CWIN Vol. 1, No. 3
The Daemon Mechanic
Advanced Pickup and Camper Rules

Written by Andras O. Schneider and Michael P. Owen

Andras O. Schneider
andrasotto@olg.com

Michael P. Owen
owenmp@hotmail.com

Web Posted May 01, 1998
Updated August 05, 2000


Editor's Note: Sections marked with an (*) written by Michael P. Owen. All other sections written by Andras O. Schneider.

When the author of the most of these variants below visited a Ford dealership for a a vehicle part, the author acquired a brochure for the Super Pickup Truck Fleet. The gross vehicle weight (GVW) for the Ford F-550 Truck was not the Car Wars standard of 5,850 lbs., 6,500 lbs., 7,150 lbs., 7,800 lbs. (all four possible maximum loads for a pickup or a camper), or even 8,400 lbs. (the maximum load of a stretched-frame pickup with x-hvy. chassis). The GVW of this vehicle was listed as an astounding 19,000 lbs. Yes, nineteen-thousand pounds. If this figure was not amazing enough, the cargo capacity was listed as an incredible 12,425 lbs. The author realized instantly that "reality" has trucks that would annihilate a Car Wars pickup or camper in a few seconds of combat. Mr. Schneider realized that the current rules for pickups and campers must be fixed to correspond to the vehicles of 1998.

These rules are available only for pickups and campers, both standard styles and stretched-frame types. Although campers are pickups with reinforced camper shells and rearranged interiors, for these articles campers will be considered as station wagons (that is treated as a standard car). Unless otherwise stated, these rules only apply to pickups and not to campers.
 

High-Weight Capacities

Heavy-Duty Pickups/Campers  -- Multiplies body cost by 3x and increases body weight by 50 percent. No space required. The costs of chassis modifiers and suspension types are based on this new price of the body. While this modification does not affect the spaces of the vehicle, the HD frame conversion increases the maximum load from 6,500 lbs. to 10,000 lbs. This new maximum load can be altered by any of the possible chassis modifications. HD pickups cannot utilize carbon-aluminum frames. HD pickups may have four wheels with a heavy chassis while six wheels are required when an extra-heavy chassis is installed. The cost of the six-wheel option is 4x the standard cost and must be added to the frame cost before the HD multiplier and before chassis/suspension alterations.

*  Heavy-Duty Stretched-Chassis Pickups/Campers -- As above but the maximum load is increased to 11,000 lbs.

Super Pickups/Campers Multiplies body cost by 5x and increases body weight by 100 percent. No space required. The costs of chassis modifiers and suspension types are based on this new price of the body. While this modification does not affect the spaces of the vehicle, the HD frame conversion increases the maximum load from 6,500 lbs. to 15,000 lbs. This new maximum load can be altered by any of the possible chassis modifications. Super pickups cannot utilize carbon-aluminum frames. Super pickups must have six wheels with any type of chassis modification, including a standard chassis. The cost of the six-wheel option is 4x the standard cost and must be added to the frame cost before the Super multiplier and before chassis/suspension alterations.

*  Super Stretched-Chassis Pickups/Campers -- As above but the maximum load is is increased to 16,000 lbs.
 
 

Top and Back Facings of Pickups

Because of their dual-construction, a car-like area called the "cab" and a cargo area called the "bed," pickups have unique characteristics in vehicle construction and in combat. Note that all cargo space is in the bed.

There are two types of cargo in pickups, standard and bed. Standard cargo is distributed within the normal spaces of the pickup while bed cargo is specifically located in the open-top cargo bed area.

The cargo bed does have standard space surrounding it therefore side, back, and underbody weapons may be adjacent to this area.

Fuel tanks may be placed in the cargo bed although they are vulnerable to attacks from the top. Fuel tanks inside the pickup are usually placed between the cab and the cargo bed in standard space.

Pickups have two back-facings. The first is the back of the "cab." The second is the back of the "bed." Armor is purchased and installed normally, however when armor is applied to the back location of pickups, each individual back facing, cab back (CB) and bed-back (BB), receive the same amount of armor. For example, if a pickup is armored with 10 points of metal over 30 points of plastic in the back location, the cab-back would the bed-back would be armored exactly the same for no extra cost and no extra weight. Essentially, purchasing back armor for a pickup gives you armor for two locations.

When targeting the back facing of a pickup the normal penalty of targeting the back of a car (not a subcompact or a compact) of -1 is assessed. The specific back facing damaged, CB or BB, is determined randomly (50 percent chance to hit either) when a weapon succeeds in hitting the back facings of the vehicle. If the attacker desires to hit a specific back-facing, apply an additional -1 to-hit for targeting CB or BB.

Weapons may be mounted in either BC or BB facing. Both locations have the same arc-of-fire as back-weapons on other vehicles. A smart link is not required to connect BC weapons to BB weapons; standard links are acceptable. Two sponson turrets may be mounted on the back facings of pickups. One sponson mount may be mounted on the cab back and another may be installed on the bed back (placed below the cargo bed, not blocking access to the bed for purposes of loading cargo, unloading pedestrians, etc.). All cargo bed spaces of pickups may be used for weapons placed on open mounts.

Because the layout of pickups is similar to helicopters, a standard interior with a cargo area in the rear, these vehicles can mount weapons like their aerial counterparts. Weapons may be mounted in the cargo area if the weapons are facing right, left, or back. Weapons placed in cargo do not need to be modified for cargo occupancy like cargo PPs and ICEs installed in the cargo areas of monster trucks.

Anything in the cargo bed area is vulnerable from top-facing attacks. If a burst-effect weapon is used to attack the cargo area of a pickup, the burst-effect will affect the weapons and pedestrians mounted in the cargo area (only if the burst-effect can harm vehicular components, such as burst-effects from mines and grenades). Cargo weapons are not protected by the top armor, but they can be protected with component armor. This CA can be placed in either standard space or cargo space.

Pickup cargo beds are very similar to flatbed trailers, enabling pickups to increase their space capacity for cargo although risking loss of the components. The listed value of cargo space is the maximum volume of cargo that can be carried safely. If this space is exceeded there is a one in six chance that for every five spaces exceeding the cargo bed value the load will fall off the vehicle (2d6 spaces of cargo remaining). This loss of cargo occurs when a D3 or more difficult maneuver is performed or hazard taken. Cargo racks increase the safe volume by eight spaces.

The paths of weapon and collision damage when either back location is hit are shown below:

Back-Cab -- BC Armor, (BC Weapons), (Crew, Motor, Cargo), (Front Weapons), Front Armor
Back-Bed BB Armor, (BB Weapons, Bed Cargo), (Crew, Motor, Cargo), (Front Weapons), Front Armor

As mentioned above pickups have construction similar to ten-wheelers, with a cab compartment and a cargo bed section. When pickups are targeted from above this difference affects combat.

Pickups have two top facings, top-cab (TC) and top-bed (TB). Armor is purchased and installed normally however when armor is applied to the top location of pickups, each individual top facing, TC and TB, receive the same amount of armor. For example, if a pickup will be armored with 10 points of metal over 30 points of plastic in the top location, the TC and the TB would be armored exactly the same for no extra cost and no extra weight. Essentially, purchasing top armor for a pickup gives you armor for two locations.

The paths of weapon and collision damage when either top location is hit are shown below:

Top-Cab TC Armor, (TC Weapons), (Crew, Motor, Cargo), (Underbody Weapons), Underbody Armor
Top-Bed (Bed Cargo, Bed Weapons, Bed Crew), TB Armor, (Underbody Weapons), Underbody Armor

When targeting the top facing of a pickup determine chance to hit then roll for damage if the strike is successful. The specific top facing damaged, TC or TB, is determined randomly (50 percent chance to hit either). If the attacker desires to hit a specific top facing, apply an additional -1 to-hit for targeting TC or TB. Individual components in the cargo bed can be targeted when the cargo bed is attacked from the top facing. To determine the to-hit number apply the standard penalties (pedestrian, tripod weapon, fifth wheel, etc.) although do not apply the penalty of -1 above for targeting the top-bed specifically.
 

New Equipment

*  Armored Cargo Bed Cover For pickup installation only. Cost and weight equal to one point of pickup frame armor (rounded up). There is no limit to the amount of armor applied and all types of armor are available. CBCs completely cover the cargo bed of a pickup protecting it from top attacks. Installation and removal of a CBC requires one minute and is a Trivial Task for a Mechanic although without tools such as a winch several people will be needed to lift the cover. When placed on a pickup, a CBC prevents pedestrians and open mounts occupying the cargo bed area. Fifth-wheel hitches can be installed with a CBC, although the CBC needs to be removed for the hitch to be connected to a trailer. Tripod, ring and pintle mounts can be installed in the cargo bed when a CBC is added; those weapons need to be dismantled, a Trivial Task for a Mechanic requiring one minute) and will be protected by the CBC, BB, and side armor facings. Addition of a CBC increases top speed by 10 percent (rounded down to multiple of 2.5 mph) and decreases fuel consumption by 10 percent (rounded down). CBCs can be combined with a cargo rack although the speed and range bonuses are no longer in effect.

*  Cargo Bed Weaponry For pickup installation only. Weapons placed in the cargo bed must be of standard cost and weight. Field modifications are not permitted although weapons on tripods, ring mounts and pintle mounts may be field-modified. Weapons in the cargo bed do not need to be modified for cargo occupancy (PPs and ICEs placed in cargo space require extra cost, weight, and space for larger cooling and stabilization systems).

Fifth-Wheel Car Trailer Hitch For pickup installation only. $1,000, 100 lbs., 2 cargo spaces, 4 DP. Load weight 24,000 lbs. This hitch is placed in the cargo area of a pickup, permitting maneuvers up to 90 degrees without the chance of a jackknife occurring. The hitch is fully-protected by the frame armor of the pickup and is only affected when damage enters the cargo area. Trailer hitch armor can be installed normally without the maneuver restrictions normally endured by that armor. Collisions with the combination vehicle still affect both the trailer hitch of the pickup and the kingpin of the car trailer normally. Pickups with the fifth-wheel hitch cannot mount spoilers but can mount airdams. A pickup windjammer can be installed in place of a turret or other top-mounted accessory.

Pickup Windjammer For pickup installation only. $250, 35 lbs. (half cost and half weight of windjammers for tractors). When a pickup is towing a car trailer with the fifth-wheel car trailer hitch the pickup windjammer the drain of Power Units is decreased by 10 percent while pickups with ICEs or HDEs gain 10 percent to their base MPGs. These range bonuses are cumulative with streamlining. A turret may be mounted with a pickup windjammer, but the turret can no longer fire into the front facing (only able to fire into the right and left facings of the pickup). For $100, 15 lbs., and 1 space (half cost and weight for a tractor windjammer) a device may be installed in the pickup to raise or lower the windjammer from inside the cab of the pick-up. Lowering the windjammer permits a turret to have full traverse (front, right, and left facings). A turret cannot fire into the top facing when the windjammer has been raised. Raising or lowering a pick-up windjammer is a firing action. Pickup windjammers and spoilers cannot be mounted together.

35' Van Car Trailer Frame cost $2,500, Frame weight 4,000 lbs., Maximum load 20,000 lbs., Volume capacity 60 spaces. Armor costs $40 and weighs 18 lbs. per point plastic. Tongue has 6 DP. Requires eight tires in a two-axle configuration placed in the back of the vehicle. External item mounting limits are the same as a 40' van trailer. This vehicle can be towed by pickups equipped with a fifth-wheel hitch as well as tractors.