Last updated:
1:57 PM, 1 July 2015



Jim Miller on Politics

  Email:
jimxc1 at gmail.com



What's he reading? Francis Parkman.

News Compilers
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References:

Adherents
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How Stuff Works
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ABC News Note
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My Group Blog:
Sound Politics

Northwest:


The American Empire
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Chief Brief
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Croker Sack
"DANEgerus"
Economic Freedom
Federal Way Conservative
Freedom Foundation
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<pudge/*>
Northwest Progressive Institute
*Progressive Majority
Matt Rosenberg
Seattle Blogger
Seattle Bubble
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West Sound Politics
Zero Base Thinking


Other US:


Ace of Spades HQ
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Keith Hennessey
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Le-gal In-sur-rec-tion
Little Green Footballs
Megan McArdle
Michelle Malkin
Greg Mankiw
Marginal Revolution
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The ModerateVoice
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"neo-neocon"
Betsy Newmark
Newsbusters
No Watermelons Allowed
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*The Optimistic Conservative
The Ornery American
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Daniel Pipes
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Pollster.com
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Rand Simberg
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zombietime


Canadians:


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Five Feet of Fury
Kate McMillan
Damian Penny
Bruce Rolston


Latin America:


Babalú
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Venezuela News and Views


Overseas:


"Franco Aleman"
Bruce Bawer
Biased BBC
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JG, Caesarea
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¡No-Pasarán!
Fredrik Norman
Melanie Phillips
John Ray
samizdata
Shark Blog
Natalie Solent
Somtow's World
Bjørn Stærk
Laban Tall
*David Thompson
Michael Yon
This is Zimbabwe

Science Blogs:
The Blackboard
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Climate Science
*Judith Curry
Future Pundit
Gene Expression
The Loom
In The Pipeline
Roger Pielke Jr.
Real Climate
A Voyage To Arcturus
Watts Up With That?

Media Blogs:
Andrew Malcolm
Dori Monson
David Postman
Rhetorical Ammo
Tierney Lab
*White House Dossier

R-Rated:
Horse's A**
Huffington Post

*new



Happy Birthday!  To our Canadian friends, who are celebrating Canada Day.  (Which they used to call "Dominion Day".)

Canadian flag

  Since Canada was founded in 1867, this is their 148th birthday.  The man most responsible for that founding was Canada's first Prime Minister, John Macdonald.

Here's a brief statement from Prime Minister Stephen Harper.   (Which President Obama would do well to imitate, three days from now.)

Recycled, with some changes, from 2008.

(Picture notes:  This flag appears every Canada Day, a few blocks from where I live, along with the American flag, which you can just see behind it.  In 2008, I finally met the couple that own the flags.  He's American; she's Canadian.  And the two seem to be getting along very well, which may be a lesson for our two nations.)
- 1:57 PM, 1 July 2015   [link]


Worth Reading:  Matt Ridley on "The Climate Wars’ Damage to Science".

Here's how he begins:
For much of my life I have been a science writer.  That means I eavesdrop on what’s going on in laboratories so I can tell interesting stories.  It’s analogous to the way art critics write about art, but with a difference: we “science critics” rarely criticise.   If we think a scientific paper is dumb, we just ignore it.  There’s too much good stuff coming out of science to waste time knocking the bad stuff.

Sure, we occasionally take a swipe at pseudoscience—homeopathy, astrology, claims that genetically modified food causes cancer, and so on.  But the great thing about science is that it’s self-correcting.  The good drives out the bad, because experiments get replicated and hypotheses put to the test.  So a really bad idea cannot survive long in science.

Or so I used to think.  Now, thanks largely to climate science, I have changed my mind.  It turns out bad ideas can persist in science for decades, and surrounded by myrmidons of furious defenders they can turn into intolerant dogmas.
His account of the problems of climate science is the most comprehensive I've seen.
- 12:59 PM, 1 July 2015   [link]


Those Hillary Clinton Emails are pretty funny.
At the same time, Clinton’s emails from 2009 illustrate a strange disconnect from the White House she served: a canceled meeting at the White House, finding out about a Cabinet gathering on the radio—and senior White House staff asking for her personal email address.

Of course, the emails, released Tuesday night by the State Department, present just one window into Clinton’s communications and interactions.  (It’s the second large-scale release of Clinton’s emails, following the publication in May of hundreds of her communications on the 2012 attacks in Benghazi.)  The documents only show declassified emails and exclude phone calls, meetings, and classified communications—none of which we can see.

But that imperfect window reveals some odd things.  [Sidney] Blumenthal, in particular, comes across as the foreign policy equivalent of a late night drunk texter.  The “give me a call” email is one of many the moonlighting adviser fired off in 2009.  Blumenthal sent that message in June, as Clinton was considering whether to bring him onto her State Department staff, an idea the White House eventually nixed.  But that didn’t stop the journalist and longtime Clinton loyalist from chiming in on myriad issues and personalities on which he purported to have insider knowledge.
But also pretty dismaying.

In theory, President Obama and Secretary Clinton should have been working on our foreign policy together; in practice, they seem not to even have communicated with each other, in any regular and systematic way.  For instance, Clinton was unable to get any guidance on what, if anything, to say to Afghanistan President Hamid Karzai, after Obama had announced a new policy for Afghanistan.

Those who have studied how organizations work — and don't work — will already be thinking of how they can turn these emails into case studies on what not to do.
- 10:47 AM, 1 July 2015   [link]


What's The Most Common Vertebrate?  Of all the fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals, which is the most common?

A little fish, the bristlemouth, that I can't recall even having heard of before yesterday.
Water, however, is a different story.  It covers more than 70 percent of the earth’s surface and goes down miles.  Scientists put the ocean’s share of the biosphere at more than 99 percent.  Fishermen know its surface waters and explorers its depths.   But in general, compared with land, the global ocean is unfamiliar.

Which helps explain why scientists have only recently come to realize that the bristlemouth — a fish of the middle depths that glows in the dark and can open its mouth extraordinarily wide, baring needlelike fangs — is the most numerous vertebrate on the earth.
. .
[I]chthyologists put the likely figure for bristlemouths at hundreds of trillions — and perhaps quadrillions, or thousands of trillions.

“No other animal gets close,” said Peter C. Davison, a fish scientist at the Farallon Institute for Advanced Ecosystem Research, in Petaluma, Calif.  “There are as many as a dozen per square meter of ocean.”
A trillion here, a trillion there, pretty soon you're talking about quadrillions of these little fish.

At a quadrillion, you leave budget numbers behind (for now), and begin to share numbers with astronomers.

Scientists don't know a lot about these fish, but they have discovered that they can change sexes, naturally.
But this strange little fish makes up for its diminutive size with staggering numbers, as well as a behavioral trick or two.

It starts life as a male and, in some cases, switches to become a female.   Scientists call it protandrous — that is, a male-first hermaphrodite — a phenomenon also seen in certain worms, limpets and butterflies.

John C. Avise, the author of “Hermaphroditism,” said the adult male bristlemouth tended to be smaller than the female and had a better developed sense of smell — apparently, he said, to find mates in the darkness.
(Emphasis added.)

It would be more precise to say that it is always both male and female, but that, in some bristlemouths, the male genes get turned off, and the female genes get turned on.   (Evolutionary theorists are probably delighted by this example — and frustrated by the difficulty of studying the fish.)

The article does not answer the question that will occur to most non-scientists:  Are bristlemouths good to eat?  Perhaps investigators should send a few of the fish to some of the more creative cooks in Louisiana to find out what dishes can be made from them.

(The most common land vertebrate?  Probably the domestic chicken at about 24 billion.

For more, here are the Wikipedia articles on bristlmouths, protandry, and the man who first saw bristlemouths in their natural environment, William Beebe.

Minor correction:  William Broad begins the article by saying that the zone of life is narrower on land than in the water.  That's true of you are discussing vertebrates, but not true if you include bacteria.)
- 7:18 AM, 1 July 2015   [link]


Another Marriage Proposal For The Obama Family:  This one less serious than the one to Malia.
Robert Mugabe has mocked America's decision to legalise gay marriage across all 50 states by vowing to travel to the White House and proposing to Barack Obama.

During his weekly interview with the national radio station, the Zimbabwean president joked that he planned to travel to Washington DC 'get down on one knee and ask his hand'.
Presumably, President Mugabe would ask Justice Kennedy to preside over the ceremony.

On a more serious note, whatever your views about gay marriage, you should recognize that President Obama's embrace of it will cause diplomatic problems for us in many nations, especially in Africa and the Middle East.

And I think we can conclude that Mugabe does not respect President Obama.  It doesn't matter much what Mugabe thinks, but it is likely that many other, more serious leaders don't respect Obama, either.

(We can be sure that Mugabe is not serious because he is not offering any cows for Obama.)
- 5:34 AM, 1 July 2015   [link]


Since It Is Now 1 July In Greece, the country is in default, having been unable to make a last-minute deal.

Negotiations continue, but, unless the referendum on Sunday results in a new government, they are unlikely to succeed.

Tonight, BBC America interviewed Nicholas Burns, who has been, among many other things, the American ambassador to Greece.   Burns said, though not in these blunt words, that Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras had zero friends in the European Union governments, that he had managed to alienate them all during his brief time in office.

(I assume all of you know that often negotiators will continue to negotiate, not in hopes of an agreement, but because they want to show various publics that they are not the ones responsible for the failure to reach an agreement.  It's my impression that Greece's creditors have reached that point, though I'm not sure just when they did.

For entertainment, and some useful background, you might want to read this George Will column.)
- 6:38 PM, 30 June 2015   [link]


The NYT Science Section Is Substituting Pictures For Stories:  Today, as in several previous weeks, the front page of the section is dominated by a large picture; in fact, the picture takes up about three-and-a-half times as much space on the front page as the article it illustrates, poorly.

For some years now, our newspaper of record has been cutting back on their Tuesday Science section.  Here's how good it used to be:  Some years ago, I was working in an organization that did science and engineering.  Then, as now, I read the Times most days.  Co-workers found that section as interesting as I did, and so I started circulating it with an informal distribution list.  As I recall, eventually there were more than ten people sharing that section.

Now, although I still read all of the section every week, and still often learn things from it, it has much less science in it than it once did.  Recently, the Times has even been trying to disguise the lack of articles with those giant pictures.

Today's section is typical.  The front page has that giant picture; the second page has most of the lead article, and some smaller pieces, none of which show any original reporting; the third page has an article on the lack of ethics in Chinese genetic research, a review of two books on medicine, and some letters; the fourth and fifth pages are labeled "Well" and have articles on health issues; and the sixth page has an interesting article by John Tierney on slow-developing love, an article on autistic kids and pets, and an article on poisonous sports fish in Florida.

And that's it.

As I said in March, I agree with Alex Berezow that the science coverage at the Times has declined though, as I also said then, I wouldn't go as far as he did.

It is worth speculating — and that is all I am doing — on why this has happened.  And for that I turn to this observation from one of the more interesting science writers around, John Tierney, who happens to work for the Times.
Liberals have an easy time mocking creationist conservatives, whose impact on the practice of science I consider to be nil.  But I wonder who on the Left would be willing to defend its overall record, which includes the promotion of so many unscientific fears (of genetically modified foods, fracking, nuclear power, etc.) and the ostracism of researchers who pursue taboo topics (like the effects of single-parent families, or innate differences between the sexes).
As our newspaper of record has become more and more politicized, it has become less and less willing to cover those issues, and others where scientific findings cast doubt on leftist ideas.   And so they have been cutting back on their coverage of science, so much so that they are even substituting large pictures for articles.

But, I repeat, I am speculating.  But I haven't seen a better explanation.  And other sections where leftist ideas are less likely to be threatened, notably "Style" and "Arts", do not seem to have suffered the same cutbacks.

(Oh, and that lead article?  It's interesting enough to deserve a post of its own, which it will get, soon, I hope.)
- 4:18 PM, 30 June 2015   [link]


John Lott Refutes President Obama:   Again.
In the wake of the murders in Charleston, President Obama has made more exaggerations and false claims about gun violence in America.   He made two public addresses this past week — one to the nation on Thursday and one to the U.S. Conference of Mayors on Friday.  On both occasions, he gave distorted impressions of how rates of violence in America compare with those in the rest of the world.

In his address to the nation, Obama claimed that, “We as a country will have to reckon with the fact that this type of mass violence does not happen in other advanced countries.  It doesn’t happen in other places with this kind of frequency.”
Actually, it does, as Lott shows in the rest of the opinion piece.

But this refutation, like others, will have no effect on Obama.  He will continue to say things that he should know are false.

And he has had every opportunity to learn these things.  He and Lott were colleagues at the University of Chicago, but Obama didn't act like a colleague.
"I don't believe people should be able to own guns," Obama told Lott one day at the University of Chicago Law School.

Lott explains that he first met Obama shortly after completing his research on concealed handgun laws and crime.

"He did not come across as a moderate who wanted to bring people together," Lott writes.

After he introduced himself to Obama, Lott suggested that they have lunch one day to discuss their views on guns.  According to Lott, Obama "grimaced and turned away."   That was the way many conversations with Obama ended, Lott says.

Although the Law School was famous for the openness of its faculty and friendly engagement, Lott says, "Obama...preferred silent, scowling disdain to collegiality."
Obama has learned how to pose as open minded — but has never learned how to be open minded.

If a colleague of mine had come to conclusions that I thought were wildly wrong, I would want to hear what he had to say.  I would be confident enough to think that — most likely — I would be able to see where he had gone wrong.  And if he was right?   Then I would have learned something.

(The story can be found in Lott's book, At the Brink.)
- 11:01 AM, 30 June 2015   [link]


Has Mattel Ruined The American Dolls Line?  Sure looks that way.  Alexandra Petri reacts:
Dear American Girl,

What, what, what are you doing?

The Atlantic points out the dreadful change that the once-famed catalog of historic yet personable dolls is slowly undergoing.  Forget Samantha the Victorian girl, Molly the plucky World War II doll with the Victory Garden, or original Colonial girl Felicity.  Felicity’s been retired to the Upstate Doll Farm.   So’s Samantha.  Kirsten the pioneer?  Gone.  Instead, get a Girl of the Year, or a My American Girl who Looks Just Like You.
I always thought the point of the line was the historical connections.  And I don't think too many people here think we have too little narcissism in the United States, or that our kids know too much history.

(It's possible that Mattel got tired of the controversies associated with some of the historical dolls and decided to go contemporary and bland — while keeping prices high.)
- 9:14 AM, 30 June 2015   [link]


Grexit Delayed?   Maybe.
The Greek government has requested a new bailout deal from the eurozone, just hours before its bailout expires and it must repay €1.6bn (£1.1bn) to the International Monetary Fund (IMF).

Greece is reportedly asking for a new two-year aid deal from the bailout mechanism for eurozone countries.
We can simplify that:  Greece wants to borrow some more money in order to pay back a small portion of the money it has already borrowed.

The deal might make financial sense if the Greek government agreed to impose even more pain on Greek voters — and then actually did that.

To me, it looks like an attempt by Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras to stay in power for two more years, somehow.

(That BBC article has enough links to other articles to satisfy almost anyone's curiosity.  As far as I can tell, their coverage of the Greek crisis had been reasonably balanced, if sometimes less clear than it should be.

Two follow-ups:  According to the BBC last night, "Grexit" rhymes with "exit".  Also according to the BBC, Tsipras has said he will resign if the referendum on Sunday passes.)
- 8:35 AM, 30 June 2015   [link]


DARPA Is Thinking Ahead:  Decades ahead.
Modifying a planet's atmosphere to make it habitable for humans could soon be a possibility, according to the Pentagon’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

Darpa has announced it is developing terraforming technology in a bid to recreate the conditions needed for live to thrive.

It would see a number of organisms introduced to the Martian environment, making regions on the surface suitable for humans.
Thinking decades ahead is just what they should be doing, of course.

(The idea of using bacteria to terraform other planets has been around for decades.)
- 7:53 AM, 29 June 2015   [link]


The European Creditors Have Given Up On Greece:  Because, they say, they were unable to reach an agreement with the Tsipras government.  So they are cutting off his allowance.
Greek leaders planned to shutter their banks for six business days starting Monday and impose strict limits on ATM withdrawals amid rising global concerns about the nation’s economic future.

Sunday’s decision to declare a bank holiday was a signal that Greece’s five-year battle to stay in the shared euro currency may swiftly be coming to an end, as leaders elsewhere urged steps to find a way to avoid that.  Panicked citizens tried to pull their money from their accounts while they still could.  ATMs in Athens were running out of money, and tensions were running high as Greeks stood in line for hours to scrape together cash for basic supplies.  Lines mounted at gas stations as worried residents topped off their tanks for what could be a protracted period of time in a cashless nation.
. . .
The decision to close the banks came after the European Central Bank announced Sunday that it would not enlarge an emergency loan program that has been a vital lifeline in recent weeks to Greece’s overextended financial institutions.  Fearful Greeks have been pulling their money out of the banks, worried that they could lose access to it altogether or that it could turn into a less valuable currency in the event Greece is kicked out of the euro zone.
Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras triggered this crisis by refusing to agree to enough reforms to satisfy creditors, and by scheduling a referendum on the European proposals — a referendum which he hopes will lose.

And, if the July 5th referendum does lose, then what?  I assume Tsipras thinks that will give him more bargaining power, so he can go back to asking for more money and time, and offering fewer reforms.

If he does think that, he's probably wrong.  Central bankers almost all believe that they often must go against popular opinion.

What if the Greeks accept the European terms in that referendum?  It isn't clear, at least to me, what would happen.  A conventional politician might resign and call for a new election in those circumstances, but Tsipras has never been a conventional politician.

(There's more on the Greek crisis here, here, and many other places.)
- 7:22 AM, 29 June 2015   [link]


Can You Say "Grexit"?  I can't, since I don't know whether it has a short "e" or a long "e".  For an ordinary English word, the first would be more likely, and the word would rhyme with "exit".  But, since it's formed from "Greek" and "exit", it might be pronounced the other way.

There's a good chance that I will hear the word in the next few days, since the Greeks are getting closer to being forced to exit from the euro, and perhaps even the European Union, getting closer to going bankrupt, or, to be less charitable, closer to officially admitting they are bankrupt.
The eurozone is facing its gravest crisis in its 16-year history.  Greece is on the verge of defaulting.

Almost certainly it will fail to repay a loan to the International Monetary Fund (IMF) on Tuesday.  The risk of Greece leaving the eurozone has increased significantly.   Both Europe and Greece have entered a period of turbulence with neither side in control of events.
Naturally, Greeks have been trying to get at least some of their money out of banks, before the banks are closed, which may happen on Monday.

Predictions vary as to what would happen after a Grexit; the Wikipedia article summarizes the extremes:
Proponents of the proposal argue that leaving the euro and reintroducing the drachma would dramatically boost exports and tourism and encourage the local economy while discouraging expensive imports.  Opponents argue that the proposal would impose excessive hardship on the Greek people, cause civil unrest, destabilize and harm the reputation of the eurozone, and could cause Greece to align more with non-EU states.
I suspect that, if it does happen, the result will be between those extremes of salvation and catastrophe, but haven't any idea which is more likely, in the short run.  In the long run, I favor a Greek exit, considering how badly the euro experiment has worked out for them.

On the other hand, the only two Greek parties that favor the Grexit are the Communists and the Golden Dawn, a fascist party, which does make me worry that I might be missing something.

(The money folks also think there might be a "Graccident", an exit from the euro forced by events, even though neither the Greek government, nor its creditors, want that to happen.)
- 4:35 PM, 28 June 2015   [link]


"Every State Flag Is Wrong"  Alexandra Petri makes a fairly good case for that sweeping conclusion.

Here, for instance, is what she said about the Washington state flag:
Come on.  You can’t just pass a crude rendition of a dollar bill off as a flag.  I don’t care if your name IS Washington.
But I would quibble with a few of her attacks.  For instance, I think the Arizona flag looks good.

(To my eyes, most of the state flags fail by being too specific, by looking like state seals (which they often incorporate), rather than flags, which should be simplified, even abstract.  I think the Anmerican and British flags get the level about right.

You can go too far in the other direction; I've long thought that the French tricoulour was too abstract, perhaps because the French are still arguing over much of their history, and so didn't want to be specific.)
- 8:17 AM, 28 June 2015   [link]


Local Suicide Attack:  Very local.

Yesterday, about 5:30 AM, I heard a bang and the lights went out.  I immediately guessed that a squirrel had decided to sacrifice itself in order to attack our power grid, and quickly found out that I was right.  It took three or four hours for the power company (Puget Sound Energy) to replace the transformer, which I gave me an excuse to go out for breakfast, and then skip putting up any posts.

This is at least the second, and possibly the third or fourth, attack by a squirrel on that particular pole-mount transformer while I've been living here, which makes me wonder why it is so vulnerable, and why squirrels find it attractive.

(For what it's worth, the cable company (Comcast) showed up an hour or two before the power company.)
- 6:49 AM, 28 June 2015   [link]


Archives

June 2002
July 2002
August 2002
September 2002
October 2002, Part 1 and Part 2
November 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
December 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3

January 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
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January 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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January 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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June 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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October 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2006, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2007, Part 1 and Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2007, Part 1 Part 2, and Part 3, and Part 4
June 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2008, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4
May 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3. and Part 4

January 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2012, Part 1, Part 2 Part 3, and Part 4
August 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3and Part 4
December 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2013, , Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4
March 2014, Part 1. Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2015, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2015, Part 1






Coming Soon
  • Plan 17 Conservatives
  • FDR and Waterboarding
  • How Long Do Wars Last?
  • Carbon, Carbon Dioxide, and Crescent Wrenches
  • De-Lawyering and Attorney General McKenna


Coming Eventually
  • JFK and Wiretaps
  • Green Republicans
  • The Rise and Fall and Rise of Black Voting
  • Abortion, Cleft Palates, and Europe
  • Kweisi Mfume's Children
  • Public Opinion During Other US Wars
  • Dual Loyalties
  • The Power Index
  • Baby Dancing
  • Jocks, but no Nerds
  • The Four Caliphs




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