Last updated:
10:25 AM, 20 October 2017



Jim Miller on Politics

  Email:
jimxc1 at gmail.com



What's he reading? Francis Parkman.

News Compilers
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Atlantic Monthly
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El Universal
U. S. News
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Wall Street Journal
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References:

Adherents
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Census Quick Facts
Dave Leip's Election Atlas
FactCheck
Federal Statistics
How Stuff Works
NationMaster
Refdesk
Snopes
StateMaster
Tax Facts
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Smart Media
(Why These?)

*The American
The American Spectator
Michael Barone
City Journal
Commentary
FiveThirtyEight
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Michael Fumento
The Hill
Media Research
Michael Medved
New York Sun
Number Watch
PJ Media
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Roll Call
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Townhall
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Blogs
(Why These?)

My Group Blog:
Sound Politics

Northwest:


Chief Brief
Clear Fog Blog
Economic Freedom
Orcinus
Public Interest Transportation Forum
<pudge/*>
Northwest Progressive Institute
Seattle Bubble
West Sound Politics


Other US:


Ace of Spades HQ
Ann Althouse
American Thinker
Art Contrarian
Balloon Juice
Baseball Crank
La Shawn Barber
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Bleat
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Broadband Politics
Stuart Buck
Keith Burgess-Jackson
Chef Mojo
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*College Insurrection
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John Ellis
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Le-gal In-sur-rec-tion
Little Green Footballs
Megan McArdle
Michelle Malkin
Greg Mankiw
Marginal Revolution
Mazurland
Minding the Campus
The ModerateVoice
*The Monkey Cage Mudville Gazette
"neo-neocon"
Betsy Newmark
Newsbusters
No Watermelons Allowed
*The Optimistic Conservative
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Parapundit
"Patterico"
Daniel Pipes
Polipundit
Political Arithmetik
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Power and Control
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Dr. Sanity
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Screw Loose Change
Linda Seebach
Sense of Events
Joshua Sharf
Rand Simberg
Smart Politics
The Spirit of Enterprise
Stability For Our Time
*Strange Maps
The Strata-Sphere
Andrew Sullivan
Sweetness & Light
Taking Hayek Seriously
TalkLeft
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TaxProf
USS Neverdock
VDH's Private Papers
Verum Serum
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Washington Monthly
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Winds of Change
Meryl Yourish
zombietime


Canadians:


BlazingCatFur
Colby Cosh
Five Feet of Fury
Kate McMillan
Damian Penny
Bruce Rolston


Latin America:


Babalú
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The Devil's Excrement
Venezuela News and Views


Overseas:


"Franco Aleman"
Bruce Bawer
Biased BBC
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*Andrew Bolt
Peter Briffa
Brussels Journal
Butterflies and Wheels
Crooked Timber
Davids Medienkritik
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EU Referendum
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Harry's Place
Mick Hartley
Oliver Kamm
JG, Caesarea
*Le Monde Watch
¡No-Pasarán!
Fredrik Norman
Melanie Phillips
*Political Betting
John Ray
samizdata
Shark Blog
Natalie Solent
Somtow's World
Bjørn Stærk
Laban Tall
*David Thompson
Michael Yon

Science Blogs:
The Blackboard
Cliff Mass Weather
Climate Audit
Climate Depot
Climate Science
*Judith Curry
Future Pundit
Gene Expression
The Loom
In The Pipeline
Roger Pielke Jr.
Real Climate
A Voyage To Arcturus
Watts Up With That?

Media Blogs:
Andrew Malcolm
Dori Monson
David Postman
Rhetorical Ammo
Tierney Lab
*White House Dossier

R-Rated:
Horse's A**
Huffington Post

Emeritus:
Alien Corn
Villainous Company
*new



Pseudo-Random Thoughts

More Evidence That Vladimir Putin is a fox.
Russian President Vladimir Putin called on Americans to show more respect for their president in response to a question posed to him at the Valdai International Discussion Club in Sochi, Russia, on Thursday.
Now that is sly — and yes, I do think that he probably set up that question in advance.

Putin does understand how to divide us.
- 10:25 AM, 20 October 2017   [link]


Salman Rushdie Understands This:  But most "mainstream" journalists don't, or are ignoring it for the moment.

In an interview that I saw on BBC America — probably this one — the writer was asked whether President Obama, who Rushdie has supported, had contributed to the growing divisions in the United States.  Rushdie admitted that Obama had, as any honest, and reasonably well-informed, person would.

That should be obvious to anyone who recalls that Obama is a disciple of the late Saul Alinsky, or remembers the sermons preached in Obama's Chicago church.

It was a little less obvious watching Obama's behavior as president, since he preferred, for tactical reasons, to let his allies and subordinates do most of the dirty work of division.   Donald Trump is an open, crude divider, while Obama is a sneaky, sophisticated divider, but the results are similar.

And that is why the linking of an Obama speech on unity to a George W. Bush speech on the same subject, as so many journalists are doing — for example — is so dishonest.

Bush was saying what he had said before, and what he had, on the whole, practiced as president; in arguing for unity, Obama was cynically ignoring his own record of division, a record that in many ways paved the way for Donald Trump.

Moreover, Bush made his speech to a nonpartisan group; Obama made his at a campaign rally, an inherently divisive event.

That last should have been enough of a clue for our "mainstream" journalists — but it hasn't been in the stories I have seen.

(Here's a notorious example of Obama's divisiveness.   At one time I was surprised that his administration had picked this fight; now I think they did it deliberately.)
- 9:50 AM, 20 October 2017   [link]


As Far As I Know, Password Proliferation hasn't reached the level shown in the "Pepper . . . and Salt" cartoon, but I am not as in touch with new technology, as I once was.

(I think the cartoon will be up until about noon, PDT, but I could be wrong, either way.)
- 6:24 AM, 20 October 2017   [link]


Did Trump's Change In Tactics Speed Up The Campaign Against ISIS?  Jonathan Tobin says yes, but, in my opinion, makes too strong an argument.

The coalition against ISIS was making steady progress before Donald Trump took office, notably in Mosul.
The offensive, dubbed Operation "We Are Coming, Nineveh" (قادمون يا نينوى; Qadimun Ya Naynawa),[67][68] began on 16 October 2016, with forces besieging ISIL-controlled areas in the Nineveh Governorate surrounding Mosul,[69][70][71] and continued with Iraqi troops and Peshmerga fighters engaging ISIL on three fronts outside Mosul, going from village to village in the surrounding area in the largest deployment of Iraqi troops since the 2003 invasion of Iraq.[72]  The battle was also the world's single largest military operation in nearly 15 years.[clarification needed][44]

At dawn on 1 November 2016, Iraqi Special Operations Forces entered the city from the east.[73]  Met with fierce fighting, the government advance into the city was slowed by elaborate defenses and by the presence of civilians,[74] but the Iraqi Prime Minister declared "full liberation of eastern side of Mosul" on 24 January 2017.[75]  Iraqi troops began their offensive to recapture western Mosul on 19 February 2017.[76]
So Tobin is wrong to speak of a "stalemate" before the change in tactics, but right, in my opinion, to say that the campaign has gone faster thanks to Trump's more aggressive tactics.

Some critics would probably argue that the change in tactics has meant more civilian casualties.  I would agree, as long as they add this qualifier: in the short run.

(What were the changes in tactics?  As far as I can tell from rather sketchy press accounts, the US made our targeting quicker by, for instance, giving forward air controllers more direct authority.  This would have made our air strikes significantly more effective.)
- 3:30 PM, 19 October 2017   [link]


Worth Study:  John Solomon and Alison Spann's article, "FBI uncovered Russian bribery plot before Obama administration approved controversial nuclear deal with Moscow".
Before the Obama administration approved a controversial deal in 2010 giving Moscow control of a large swath of American uranium, the FBI had gathered substantial evidence that Russian nuclear industry officials were engaged in bribery, kickbacks, extortion and money laundering designed to grow Vladimir Putin’s atomic energy business inside the United States, according to government documents and interviews.

Federal agents used a confidential U.S. witness working inside the Russian nuclear industry to gather extensive financial records, make secret recordings and intercept emails as early as 2009 that showed Moscow had compromised an American uranium trucking firm with bribes and kickbacks in violation of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, FBI and court documents show.
You don't have to be a conspiracy theorist to be fascinated by some of the people connected, however indirectly, to this scandal.

I should mention this possible reason for the delays in bringing charges and publicizing these crimes:  The FBI may have been protecting that confidential informant.  Even if that is so, some in Congress should have been informed.

(If this seems familiar, it's because Peter Schweizer and the New York Times dug up part of the story some years ago.)
- 10:24 AM, 19 October 2017   [link]


Lawyer Bob Ferguson, Limousine Chaser?  A few, not very respectable, lawyers are called "ambulance chasers" because they rush to the scenes of accidents, hoping to profit from them.*

It occurs to me that we need a similar term for Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson, and others like him.  In this last year, he's brought lawsuits against the Trump administration 17 times — so far.
In the past week and a half alone, Attorney General Bob Ferguson has challenged the Trump Administration three separate times in court.  On October 9, it was over women’s access to contraceptive care; on October 12, it was a motion in the ongoing fight against Trump’s hotly-contested travel ban; on October 13, it was over the administration’s decision to end an Affordable Care Act (ACA) funding provision.

By this point, of course, we can hardly be surprised.  Before we even knew for sure that President Donald Trump would win the election, Ferguson was already promising to sue the guy.   “If the truly unthinkable were to happen, I want to tell you who the most important officials in the country are:  Your Democratic attorneys general,” he said on election night.  “We can hold your elected officials accountable to the rule of law.”
There are cynics who think Ferguson is less interested in the "rule of law" than in gaining political power, for himself.

(Ferguson is expected to run for governor in 2020.  He probably believes that his toughest fight will be in the top-two primary, not the general election.)

But we should not miss out on the fundamental issue:  Ferguson is attempting to delay or reverse the results of a national election, on issue after issue.  It is possible that he has legitimate grounds for his suits in a few of those cases.  But in all 17?  That seems unlikely.

(*Old story, worth sharing:  Year ago, I recall reading about a sting operation in New Jersey, where the local bus companies were being hit by false claims in accidents.   Whenever there was even a small accident, at least a few people would rush to jump on the bus, and pretend they had been there during the accident.  Often it was cheaper to pay them off than fight them in court.

Finally, the insurance companies and police got tired of these scams and arranged one or more fake accidents.  When the fraudsters rushed to get on the buses, the authorities were watching and, if I recall correctly, filming.

A little bit of thought will show you that that scam required at least the tacit cooperation of some ambulance-chasing lawyers.

Some will wonder whether Ferguson is doing his actual job, as attorney general.  He may be, but I have seen no evidence that he is.

Bob Ferguson)
- 6:17 AM, 19 October 2017   [link]


Basketball Players Will Appreciate the current "Pepper . . . and Salt" cartoon.

(It might be replaced, within a few hours.)
- 6:16 AM, 19 October 2017   [link]


Reverse Coattails In 2016 (5):  Like Wisconsin, Michigan is one of the swing states that, very narrowly (10,704 votes), gave Donald Trump his electoral vote majority.

In the states I looked at previously, there were Republican governors or Senators running last year, so we could make a direct comparison between their votes and Trump's.  (So far, they always ran ahead of him.)

Michigan elects governors in off years, and there was no Senate race there last year, so we can't make the same comparison.  We can compare Trump's vote in Michigan to the total for House seats, and for a change the result is ambiguous:  The Republican candidates received fewer votes than Trump (2,243,402-2,279,543), but had a higher margin (49,422-10,704).

The safest conclusion is that there were neither big coattails nor big reverse coattails.

Incidentally, I think that Barack Obama might have won the state for Clinton, if he had worked hard to increase black turnout.

(George W. Bush lost Michigan in 2000 and 2004.  John McCain and Mitt Romney both lost the state.

You can find the earlier posts in this series here, here, here, and here.)
- 1:47 PM, 18 October 2017   [link]


We're Number Two!  (At best.)

Not in potential power, but in actual effective power, says the Economist.
Donald Trump is no less wowed.  The Washington Post quotes him as saying that China’s current leader, Xi Jinping, is “probably the most powerful” China has had in a century.

Mr Trump may be right.  And were it not political suicide for an American president to say so, he might plausibly have added:  “Xi Jinping is the world’s most powerful leader.”  To be sure, China’s economy is still second in size to America’s and its army, though rapidly gaining muscle, pales in comparison.  But economic heft and military hardware are not everything.  The leader of the free world has a narrow, transactional approach to foreigners and seems unable to enact his agenda at home.  The United States is still the world’s most powerful country, but its leader is weaker at home and less effective abroad than any of his recent predecessors, not least because he scorns the values and alliances that underpin American influence.
That's an unpleasant conclusion, but it is essentially the same as the one I reached months ago.

And I would go even further.  I think that the United States lost ground strategically, because of Barack Obama's failures.  It is still an open question which man's failures will cost us more, in the long run.

(Does President Xi ever wonder how he was so lucky as to get first Obama, and then Trump, as adversaries?  Probably not; judging by his public statements, he thinks it shows the superiority of his system.)
- 10:03 AM, 18 October 2017   [link]


#%&*#!  There, now I feel better, having replaced the expletives with the usual cartoon substitutes.

Why did I feel the need to express myself so vigorously?

Because we are spending our time discussing small problems, and ignoring big ones.  For example, if you look at memeorandum right now, you'll see article after article, post after post, discussing whether President Trump said the right things to a widow.  (He probably didn't, and is probably lying about what he said.)

And nothing about President Xi Jinping's speech.
China has entered a "new era" where it should "take centre stage in the world", President Xi Jinping says.
It should no longer be news that Trump often says hurtful things, but that "centre stage" claim should alarm every thinking American — and everyone who hopes for peace in the world.
- 9:27 AM, 18 October 2017   [link]


We Can All Understand Why A Young Man might yield to this temptation.
- 6:35 AM, 18 October 2017   [link]


Why Did We Drain All Those Swamps Back In The 20th Century?  Not to get rid of alligators, in spite of that wonderful line.*

Alligators aren't really that big a problem, once you know where they live, and how they behave.  And we drained a lot of swamps that are hundreds, even thousands, of miles from any alligators.

As I understand it, we did it for two main reasons, to reclaim land for farming, and to destroy places where disease-carrying mosquitoes could breed.  We were fighting hunger and malaria (and other diseases), not alligators.

One of the most famous, perhaps the most famous, swamp drainer was the Italian dictator, Benito Mussolini.  He made new farmland, and reduced disease.

So, if you are going to use the draining-the-swamp metaphor — I would use it sparingly, if at all — visualize mosquitoes and diseases, not alligators.

(*Here's one version:  When you are hip deep in alligators, it is no time to start thinking about draining the swamp.

As I've mentioned before, one of the main reasons Aedes aegypti is such a nasty problem is that it doesn't need swamps to breed.)
- 2:29 PM, 17 October 2017   [link]


Worth Buying:  Today's New York Times, if only for Dennis Overbye's article, "LIGO Detects Fierce Collision of Neutron Stars for the First Time".
Astronomers announced on Monday that they had seen and heard a pair of dead stars collide, giving them their first glimpse of the violent process by which most of the gold and silver in the universe was created.

The collision, known as a kilonova, rattled the galaxy in which it happened 130 million light-years from here in the southern constellation of Hydra, and sent fireworks across the universe.  On Aug. 17, the event set off sensors in space and on Earth, as well as producing a loud chirp in antennas designed to study ripples in the cosmic fabric.  It sent astronomers stampeding to their telescopes, in hopes of answering one of the long-sought mysteries of the universe.

Such explosions, astronomers have long suspected, produced many of the heavier elements in the universe, including precious metals like gold, silver and uranium.  All the atoms in your wedding band, in the pharaoh’s treasures and the bombs that destroyed Hiroshima and still threaten us all, so the story goes, have been formed in cosmic gong shows that reverberated across the heavens.
As luck would have it, this explosion reached Earth just as astronomers had the right detectors in place to see, and some would say, to "hear" it.

(Quibble:  The Big Bang produced a smidgen of lithium, as well as hydrogen and helium.

"kilonova")
- 10:14 AM, 17 October 2017   [link]


When I Saw The Headline, I Cracked Up:  And then didn't bother to read the opinion piece.

Here's the headline:  "Trump takes wrecking ball to the swamp that is D.C."

If that puzzles you, try visualizing it; you could swing a wrecking ball at a swamp for days, making big splashes, but never changing the swamp in any significant way.

I fear that may be all too accurate as a description of Trump's efforts, but I doubt that's what Charles Hurt intended to say.

(If I could draw, I would draw a bullfrog operating a wrecking ball in a swamp.)
- 7:02 AM, 17 October 2017   [link]


Democrats Won't Like this Michael Ramirez cartoon.

But they should realize it could have been worse; Ramirez could have drawn Barack Obama giving Weinstein that big hug.
- 6:22 AM, 17 October 2017   [link]


The Jones Act Waiver for Puerto Rico didn't last long.
The White House has let a 10-day shipping waiver expire for Puerto Rico, meaning foreign ships can no longer bring aid to the hurricane-ravaged island from U.S. ports.

A spokesperson for the Department of Homeland Security confirmed on Monday that the Jones Act waiver, which expired on Sunday, will not be extended.
So the waiver lasted from 29 September through 8 October.

Whatever the original intentions, the Jones Act has become a classic piece of special interest legislation, benefiting a few at the expense of many.  The biggest losers are probably ordinary people in Puerto Rico and Hawaii.

Senators John McCain and Mike Lee have introduced legislation to abolish the Act, which is a good idea (though I can't help noticing that neither comes from a state with a big shipping industry).

(Jones Act)
- 4:30 PM, 16 October 2017   [link]


Peggy's Puzzling Pronouncement:  Peggy Noonan fascinates me; she often writes columns that combine obvious blunders with real insights, insights that often make her columns worth reading, in spite of the blunders.

In last weekend's Wall Street Journal, she managed to combine an insight with a blunder — in a single paragraph.
In early March I met with a dozen Republican U.S. senators for coffee as part of a series in which they invite writers, columnists and historians to share what’s on their mind.  The consuming topic was the new president.  I wrote some notes on the train down, seized by what I felt was the central challenge Republicans on Capitol Hill were facing.  The meeting was off the record, but I think I can share what I said.  I said the terrible irony of the 2016 campaign was that Donald Trump was the only one of the 17 GOP primary candidates who could have gone on to win the presidency.  Only he had the uniqueness, the outside-the-boxness to win.  At the same time, Mr. Trump was the only one of the 17 who would not be able to govern, for reasons of temperament, political inexperience, and essential nature.  It just wouldn't work.
That the other candidates would be better presidents (though several of them have their own problems) should be obvious by now to everyone except willfully-blind Trumpistas, and, of course, Trump himself.

That isn't a deep insight, but it is an insight.

But Noonan preceded that with an incredible blunder.  I know of no reason to think that most of the other Republican candidates would not have defeated Hillary Clinton.  That's what the polls showed at the time, and, even better, that's what the election results showed in state after state, with Trump running behind the Republican candidates just below him on the tickets.

(Peggy Noonan)
- 8:17 AM, 16 October 2017   [link]


Here's A Republican Who Believes In Reaching Out:   Way out.
- 7:13 AM, 16 October 2017   [link]


Walmart Is Coming Through For Puerto Rico:  The company is helping meet one of the biggest needs, bottled water.
The sight of water delivery trucks outside stores is prompting long lines to form.  Crushes of customers snatch up new shipments even before store employees can restock empty shelves.  Of 10 stores in San Juan that were visited on Tuesday and Wednesday, only one had bottled water: a Walmart store where two brawny men were loading cases of water directly off a shipping pallet into the shopping carts of people who had lined up in the back of the store.  Signs posted on the walls declared a limit of one case per group.

Phillip Keene, director of corporate communications for Walmart, said that during the storm, the company had safeguarded pallets of water on cargo ships that were sent out to sea and away from Maria’s path.  Since then, the company has been delivering about six million bottles of water a week to Puerto Rico from the continental United States, and it is making plans to double the supply as soon as possible.  Mr. Keene added that before the storm, Walmart stores in Puerto Rico generally sold about 300,000 cases of water a week, almost all of it bottled from sources on the island.
Good for Walmart, both for the water, and the intelligent planning.
- 3:02 PM, 15 October 2017   [link]


Hilarious:  Today is the first day of National Character Counts Week.

As proclaimed by Donald J. Trump.

Sadly, I think many Trumpistas will not get that joke.  Which is too bad, because it is a pretty good joke, just as it was when Bill Clinton was making those proclamations.

(I understand the feelings of those who take this seriously, but I wish they, too, would appreciate the absurdity.)
- 2:34 PM, 15 October 2017   [link]


Archives

June 2002
July 2002
August 2002
September 2002
October 2002, Part 1 and Part 2
November 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
December 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3

January 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
February 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
March 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
April 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2004, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2004, Part 1, Part 2. Part 3, and Part 4
October 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2005, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2006, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2007, Part 1 Part 2, and Part 3, and Part 4
June 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2008, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4
May 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3. and Part 4

January 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2012, Part 1, Part 2 Part 3, and Part 4
August 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3and Part 4
December 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2013, , Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4
March 2014, Part 1. Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2015, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2015, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2017, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
April 2017, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2017, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3






Coming Soon
  • Plan 17 Conservatives
  • FDR and Waterboarding
  • How Long Do Wars Last?
  • Carbon, Carbon Dioxide, and Crescent Wrenches
  • De-Lawyering and Attorney General McKenna


Coming Eventually
  • JFK and Wiretaps
  • Green Republicans
  • The Rise and Fall and Rise of Black Voting
  • Abortion, Cleft Palates, and Europe
  • Kweisi Mfume's Children
  • Public Opinion During Other US Wars
  • Dual Loyalties
  • The Power Index
  • Baby Dancing
  • Jocks, but no Nerds
  • The Four Caliphs




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