Last updated:
4:09 PM, 21 July 2017



Jim Miller on Politics

  Email:
jimxc1 at gmail.com



What's he reading? Francis Parkman.

News Compilers
(Why These?)

A&L Daily
Drudge
Hot Air
Jewish World Review
Lucianne
Mediaite
memeorandum
Monsters and Critics
*newser
Orbusmax
Rantburg
Real Clear Politics
SciTech Daily
Yahoo


Big Media
(Why These?)

Atlantic Monthly
*Axios
BBC
CNN
Chosen Ilbo
Daily Mail (UK)
Deutsche Welle
Fox News
Globe and Mail (CA)
Guardian (UK)
Investor's Business Daily
Le Figaro (FR)
Le Monde (FR)
The Local (Sweden)
National Review
New York Times
The New Yorker
Politico
Seattle PI
Seattle Times
Slate
Slashdot
The Spectator (UK)
Der Spiegel
Telegraph (UK)
Times (UK)
El Universal
U. S. News
USA Today
Wall Street Journal
Washington Examiner
Washington Post
Washington Times


References:

Adherents
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Census Quick Facts
Dave Leip's Election Atlas
FactCheck
Federal Statistics
How Stuff Works
NationMaster
Refdesk
Snopes
StateMaster
Tax Facts
Unionstats
Wikipedia


Smart Media
(Why These?)

*The American
The American Spectator
Michael Barone
City Journal
Commentary
Front Page Magazine
Michael Fumento
The Hill
Media Research
Michael Medved
New York Sun
Number Watch
PJ Media
Public Interest
Roll Call
Spinsanity
Townhall
The Weekly Standard


Blogs
(Why These?)

My Group Blog:
Sound Politics

Northwest:


Chief Brief
Clear Fog Blog
Economic Freedom
Orcinus
Public Interest Transportation Forum
<pudge/*>
Northwest Progressive Institute
Seattle Bubble
West Sound Politics


Other US:


Ace of Spades HQ
Ann Althouse
American Thinker
The Anchoress
Armies of Liberation
Art Contrarian
"Baldilocks"
Balloon Juice
Baseball Crank
La Shawn Barber
Beldar
Bleat
Bookworm Room
Broadband Politics
Stuart Buck
Keith Burgess-Jackson
Chef Mojo
Chicago Boyz
Classical Values
*College Insurrection
Confederate Yankee
Jules Crittenden
Daily Pundit
Discriminations
Gregory Djerejian
Daniel W. Drezner
Econlog
Econopundit
Election Law
John Ellis
Engage
Dean Esmay
Gary Farber
Fausta
FiveThirtyEight
Flares into Darkness
Flopping Aces
The Long War Journal
Keith Hennessey
Hugh Hewitt
Siflay Hraka
Instapundit
Iowahawk
Joanne Jacobs
Jeff Jarvis
The Jawa Report
Brothers Judd
JustOneMinute
Kausfiles
Kesher Talk
Le-gal In-sur-rec-tion
Little Green Footballs
Megan McArdle
Michelle Malkin
Greg Mankiw
Marginal Revolution
Mazurland
Minding the Campus
The ModerateVoice
*The Monkey Cage Mudville Gazette
"neo-neocon"
Betsy Newmark
Newsbusters
No Watermelons Allowed
*The Optimistic Conservative
The Ornery American
Parapundit
"Patterico"
Daniel Pipes
Polipundit
Political Arithmetik
Political Calculations
Pollster.com
Power and Control
Power Line
Protein Wisdom
QandO
Radio Equalizer
RedState
Riehl World View
Right Wing News
Rightwing Nuthouse
Dr. Sanity
Scrappleface
Screw Loose Change
Linda Seebach
Sense of Events
Joshua Sharf
Rand Simberg
Smart Politics
The Spirit of Enterprise
Stability For Our Time
*Strange Maps
The Strata-Sphere
Andrew Sullivan
Sweetness & Light
Taking Hayek Seriously
TalkLeft
Talking Points Memo
TaxProf
USS Neverdock
VDH's Private Papers
Verum Serum
Volokh Conspiracy
Washington Monthly
Wizbang
Matt Welch
Winds of Change
Meryl Yourish
zombietime


Canadians:


BlazingCatFur
Colby Cosh
Five Feet of Fury
Kate McMillan
Damian Penny
Bruce Rolston


Latin America:


Babalú
Caracas Chronicles
The Devil's Excrement
Venezuela News and Views


Overseas:


"Franco Aleman"
Bruce Bawer
Biased BBC
Tim Blair
*Andrew Bolt
Peter Briffa
Brussels Journal
Butterflies and Wheels
Crooked Timber
Davids Medienkritik
Egyptian Sand Monkey
EU Referendum
Greenie Watch
Guido Fawkes
Harry's Place
Mick Hartley
Oliver Kamm
JG, Caesarea
*Le Monde Watch
¡No-Pasarán!
Fredrik Norman
Melanie Phillips
*Political Betting
John Ray
samizdata
Shark Blog
Natalie Solent
Somtow's World
Bjørn Stærk
Laban Tall
*David Thompson
Michael Yon

Science Blogs:
The Blackboard
Cliff Mass Weather
Climate Audit
Climate Depot
Climate Science
*Judith Curry
Future Pundit
Gene Expression
The Loom
In The Pipeline
Roger Pielke Jr.
Real Climate
A Voyage To Arcturus
Watts Up With That?

Media Blogs:
Andrew Malcolm
Dori Monson
David Postman
Rhetorical Ammo
Tierney Lab
*White House Dossier

R-Rated:
Horse's A**
Huffington Post

Emeritus:
Alien Corn
Villainous Company
*new



Pseudo-Random Thoughts

Jeff Bezos Is Thinking Ahead:  Way ahead.
- 4:09 PM, 21 July 2017   [link]


President Trump Doesn't Like Getting "Pinocchios"   But he is piling them up at a remarkable rate.

In March, I made this comparison:
In my opinion, Barack Obama is at least one order of magnitude more likely to say something false than George W. Bush.  In my opinion, Donald Trump is at least two orders of magnitude more likely to say something false than George W. Bush.

I repeat, in my opinion.
Glenn Kessler, Michelle Ye Hee Lee and Meg Kelly have been compiling data on Trump's first six months as president that supports that second opinion:
So it goes with Trump, the most fact-challenged politician that The Fact Checker has ever encountered.  As part of our coverage of the president’s first 100 days, The Fact Checker team (along with Leslie Shapiro and Kaeti Hinck of the Post graphics department) produced an interactive graphic that displayed a running list of every false or misleading statement made by the president.  He averaged 4.9 false or misleading claims a day.

Readers encouraged us to keep the list going for the president’s first year.  So at the six-month mark, the president’s tally stands at 836 false or misleading claims.  That’s an average of 4.6 claims a day, not far off his first 100-day pace.

We decided to compile this list because the pace and volume of the president’s misstatements means that we cannot possibly keep up.  This interactive database helps readers quickly search a claim after they hear it, because there’s a good chance he has said it before.  But the database also shows how repetitive Trump’s claims are.  Many politicians will drop a false claim after it has been deemed false.   But Trump just repeats the same claim over and over.
The whole article is definitely worth reading, and those with some ambition will want to look at that interactive graphic, and try out the database.

(I have some sympathy for Kessler, as I do for anyone who has to keep cleaning up after Trump.  Although Kessler is occasionally wrong, he's the best fact checker I know of.)
- 2:36 PM, 21 July 2017   [link]


The Review Of "Dunkirk" In USA Today Made Many People Chuckle:   For example.

And others wonder just how much history our kids are learning in high school and college.
- 10:52 AM, 21 July 2017   [link]


How Should Jeff Sessions Take That Attack From Donald Trump?  As a compliment.
Sessions, 70, drew the ire of the president after he stepped away from the investigation in March.  The inquiry has since broadened and dominated much of Trump’s presidency, sweeping up top White House officials and family members of the president.

“Sessions should have never recused himself, and if he was going to recuse himself, he should have told me before he took the job and I would have picked somebody else,” Trump told the New York Times on Wednesday.  “It’s extremely unfair, and that’s a mild word, to the president.”
Sessions is acting as an officer of the law, not Trump's private attorney — which is what our Attorney General should be doing.
- 9:36 AM, 21 July 2017   [link]


Dr. Seuss, Political Cartoonist:  In January, The Atlantic described that part of his career, illustrating the article with some of his more famous political cartoons.

Remarkably, his humor comes through, even on some of the darkest subjects.

(More of his political cartoons.)
- 7:25 AM, 21 July 2017   [link]


The ObamaCare Repeal/Replace Failure Was Predictable:  In fact, in June I said the failure was likely (and have thought so since Trump's election).

There are two fundamental reasons for my skepticism:  First, the policy problems are fiendishly difficult.  For example, suppose you decide that competition among doctors would reduce their fees, and so you enlarge medical schools, and allow more doctors to immigrate to this country.  There are places in the United States where having many doctors (especially surgeons) has led, not to more competition and lower fees, but to more unnecessary treatment, and higher costs.

Or, take an opposite example; instead of relying on markets to improve treatment and lower costs, suppose you try to improve treatment with better bureaucracies, with, for example, consolidated treatment centers, as ObamaCare does.  There is evidence that those consolidations have increased costs, especially in rural areas.

Second, the politics of the problems are awful, especially for elected Republicans.   Most of us are happy with our coverage and the fact that someone else — more and more our fellow taxpayers — is paying our bills.  Any reform that controls costs will upset some of the special deals that so many of us have.

And to make it worse, it isn't just money; any serious reform will cost some lives.   Example:  Suppose a state decides to tighten its vaccination requirements for schoolchildren.  Those additional vaccinations will save some lives — and cause a few deaths, because of those rare bad reactions to vaccinations.  The saved lives will be invisible except to medical statisticians; the deaths will be publicized.

Because of those two great problems, an informed and prudent political leader would tackle health care reform very carefully.

And definitely would not rush any reform, without thinking it through, and preparing the public.
- 4:10 PM, 20 July 2017   [link]


Parents of Finicky Eaters Will Appreciate this cartoon.

And every American should know about it.
What White called "the spinach joke"[5] quickly became one of the New Yorker cartoon captions to enter the vernacular (Peter Arno's "Back to the drawing board!" and Peter Steiner's "On the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog" being other examples), becoming a bon mot of the 1930s, with continued, though diminishing, use into the early 21st century.[6]
Now, wasn't that more fun than another post on a political failure?

(I will do a few failure posts soon, but I am tired of having to imitate Cassandra so often.)
- 2:29 PM, 20 July 2017   [link]


Here's Hoping That John McCain Recovers From His Cancer:   It will be a tough fight.
- 7:02 AM, 20 July 2017   [link]


Location, Location, Location?  People in real estate usually use that phrase to explain why one particular property is more valuable than another.  But it works the other way, too.
- 9:57 AM, 19 July 2017   [link]


"A Mobile Phone On Jupiter"  South Africa is building a radio telescope array, MeerKAT, so sensitive that it could detect a "mobile phone on Jupiter", according to a BBC story (probably this one) I saw this morning.

The scientists aren't planning to use it for that, of course, but that will give you an idea of just how sensitive the array will be — and why they are building it out in the desert, away from mobile phones, and other human sources of radio waves.

(For the record:  It would take a very special mobile phone to survive on Jupiter.)
- 6:19 AM, 18 July 2017   [link]


The Seattle Times Went Looking For More Evidence On The Sex Abuse Accusations Against Seattle Mayor Ed Murray:  And found it.
An Oregon child-welfare investigator concluded that Ed Murray sexually abused his foster son in the early 1980s, leading state officials to assert that “under no circumstances should Mr. Murray be certified” as a foster parent in the future, according to public records obtained by The Seattle Times.

The investigation by Oregon Child Protective Services (CPS) of Jeff Simpson’s allegations determined them to be valid — meaning the agency believed Murray sexually abused Simpson, the records show.

“In the professional judgement of this caseworker who has interviewed numerous children of all ages and of all levels of emotional disturbance regarding sexual abuse, Jeff Simpson has been sexually abused by … Edward Murray,” CPS caseworker Judy Butler wrote in the May 1984 assessment.
. . .
Still, the newly disclosed records reveal that a Multnomah County prosecutor withdrew a criminal case against Murray because of Simpson’s troubled personality, not because she thought he was lying.

“It was Jeff’s emotional instability, history of manipulative behavior and the fact that he has again run away and made himself unavailable that forced my decision,” Deputy District Attorney Mary Tomlinson wrote.
(Multnomah County includes Portland, and a few suburbs.)

So there is more evidence to support the accusations, enough so that two mayoral candidates — so far — have called on Murray to resign.

(In April, I implied that news organizations might have found more evidence in 2008, if they had tried harder.

As I write, neither the New York Times nor the Washington Post has picked up this story, though the Guardian has.)
- 8:35 AM, 17 July 2017   [link]


Not-So-Shaggy Dog Story:  Jones went into a movie theater to watch an adventure film.  When his eyes had adjusted to the darkness, he noticed a large dog seated next to the man in front of him.

The dog was clearly understanding the movie.  He growled softly when the villain spoke, and wagged his tale during the funny parts.

Finally, Jones leaned forward and tapped the man on the shoulder.  Jones said, "Pardon me, sir, but I can't get over your dog's behavior."

The man turned around and said, "Frankly it surprises me, too.  He hated the book."

(This is a modified version of Joke 49 in Isaac Asimov's Treasury of Humor.

Someone who knows current movies better than I do could make an even better version of the joke by using a specific movie, and telling it in the first person.  (You might want to start out by mentioning "companion" animals, to explain the presence of the dog.)  The punch line stays the same but is stronger, because the specifics leading up to it would make it more of a surprise.)
- 6:38 AM, 17 July 2017   [link]


Some People Don't Believe in genetics.

When that belief forces them to consider disagreeable possibilities.

As for me, I would not be surprised to learn, some time in the future, that geneticists had identified genes that make the Trump and Kennedy families less civilized than we would like.

(And genes that make, for instance, the Bush and Romney families more civilized than average.)

This is, granted, a very difficult scientific problem — but scientists have made some progress on it in recent years.  (If you are like me, you may find this fox example instructive.)
- 4:27 PM, 16 July 2017   [link]


A Triumph For Leftist Demonstrators, A Disaster For A University:  Almost everyone had lost within a year of that triumph.
COLUMBIA, Mo. — In the fall of 2015, a grassy quadrangle at the center of the University of Missouri became known nationwide as the command center of an escalating protest.

Students complaining of official inaction in the face of racial bigotry joined forces with a graduate student on a hunger strike.  Within weeks, with the aid of the football team, they had forced the university system president and the campus chancellor to resign.

It was a moment of triumph for the protesting students.  But it has been a disaster for the university.

Freshman enrollment at the Columbia campus, the system’s flagship, has fallen by more than 35 percent in the two years since.
It is likely that applications have fallen even more, that the university is now accepting students it would have rejected two years ago.

There were a few winners:  "Missouri also has appointed a chief diversity officer; promised to double the percentage of minority faculty members by 2020 and recruit more minority postdoctoral fellows; and is requiring diversity training for faculty and staff members and incoming students."

I hope you will not think me too cynical when I say that, for at least a few, those jobs were the point of the protests.

It is worth taking a few minutes to think about what lessons other university presidents are likely to draw from Missouri's experience.  I'm sorry to say this, but I think most of them will conclude that, if they face similar demonstrations, a quick, preemptive surrender is the best policy.

In the short term.

In the long term, even in the medium term, not so much.

(Anemona Hartocollis is a fine reporter; I linked to important articles she wrote on health costs here and here.)
- 3:58 PM, 16 July 2017   [link]


As We All Know, kids are often forgetful.
- 7:23 AM, 16 July 2017   [link]


Archives

June 2002
July 2002
August 2002
September 2002
October 2002, Part 1 and Part 2
November 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
December 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3

January 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
February 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
March 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
April 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2004, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2004, Part 1, Part 2. Part 3, and Part 4
October 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2005, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2006, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2007, Part 1 Part 2, and Part 3, and Part 4
June 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2008, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4
May 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3. and Part 4

January 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2012, Part 1, Part 2 Part 3, and Part 4
August 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3and Part 4
December 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2013, , Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4
March 2014, Part 1. Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2015, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2015, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2017, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
April 2017, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2017, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3






Coming Soon
  • Plan 17 Conservatives
  • FDR and Waterboarding
  • How Long Do Wars Last?
  • Carbon, Carbon Dioxide, and Crescent Wrenches
  • De-Lawyering and Attorney General McKenna


Coming Eventually
  • JFK and Wiretaps
  • Green Republicans
  • The Rise and Fall and Rise of Black Voting
  • Abortion, Cleft Palates, and Europe
  • Kweisi Mfume's Children
  • Public Opinion During Other US Wars
  • Dual Loyalties
  • The Power Index
  • Baby Dancing
  • Jocks, but no Nerds
  • The Four Caliphs




Best Posts


Books


Strange Obama


The Unknown Bush


University Reform


Uncorrected Mistakes


Vote Fraud


The Gang of Four


Articles


Assignment Desk
(What's This?)


Columns


Common Mistakes
(What's This?)


Chomsky Cult Program


*new