Last updated:
9:15 AM, 26 January 2015



Jim Miller on Politics

  Email:
jimxc1 at gmail.com



What's he reading? Francis Parkman.

News Compilers
(Why These?)

A&L Daily
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egopnews.com
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Jewish World Review
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Lucianne
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Monsters and Critics
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Real Clear Politics
SciTech Daily
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Big Media
(Why These?)

Atlantic Monthly
BBC
CNN
Chosen Ilbo
*Daily Mail (UK)
*Deutsche Welle
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Guardian (UK)
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Der Spiegel
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Times (UK)
El Universal
U. S. News
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Wall Street Journal
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Washington Post
Washington Times


References:

Adherents
Bureau of Labor Statistics
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Dave Leip's Election Atlas
FactCheck
Federal Statistics
How Stuff Works
NationMaster
Refdesk
Snopes
StateMaster
Tax Facts
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Smart Media
(Why These?)

ABC News Note
*The American
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Michael Barone
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Charles Krauthammer
Media Research
Michael Medved
New York Sun
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PJ Media
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Roll Call
Spinsanity
Townhall
The Weekly Standard


Blogs
(Why These?)

My Group Blog:
Sound Politics

Northwest:


The American Empire
AndrewsDad
Chief Brief
Clear Fog Blog
Coffeemonkey's weblog
Croker Sack
"DANEgerus"
Economic Freedom
Federal Way Conservative
Freedom Foundation
Hairy Thoughts
Huckleberry Online
Andy MacDonald
NW Republican
Orcinus
Public Interest Transportation Forum
<pudge/*>
Northwest Progressive Institute
*Progressive Majority
Matt Rosenberg
Seattle Blogger
Seattle Bubble
Washington Policy Center
West Sound Politics
Zero Base Thinking


Other US:


Ace of Spades HQ
Alien Corn
Ann Althouse
American Thinker
The Anchoress
Armies of Liberation
Art Contrarian
"Baldilocks"
Balloon Juice
Baseball Crank
La Shawn Barber
Beldar
Bleat
Big Government
Bookworm Room
Broadband Politics
Stuart Buck
Keith Burgess-Jackson
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Chef Mojo
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Discriminations
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Daniel W. Drezner
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Election Law
John Ellis
Engage
Dean Esmay
Gary Farber
Fausta
FiveThirtyEight
Flares into Darkness
Flopping Aces
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Gateway Pundit
Grasping Reality With Both Hands
Keith Hennessey
Hugh Hewitt
Siflay Hraka
Instapundit
Iowahawk
Joanne Jacobs
Jeff Jarvis
The Jawa Report
Brothers Judd
JustOneMinute
Kausfiles
Kesher Talk
Le-gal In-sur-rec-tion
Little Green Footballs
Megan McArdle
Michelle Malkin
Greg Mankiw
Marginal Revolution
Mazurland
Minding the Campus
The ModerateVoice
*The Monkey Cage Mudville Gazette
"neo-neocon"
Betsy Newmark
Newsbusters
No Watermelons Allowed
Ambra Nykola
*The Optimistic Conservative
The Ornery American
OxBlog
Parapundit
"Patterico"
Daniel Pipes
Polipundit
Political Arithmetik
Political Calculations
Pollster.com
Power and Control
Power Line
Protein Wisdom
QandO
Radio Equalizer
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Riehl World View
Right Wing News
Rightwing Nuthouse
Dr. Sanity
Scrappleface
Screw Loose Change
Linda Seebach
Sense of Events
Joshua Sharf
Rand Simberg
Smart Politics
The Spirit of Enterprise
Stability For Our Time
*Strange Maps
The Strata-Sphere
Andrew Sullivan
Don Surber
Sweetness & Light
Taking Hayek Seriously
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TaxProf
USS Neverdock
VDH's Private Papers
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Winds of Change
Meryl Yourish
zombietime


Canadians:


BlazingCatFur
Colby Cosh
Five Feet of Fury
Kate McMillan
Damian Penny
Bruce Rolston


Latin America:


Babalú
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The Devil's Excrement
Venezuela News and Views


Overseas:


"Franco Aleman"
Bruce Bawer
Biased BBC
Tim Blair
*Andrew Bolt
Peter Briffa
Brussels Journal
*Bunyipitude
Butterflies and Wheels
Crooked Timber
Davids Medienkritik
Egyptian Sand Monkey
EU Referendum
Greenie Watch
Guido Fawkes
Harry's Place
Mick Hartley
Oliver Kamm
JG, Caesarea
*Le Monde Watch
¡No-Pasarán!
Fredrik Norman
Melanie Phillips
John Ray
samizdata
Shark Blog
Natalie Solent
Somtow's World
Bjørn Stærk
Laban Tall
*David Thompson
Michael Yon
This is Zimbabwe

Science Blogs:
The Blackboard
Cliff Mass Weather
Climate Audit
Climate Depot
Climate Science
*Judith Curry
Future Pundit
Gene Expression
The Loom
In The Pipeline
Roger Pielke Jr.
Real Climate
A Voyage To Arcturus
Watts Up With That?

Media Blogs:
Andrew Malcolm
Dori Monson
David Postman
Rhetorical Ammo
Tierney Lab
*White House Dossier

R-Rated:
Horse's A**
Huffington Post

*new



Pseudo-Random Thoughts

Mitch McConnell Promised That He Would Allow The Senate To Vote:  He's keeping that promise.
The new Republican-controlled Senate has already voted on more amendments in one week than the Democratic-controlled Senate considered in all of 2014.

Republican senators applauded the feat when Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) announced it on the Senate floor.

“We’ve actually reached a milestone here that I think is noteworthy for the Senate.  We just cast our 15th roll-call vote on an amendment on this bill, which is more votes — more roll-call votes on amendments than the entire United States Senate [did] in all of 2014,” he said.
It seems odd to celebrate a legislative body actually voting on amendents, but sometimes a return to normal is worthy of celebration.

Reid's stratedy may have been an error, in the long run.

Non-voting was an issue in Alaska last November, as Republicans pointed out that the incumbent Democratic senator, Mark Begich, had not gotten a vote on "a single amendment he sponsored during his six-year career".

He lost.  The margin was close enough — 2.13 percent — so that those non-votes may be part of the reason he lost.

(I haven't seen any good explanation for Reid's grip on power in the Demcoratic caucus  I was more than half expecting that he and Nancy Peolosi would draw challenges after their election defeats, but neither did.).
- 9:15 AM, 26 January 2015   [link]


Boxes For Babies:  The BBC describes a traditional Finnish program.
For 75 years, Finland's expectant mothers have been given a box by the state.  It's like a starter kit of clothes, sheets and toys that can even be used as a bed.  And some say it helped Finland achieve one of the world's lowest infant mortality rates.

It's a tradition that dates back to the 1930s and it's designed to give all children in Finland, no matter what background they're from, an equal start in life.
. . .
Mothers have a choice between taking the box, or a cash grant, currently set at 140 euros, but 95% opt for the box as it's worth much more.

The tradition dates back to 1938.  To begin with, the scheme was only available to families on low incomes, but that changed in 1949.
It sounds like a good idea, though better suited to small, relatively homogeneous countries like Finland, than to the United States.

(Incidentally, the cardboard box sounds slightly safer to me than the traditional cribs used here in the United States.)
- 8:34 AM, 26 January 2015   [link]


Greece Has Just Given Power To The Radical Left:  Literally.  The name of the winning party, SYRIZA, means "Coalition of the Radical Left".

SYRIZA came in first, with about 36 percent of the popular vote.  Under a peculiar Greek rule — the party with the most popular votes gets a bonus of 50 seats in the 300 seat parliament — that was almost enough to give them a majority.  Right now, they have 149 seats.  (The news reports I have seen describe the results as "preliminary", which suggests they might change, slightly.)

So, SYRIZA is forming a coalition with another party, the "conservative" Independent Greeks, somewhat to my surprise.  (I had half expected them to get at least tacit support from the Communist Party of Greece.)
The far-left Syriza party, the winner of Greece's election, has formed an anti-austerity coalition with a right-wing party, the Greek Independents.

The coalition will have a comfortable majority in the new parliament.

Syriza leader Alexis Tsipras has vowed to renegotiate Greece's bailouts, worth €240bn (£179bn; $268bn).

European Commission head Jean-Claude Juncker congratulated Mr Tsipras while reminding him of the challenge of "ensuring fiscal responsibility".
There is an ancient quip that, if you owe a small amount of money to a bank, the bank owns you, but if you owe a large amount, you own the bank.

In the next few months we will see whether Greece owes enough money to the European Union so that it can re-negotiate their agreement and write off much of their debt.  I am inclined to think that they will not be able to get substantial relief, because those who run the EU and finance it worry about "contagion", about the possibility that other debtor nations will seek similar deals.

(Oddly enough, almost no one in power in the EU, or in Greece, seems willing to consider what seems to me to be the obvious solution:  Greece should go formally bankrupt, and leave the European Union.  Belonging to the EU has been terrible for Greece, first by tempting the Greeks with easy credit, and then by imposing an austerity regime that has caused considerable suffering.

A note on terminology:  I write SYRIZA, since it is an acronym like NATO.  The BBC, following a practice more common in Britain than here, capitalizes only the first letter of the party's name.

It is possible that the Greek Communists and the Golden Dawn party are not considered fit for membership in coalitions, in Greece.  That would make it harder, after some elections, to form a majority coalition.)
- 8:01 AM, 26 January 2015   [link]


Here's a fine Scott Stantis cartoon.

And I was simply astonished to see it, yesterday, in the Seattle Times.  If I were trying to imitate their choices of editorial cartoons, I would follow this procedure:  Look for a boring, soft-left cartoon and, above all, avoid one that criticizes President Obama or Senator Patty Murray.  And I think I would come close to their choices about 90 percent of the time.  So this one was an absolute surprise.

(The Times does publish his comic strip, "Prickly City".)
- 6:53 AM, 26 January 2015   [link]


There's A Market For Pro-American War Movies:  A big market, as "American Sniper" just demonstrated.
"So-called ‘sand movies,’ the term Hollywood sometimes uses for films set in Afghanistan and Iraq, have a terrible box office track record,” noted the New York Times.  Or rather, they had a terrible box office track record.  The release of American Sniper, a biopic about Iraq war veteran and legendary Navy SEAL Chris Kyle, has changed all that.

The film, which opened wide January 16, shattered the record for the largest opening weekend of a film released in January, a month traditionally considered a graveyard for ticket sales.  The film pulled in $105 million its first weekend against its $60 million budget—and the film that previously held the record for largest January weekend is Avatar, the highest-grossing picture in history.  Already, American Sniper has the markings of a cultural phenomenon.  In exit polls conducted by CinemaScore, movie-goers rated the film A+.  Phil Contrino, chief analyst at BoxOffice.com, has attributed the film’s success to a massive outpouring of favorable attention on social media.

Naturally, the commercial and artistic success of American Sniper—it received six Oscar nominations—has liberal Hollywood deeply conflicted, and pockets of the left outraged.
(Those other "sand movies", as you probably know, and as Mark Hemingway goes on to discuss, are almost all anti-American.)

The outrage is easy to understand; the conflict, harder.  If Hollywood were only interested in making money, then they would welcome this success, and would be planning, right now, to make similar movies in order to get a share of this untapped audience.

But those who run Hollywood (and almost all of those who work there) are not only interested in making money.  They are also on the left, politically and culturally.  And so there are some messages they do not want to put out, however profitable they might be, and however indirectly the message is presented.

(And, to be fair, the producers may no longer have many of the the directors and writers who once made such movies for them.)

This is not a new conclusion; Michael Medved came to it in his book, Hollywood vs. America, first published more than two decades ago.  And I suspect that others came to the same conclusion before he did.

But we see again just how hard it is for Hollywood to accept that conclusion.

(Brook Barnes, writing in the New York Times article that Hemingway quotes, begins by almost accepting the conclusion in my title, but then dances away from it, and ends by discussing the clever marketing used to sell the picture.)
- 3:12 PM, 23 January 2015   [link]


Surrounded By Cartoons:  This won't surprise those who have their own sites, but it might surprise others.

Whenever I link to a New Yorker cartoon, as I did yesterday, for the next day or two I'll see ads for that cartoon, and others, at many of the sites I visit.  For instance, yesterday Drudge was showing me at least different eight cartoons at a time.

It's a logical enough strategy, I suppose.  Since I searched for the cartoon at a site that sells it, I might be interested in buying it.  I don't particularly mind; there are worse things to look at than cartoons I have seen before.  But I do wonder, from time to time, how many I would see if I ever bought one of the cartoons.

(As I assume almost all of you have figured out, I use this indirect way of showing cartoons out of respect for copyrights — and the lawyers who enforce them.  And if one of you happen to buy one of the cartoons I link to, that's fine with me.)
- 8:07 AM, 23 January 2015   [link]


Did Bill Clinton Know That He Was Riding on the "Lolita Express"?
Just released flight records show Harvard law professor Alan Dershowitz has been flying with convicted pedophile Jeffrey Epstein on the financier's private jet dubbed the 'Lolita Express' since as early as 1997, despite public statements that they were only acquaintances.

The high-profile lawyer has been distancing himself from Epstein ever since a young woman named Virginia Roberts filed a lawsuit claiming she was recruited to work as a 'sex slave' for Epstein when she was just 15, naming both Dershowitz and Prince Andrew as two of her molesters.

The flight records, obtained by Gawker, also show former President Bill Clinton rode on Epstein's jet at least 11 times, and often with two of Epstein's female associates believed to have provided the dozens of underage girls to their boss and his well-connected friends.
(Emphasis added.)

As smart as Clinton is about some things, it is hard to believe that he didn't at least suspect that Epstein might be involved with underage girls.

(For the record:  Although there seems to be no doubt about Epstein's taste for underage girls, I would not automatically accept all the charges made by one of them, now.

Vladimir Nabokov's novel is not as famous as it once was, but I am sure Bill Clinton would know all about it.  I recall reading parts of it, years and years ago, but not finishing it, partly out of disgust.)
- 7:27 AM, 23 January 2015   [link]


If You Were A Smart Aleck Kid (or just know a few), you'll like today's New Yorker cartoon.
- 4:16 PM, 22 January 2015   [link]


More On The Death Of The Argentine Prosecutor, Alberto Nisman:   Here's a sober BBC Q&A on what is known publicly, so far.

For example, it does not appear to be locked-room mystery, as early accounts said.
Investigators said there were three possible ways to enter the apartment:
  • Main door: operated by an electronic code and found locked
  • Service door: according to the locksmith, this was closed but unlocked.  The key was in the lock inside the apartment
  • Air conditioning tunnel: narrow passageway housing air conditioning units linking Mr Nisman's apartment to that of a neighbour
They mention, but do not give much space to the most sensational development, yet.
The death of a prosecutor investigating the bombing of a Jewish community center was not a suicide, as was initially reported, Argentine President Cristina Fernandez said on Thursday.

Alberto Nisman, lead investigator into the 1994 attack on the AMIA Jewish center that killed 85 people, was found dead in his apartment late Sunday, a 22 caliber pistol by his side.
. . .
The government says two key witnesses in Nisman's case against the president had been falsely presented to him as state intelligence agents.

Fernandez said the deception discredited Nisman's charges against her and points to a conspiracy to smear her name.

"They used him while he was alive and then they needed him dead," she said in an open letter to the country, adding that his death was "sad and terrible."
I don't believe she has been specific about who "they" are, other than enemies of hers.
- 12:48 PM, 22 January 2015   [link]


The Air Has Certainly Gone Out Of That Story:  No, not the football story, this story.
Justice Department lawyers will recommend that no civil rights charges be brought against the police officer who fatally shot an unarmed teenager in Ferguson, Mo., after an F.B.I. investigation found no evidence to support charges, law enforcement officials said Wednesday.

Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. and his civil rights chief, Vanita Gupta, will have the final say on whether the Justice Department will close the case against the officer, Darren Wilson.  But it would be unusual for them to overrule the prosecutors on the case, who are still working on a legal memo explaining their recommendation.

A decision by the Justice Department would bring an end to the politically charged investigation of Mr. Wilson in the death of 18-year-old Michael Brown.  The Missouri authorities concluded their investigation into Mr. Brown’s death in November and also recommended against charges.
(Emphasis added.)

Why was this story released now, before the official report, and attributed only to unnamed "law enforcement officials"?

Since I don't have any contacts inside the Holder Justice Department, I can't say for sure.   I can offer you this speculation, which is consistent with the known facts:

The hyping of this story cost the Democrats votes last November.  I don't believe that the Obama-Holder-Sharpton team expected that.  But they recognized it, after the election, and are now cutting their losses.  By putting the story out in this way, they are trying to let their supporters down easy.  By putting it out at this time, they are hoping that it will get little attention — and whoever chose the time is probably delighted by the coverage that New England football story is getting.

This explanation is, admittedly, cynical.  But it is consistent with the stories from "mainstream" journalists before the election that the Obama administration believed that hyping Ferguson would motivate blacks to turn out and vote.  And experience has shown us that we should view everything that Sharpton does, and most of what Obama and Holder do, with a fair amount of cynicism.

(And that the damage done to Darrell Wilson?  I doubt that any of the three care one whit about that.  Wilson is, after all, a white working class man, which makes him guilty on three counts (in their eyes), regardless of what he may have done.)
- 8:39 AM, 22 January 2015   [link]


Americans Are, More And More, Tuning President Obama Out:   They aren't even bothering to watch his State of the Union speeches.
President Barack Obama‘s 2015 State of the Union address drew the lowest television viewership for any such speech in the last 15 years, according to new data from Nielsen.

The president’s Tuesday address was watched by 31.7 million viewers across 12 broadcast and cable networks that carried the speech live, despite a two-week campaign style tour and a social media blitz to drum up interest.
In this area and, I suspect, in most of the United States, our "mainstream" journalists promoted the speech heavily.

For me, the most interesting part of this brief article is not the text, but the pattern you can see in the graph at the top, showing viewership "as a share of the population".

In his last three State of the Union speeches, Obama had fewer viewers, as a share of the population, than Bill Clinton and George W. Bush had for any of their speeches, even their final speeches.  About 11 percent listened to Clinton in 2000; about 12 percent listened to Bush in 2008.  Obama drew a smidgen over 10 percent in 2013 and 2014, and right at 10 percent this year.

That's not very good for a man many touted as a great speaker
- 7:42 AM, 22 January 2015   [link]


Here's An Investment Opportunity:  Though it may be more suitable for enthusiasts than profit seekers.
Startups are famous for setting big, hairy goals.  Carmine “Tom” Biscardi wants to catch Sasquatch—and is planning an initial public offering to fund the hunt.

Mr. Biscardi and his partners hope to raise as much as $3 million by selling stock in Bigfoot Project Investments.  They plan to spend the money making movies and selling DVDs, but are also budgeting $113,805 a year for expeditions to find the beast.  Among the company’s goals, according to its filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission: “capture the creature known as Bigfoot.”
. . .
The SEC said it doesn’t comment on specific companies and filings.  But in a 2013 investor bulletin, the agency said its staff “does not evaluate the merits of any IPO or determine whether an investment is appropriate for any investor.”  Instead, its efforts are focused on making sure the companies comply with SEC disclosure requirements and accounting rules.
Note, please, that I am not planning to put my own money into this venture.  And wouldn't be, even if I were an active investor, which I haven't been, for years.
- 2:31 PM, 21 January 2015   [link]


How Petty Was Obama's State Of The Union Speech?  This petty.
President Obama made no mention Tuesday night of Sen. Mitch McConnell’s recent ascension to majority leader, even though he will likely play a major role in congressional negotiations this year.

Obama made a point of congratulating John Boehner (R-Ohio) for winning the Speaker’s gavel at the start of his 2011 State of the Union address, weeks after Republicans ousted Democrats from the House majority.

This year, however, Obama ignored the Republican takeover the Senate — which was fueled by constant attacks on his record, including his administration’s handling of the Ebola epidemic and the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria.
Obama did a little better in 2011, congratulating, at least perfunctorily, Speaker Boehner, but even then he didn't come close to George W. Bush's gracious tribute to Nancy Pelosi, in 2007.

Obama isn't a good loser — or a good winner, for that matter.
- 2:08 PM, 21 January 2015
More:  James Taranto does what The Hill (and I) should have done, giving the presidential reactions in 1995, 2007, and 2011 to their electoral "thumpings" in the years before.  Congratulating the opposition party is not just good manners; it is also an admission that the voters have asked for a change in course.  This time, Obama was unwilling to make that admission, unwilling to say that he had heard what the voters were trying to tell him.
- 3:43 PM, 22 January 2015   [link]


Senator Rand Paul Hires Another Interesting Aide:  After his experience with Jack Hunter, the "Confederate Avenger", I would have thought that Paul would be more careful about his hires, that at least he would avoid people with public embarrassments in their backgrounds.

But Marianne Copenhaver is at least as interesting as Hunter, as these examples will show you:
A blogger who has been hired to do social media work for Sen. Rand Paul’s (R., Ky.) likely presidential campaign is not a fan of “stupid armchair jingoes” in the Republican Party, says Sen. John McCain (R., Ariz.) “will use anything to satisfy his blood lust,” and wants Edward Snowden to receive a Nobel Peace prize, according to her Facebook page.

Marianne Copenhaver, also known as “Libertarian Girl,” joined Paul’s team a few months ago to do contract work, the Daily Beast has reported.

Copenhaver’s recent Facebook posts are filled with vehement attacks on the GOP’s foreign policy on Iran, Russia, the Islamic State, Syria, and Israel.
. . .
She also criticized drones as “Devastating U.S. War Crimes” and promoted the anti-Israel group Breaking the Silence.
(I reversed the order of those two blocks of quotes, because they make more sense that way.)

These two hires will make most of us wonder how Paul picks his aides.  Is he just careless in checking their backgrounds?  Or does he not see anything wrong with a person (Hunter) who fantasizes about assassinating Lincoln, or a person (Copenhaver), who hates most of the leaders of the Republican Party?

(Ever since Rand Paul came on the scene, I have wondered whether he shared some of Ron Paul's less pleasant opinions — but was too canny to say so, publicly.   These two hires have given me even more reason to wonder about that question.)
- 1:50 PM, 21 January 2015   [link]


Two Prominent People Took My Advice and skipped the State of the Union speech.
For some, all the hubbub was a bit much. Rep. Rick Larsen (D-Wash.) stayed home to watch the speech from his couch: “More comfortable, fewer distractions.”  And Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg appeared to be resting her eyes during portions of the speech.
Oh, I know, Congressman Larsen says he watched the speech, and Justice Ginsburg probably heard parts of it.  But each avoided as much of it as they could in the circumstances, just as I advised yesterday.
- 8:58 AM, 21 January 2015   [link]


Worth Watching:  NBC correspondent Richard Engel, reacting to last night's State of the Union speech, destroys President Obama's claims of foreign policy successes.

Engel accuses Obama — though not in those words — of presenting a series of pleasant fantasies, rather than the unpleasant facts.

(Brian Williams's lead-in and reaction are worth watching, if only to illustrate how a famous "journalist" avoids following up on unpleasant news.  The NBC anchor began with a list of problems, but was obviously not expecting Engel's harsh critique.  So, instead of following up with a few questions, he made a silly remark about seagulls, followed that with an empty generality, and then switched away to a safer correspondent, Andrea Mitchell.

What questions would I have asked Engel?  I would have started with the obvious question, one I have asked before:  How much of what President Obama said does he believe?  Is Obama living in a fantasy world, or is he just trying to con us?  I suppose that what he says is a mixture of the two, but for most of his speeches I find it hard to guess what the proportions are, though I have thought hard about this question for years.)
- 7:53 AM, 21 January 2015   [link]


Archives

June 2002
July 2002
August 2002
September 2002
October 2002, Part 1 and Part 2
November 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
December 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3

January 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
February 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
March 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
April 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2004, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2004, Part 1, Part 2. Part 3, and Part 4
October 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2005, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2006, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2007, Part 1 and Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2007, Part 1 Part 2, and Part 3, and Part 4
June 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2008, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4
May 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3. and Part 4

January 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2012, Part 1, Part 2 Part 3, and Part 4
August 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3and Part 4
December 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2013, , Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4
March 2014, Part 1. Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
January 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4






Coming Soon
  • Plan 17 Conservatives
  • FDR and Waterboarding
  • How Long Do Wars Last?
  • Carbon, Carbon Dioxide, and Crescent Wrenches
  • De-Lawyering and Attorney General McKenna


Coming Eventually
  • JFK and Wiretaps
  • Green Republicans
  • The Rise and Fall and Rise of Black Voting
  • Abortion, Cleft Palates, and Europe
  • Kweisi Mfume's Children
  • Public Opinion During Other US Wars
  • Dual Loyalties
  • The Power Index
  • Baby Dancing
  • Jocks, but no Nerds
  • The Four Caliphs




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