front Page Magazine
Michael Fumento
The Hill
Media Research
Michael Medved
New York Sun
Number Watch
PJ Media
Public Interest
Roll Call
Spinsanity
Townhall
The Weekly Standard


Blogs
(Why These?)

My Group Blog:
Sound Politics

Northwest:


Economic Freedom
Orcinus
Public Interest Transportation Forum
<pudge/*>
Northwest Progressive Institute
Seattle Bubble


Other US:


Ace of Spades HQ
Ann Althouse
American Thinker
Art Contrarian
Balloon Juice
Baseball Crank
Beldar
Bookworm Room
Chicago Boyz
Classical Values
*College Insurrection
Daily Pundit
Discriminations
Econlog
Election Law
Fausta
Flares into Darkness
Flopping Aces
The Long War Journal
Keith Hennessey
Hugh Hewitt
Instapundit
Joanne Jacobs
Jeff Jarvis
The Jawa Report
Brothers Judd
JustOneMinute
Kausfiles
Kesher Talk
Le-gal In-sur-rec-tion
Little Green Footballs
Megan McArdle
Michelle Malkin
Greg Mankiw
Marginal Revolution
Mazurland
Minding the Campus
The ModerateVoice
*The Monkey Cage Mudville Gazette
"neo-neocon"
Betsy Newmark
Newsbusters
No Watermelons Allowed
Parapundit
"Patterico"
Daniel Pipes
Polipundit
Political Arithmetik
Political Calculations
Power Line
QandO
Right Wing News
Scrappleface
Screw Loose Change
Sense of Events
Joshua Sharf
Rand Simberg
Smart Politics
The Spirit of Enterprise
*Strange Maps
The Strata-Sphere
Sweetness & Light
TalkLeft
Talking Points Memo
TaxProf
VDH's Private Papers
Volokh Conspiracy
Washington Monthly
Wizbang
Matt Welch
Winds of Change
Meryl Yourish
*Zip Dialog
zombietime


Canadians:


BlazingCatFur
Colby Cosh
Five Feet of Fury
Kate McMillan
Damian Penny
Bruce Rolston


Latin America:


Babalú
Caracas Chronicles
The Devil's Excrement
Venezuela News and Views


Overseas:


Bruce Bawer
Biased BBC
Tim Blair
*Andrew Bolt
Brussels Journal
*The Conservative Woman
Crooked Timber
Davids Medienkritik
Egyptian Sand Monkey
EU Referendum
Guido Fawkes
Harry's Place
Mick Hartley
Oliver Kamm
JG, Caesarea
¡No-Pasarán!
Melanie Phillips
Political Betting
John Ray
samizdata
Shark Blog
Natalie Solent
Laban Tall
*David Thompson
Michael Yon

Science Blogs:
The Blackboard
Cliff Mass Weather
Climate Audit
Climate Depot
Climate Science
*Judith Curry
Future Pundit
Gene Expression
The Loom
In The Pipeline
Roger Pielke Jr.
Real Climate
A Voyage To Arcturus
Watts Up With That?

Media Blogs:
My Northwest

R-Rated:
Horse's A**
Huffington Post

Emeritus:
Alien Corn
Dr. Sanity
Villainous Company
*new



Pseudo-Random Thoughts

The UN liked Donald Trump's joke.
President Trump had barely begun his address to the U.N. General Assembly on Tuesday when he claimed his tenure had “accomplished more than almost any administration in the history of our country,” the kind of over-the-top boast he usually reserves for his campaign rallies.

Around the cavernous hall, diplomats and world leaders broke into what even the official White House transcript described as laughter.

“Didn’t expect that reaction, but that’s OK,” Trump said, momentarily startled.   That prompted more guffaws and applause.
The joke was unintentional, apparently, but it is still a pretty good joke.

(I wonder whether the Russian delegation joined in the laughter.)
- 1:25 PM, 25 September 2018   [link]


Pelosi's Potential Problem:  Like most observers, I think the odds favor a Democratic takeover of the House this November.  (The FiveThirtyEight estimates, an 80 percent chance and an expected gain for the Democrats of 37 seats, seem about right to me.)

If the Democrats do win, the size of their majority may determine whether Nancy Pelosi again goes from Minority Leader to Speaker.  If it is a narrow margin, a few Democrats may refuse to vote for Pelosi, forcing the choice of a different Democrat.

(United States House of Representatives elections, 2018)
- 12:52 PM, 25 September 2018   [link]


Forgiveness May Not be cheap.
- 10:36 AM, 25 September 2018   [link]


Worth Reading:  Josh Rogin's column, "China's interference in US politics is just beginning".
While the trade war rages in public, behind the scenes the U.S. government is preparing for the possibility that the Chinese government will decide to weaponize the influence network inside the United States that it has been building for years.  Although Beijing has not yet employed Russian-style "active measures," it has these capabilities at the ready.

"We've seen a lot of preparatory work by the Chinese, and we understand what the realm of possibilities would be," an administration official told me.   "Our position now is to make folks aware of the danger that exists.  These Chinese activities are all about influencing our democratic processes."
Among many other things, the Beijing regime has "bought up several Chinese-language media outlets inside the United States".
- 4:11 PM, 24 September 2018   [link]


In Retrospect, It Seems Obvious That Trump Should Have Picked A Woman From The Federalist Society List, Rather Than Brett Kavanaugh:  Was it obvious before the nomination?

I think so, though I will admit that I didn't think of it at the time.  (But then I am not being paid to think about such questions, either.)

First, there is the obvious political benefit, something Reagan recognized in 1980, when he promised to put a woman on the Supreme Court.

Second, if Roe v. Wade is overturned (or even trimmed back) by some future court, it would be far better if there was at least one woman in the majority.

Third, a woman would have been easier to confirm, for reasons that I don't need to explain to anyone who has been following the news.
- 2:26, 24 September 2018   [link]


Most Of Us Would Avoid this restaurant.
- 1:40 PM, 24 September 2018   [link]


Worth Reading:  (Perhaps even worth studying.)

This article describing a Yale study on immigration.
Immigration is the focus of fierce political and policy debate in the United States.  Among the most contentious issues is how the country should address undocumented immigrants.  Like a tornado that won’t dissipate, arguments have spun around and around for years.  At the center lies a fairly stable and largely unquestioned number: 11.3 million undocumented immigrants residing in the U.S.  But a paper by three Yale-affiliated researchers suggests all the perceptions and arguments based on that number may have a faulty foundation; the actual population of undocumented immigrants residing in the country is much larger than that, perhaps twice as high, and has been underestimated for decades.
I've been wondering for years just how good that standard number is, and now I really wonder.

Three observations:

First, both the traditional estimate and the new Yale estimate say that our population of illegals grew rapidly in the 1990s, leveled off in the early 2000s, and has been relatively constant ever since.

Second, if the new estimate is roughly right, then the crime rate for illegals is about half the usual estimate.  (It is already lower than the rate for the native population.)

Third, since large numbers of illegals are still arriving regularly, large numbers of them must be leaving regularly, too.
- 6:49 PM, 23 September 2018   [link]


The Current "Pepper . . . And Salt" made me chuckle, briefly.

And then I started wondering whether the "new guy" was sitting at the head or the foot of the table.  (Usually, bosses sit at the head.)
-5:23 PM, 23 September 2018   [link]


5 Percent?!?  I had trouble believing that — until I saw the other numbers.
According to The Minnesota Star Tribune and Minnesota Public Radio News, a poll of 800 likely voters have Ellison leading against Republican candidate Doug Wardlow in the state race for attorney general 41-36.

However, the poll asks voters about their views on the abuse allegation made against Ellison by his ex-girlfiend, Karen Monahan.

When asked, “Do you believe her allegation, or not?” 21% of voters say they believe her while 22% say they don’t.  57% of likely voters say they aren’t sure.

But when that question is broken down by party, the numbers take sharp turns.

42% of Republicans say they believe Monahan while 15% don’t and 43% aren’t sure.   Among Democrats, only 5% believe his accuser while 30% dismiss the allegation.  65% of Democrats aren’t sure.
The last number, 65%, makes the 5% more believable.  It is likely that many Democrats suspect Ellison, but are unwilling to say so.

(From the little I have read, I would be inclined to say I believe her.  But, as you can see in this example, I try to be cautious about coming to definite conclusions on these accusations.)
- 3:52 PM, 22 September 2018   [link]


The Current "Pepper . . . And Salt" made me chuckle.

(I'm not sure why, exactly.)
- 12:54 PM, 22 September 2018   [link]


Another Attack on science.

The next thing you know, that dangerous thought criminal will be saying that men don't have uteri.

I hope the biologists at Durham are embarrassed by this incident.

(Durham University)
- 3:12 PM, 21 September 2018   [link]


Now Scientists Suspect Microwaves in those attacks on our diplomats in Cuba and China.

(One oddity:  For reasons that escape me, some of the experts believe that the attacks in Cuba were done by a rogue faction within the government, not the government itself. That isn't impossible, but it does seem implausible.)
- 12:47 PM, 21 September 2018   [link]


Sometimes Being Second doesn't work out well.
- 8:12 AM, 21 September 2018   [link]


Democrat Kim Schrier Is Running For Congress in Washington's 8th district.

In one of her TV ads, the pediatrician says:
Because career politicians don't fix problems; they just make hard problems worse.
Which left me wondering which career politicians she has in mind.  Former president Barack Obama?  House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi?  Washington's senior senator, Patty Murray?  Washington's governor, Jay Inslee?

All can fairly be described as "career politicians" — and, as you probably know, all are Democrats.

Wouldn't it be fun if some local reporter were to ask those officials whether they agree with her ad?

Since she brought up the subject, I'll add that elected Democrats are more likely to be career politicians than elected Republicans.

Examples:  Of Republican presidents since World War II, only Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford were career politicians; of Democrats, only Jimmy Carter was not.

(Schrier's campaign site)
- 7:29 PM, 20 September 2018   [link]


Interesting Reading:  This New York Times article, "Europe’s Triumphs and Troubles Are Written in Swiss Ice".

Among other things, scientists can see evidence of the Black Death and, preceding it, the Medieval Warm Period.
. . . temperatures in Europe and the nearby North Atlantic were as warm or warmer than they are now, and crops and forests flourished.
One surprise for me:  Corn (or maize, as the British call it) reached Europe with Columbus in 1493, but wasn't cultivated extensively there until about 1750.

(Medieval Warm Period)
- 4:29 PM, 20 September 2018   [link]


Today's New York Times Includes A Special Section:  Twelve pages of pictures, articles, graphs and time lines, titled, "The Plot to Subvert an Election: Unraveling the Russia Story So Far".

Obviously, I don't have an immediate reaction to all the material, other than to be impressed by the resources the Times has put into this investigation.   (The "So Far" implies that they expect to publish more, perhaps much more.)

You can get some idea of the section by reading a long excerpt from the lead article.
For two years, Americans have tried to absorb the details of the 2016 attack: hacked emails, social media fraud, suspected spies -- and President Trump's claims that it's all a hoax.  The Times explores what we know and what it means.
Or you can follow the link and read even more.

At this point, I should say that I am undecided, as I have been every since this story broke, about the central questions, whether Trump, or men in his campaign, "conspired" with the Russians.  (Recently, Senator Lindsey Graham said he didn't think Trump conspired with the Russians, because Trump doesn't think that far ahead, which should remind all of us of some of the difficulties we face in coming to conclusions on these questions.)
- 1:54 PM, 20 September 2018   [link]


Of The Current A-hed Stories, my favorite is the license plate bids.
Drivers obsessively seek tags with fewer digits, bidding up prices as high as $675,000 and sparring over them in divorces.
(Though I don't admire the people who make these bids, I am pleased to see states getting all this money, voluntarily.)
- 10:24 AM, 20 September 2018   [link]


Worth Reading:  Neo's post, "Memory and witnesses/victims".

Our memories are not nearly as good as we think they are, and false memories are surprisingly common.  As you probably know, therapists can sometimes create false memories, unintentionally, one hopes.

Does that mean that we probably will never know what, if anything, happened between Professor Ford and Judge Kavanaugh all those years ago?  Sadly, yes.
- 11:07 AM, 19 September 2018   [link]


The Current "Pepper . . . And Salt" made me smile.
- 10:35 AM, 19 September 2018   [link]


The "Lowlife" Had Been Fired By The "Conman"  But he gave her a new job anyway, a job for which she had no obvious qualifications.

She didn't work out, and was fired again.

Now the lowlife is seeking revenge by saying nasty things about the conman.  (Some of them may be true.)

Neither is famous for telling the truth, but it would still be fun if reporters asked Omarosa Manigault Newman why she wanted to work for a conman, and Donald Trump why he hired a lowlife.

(Aren't you glad we are spending our time discussing important issues?)
- 11:32 AM, 13 August 2018   [link]


This Andy Marlette Cartoon Doesn't Make A Deep Point, but it made me smile.
- 10:52 AM, 13 August 2018   [link]


Anne Applebaum Wonders Why "Institutions" weren't able to stop Paul Manafort — and Donald Trump — years ago.

I've wondered about the same thing, ever since Manafort joined the Trump campaign, although I phrased my question differently:  Why, I wondered, didn't prosecutors go after Manafort, when it was so obvious he was guilty of something or other, probably many somethings or others?

And during the campaign, I learned enough about Trump's dubious deals to wonder why so few prosecutors had gone after him.

And I have come up with tentative answers to that question, for each man.

With Manafort, I think prosecutors made a cost/benefit analysis, though not in any formal way.  He was not, at that time, a big name, so convicting him would not have made a prosecutor's reputation.  And so much of the evidence would have been in other nations, many of them not all that cooperative with US law enforcement.

So a trial, they would have thought, would be expensive and difficult — and there would be no certainty of a conviction, because much of the evidence would not be available.

Trump escaped some prosecutions by buying off those who had claims against him.   (And, possibly, by the judicious use of campaign contributions.)

Most prosecutors would rather have a settlement than nothing, but settlements rarely enhance a prosecutor's reputation the way a big conviction does.

So a trial, prosecutors would have thought, would be expensive and time consuming, and would probably end, at best, in a settlement.

It would be enlightening if some journalist, Applebaum for instance, were to ask prosecutors who could have done more why they didn't.

(Is Rudy Giuliani one of those prosecutors?  That's a great question, to which I do not have an answer.)
- 8:45 PM, 11 August 2018   [link]


There Was A Small Ironic Point In Last Year's Charlottesville Demonstrations:  (Along with the hate, violence, and death.)

As I am sure you recall, among the demonstrators were open anti-Semites, and even neo-Nazis.

They were there, ostensibly, to protest the removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee.

Who was supported, all through the Civil War, by Judah Benjamin.
Judah Philip Benjamin, QC (August 11, 1811 – May 6, 1884) was a lawyer and politician who was a United States Senator from Louisiana, a Cabinet officer of the Confederate States and, after his escape to the United Kingdom at the end of the American Civil War, an English barrister.  Benjamin was the first Jew to be elected to the United States Senate who had not renounced that faith, and was the first Jew to hold a Cabinet position in North America.
Confederates leaders had their faults, but they were not — for their time — especially anti-Semitic.

I suspect those neo-Nazis have never heard of Benjamin.
- 5:39 PM, 12 August 2018   [link]


The Current "Pepper . . . And Salt" made me chuckle.
- 2:52 PM, 12 August 2018   [link]


Archives

June 2002
July 2002
August 2002
September 2002
October 2002, Part 1 and Part 2
November 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
December 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3

January 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
February 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
March 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
April 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2004, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2004, Part 1, Part 2. Part 3, and Part 4
October 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2005, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2006, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2007, Part 1 Part 2, and Part 3, and Part 4
June 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2008, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4
May 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3. and Part 4

January 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2012, Part 1, Part 2 Part 3, and Part 4
August 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3and Part 4
December 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2013, , Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4
March 2014, Part 1. Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2015, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2015, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2017, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
April 2017, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2018, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2018, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2018, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2018, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2018, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2018, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2018, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2018, Part 1 and Part 2
September 2018, Part 3 and Part 4






Coming Soon
  • Plan 17 Conservatives
  • FDR and Waterboarding
  • Carbon, Carbon Dioxide, and Crescent Wrenches


Coming Eventually
  • JFK and Wiretaps
  • Green Republicans
  • The Rise and Fall and Rise of Black Voting
  • Abortion, Cleft Palates, and Europe
  • Kweisi Mfume's Children
  • Public Opinion During Other US Wars
  • Dual Loyalties
  • The Power Index
  • Baby Dancing
  • Jocks, but no Nerds
  • The Four Caliphs




Best Posts


Books


Strange Obama


The Unknown Bush


University Reform


Uncorrected Mistakes


Vote Fraud


The Gang of Four


Articles


Assignment Desk
(What's This?)


Columns


Common Mistakes
(What's This?)


Chomsky Cult Program


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