Jim Miller on Politics

Last updated:
4:27 PM, 19 June 2018



Jim Miller on Politics

  Email:
jimxc1 at gmail.com



What's he reading? Francis Parkman.

News Compilers
(Why These?)

A&L Daily
Drudge
Hot Air
Jewish World Review
Lucianne
Mediaite
memeorandum
*newser
Orbusmax
Rantburg
Real Clear Politics
SciTech Daily
Yahoo


Big Media
(Why These?)

Atlantic Monthly
Axios
BBC
CNN
Chosen Ilbo
Daily Mail (UK)
Deutsche Welle
Fox News
Globe and Mail (CA)
Guardian (UK)
Investor's Business Daily
Le Figaro (FR)
Le Monde (FR)
The Local (Sweden)
National Review
New York Times
The New Yorker
Politico
Seattle PI
Seattle Times
Slate
Slashdot
The Spectator (UK)
Der Spiegel
Telegraph (UK)
Times (UK)
U. S. News
USA Today
Wall Street Journal
Washington Examiner
Washington Post
Washington Times


References:

Adherents
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Census Quick Facts
Dave Leip's Election Atlas
FactCheck
Federal Statistics
How Stuff Works
NationMaster
Refdesk
Snopes
StateMaster
Tax Facts
Unionstats
Wikipedia


Smart Media
(Why These?)

*The American
The American Spectator
Michael Barone
City Journal
Commentary
FiveThirtyEight
Front Page Magazine
Michael Fumento
The Hill
Media Research
Michael Medved
New York Sun
Number Watch
PJ Media
Public Interest
Roll Call
Spinsanity
Townhall
The Weekly Standard


Blogs
(Why These?)

My Group Blog:
Sound Politics

Northwest:


Economic Freedom
Orcinus
Public Interest Transportation Forum
<pudge/*>
Northwest Progressive Institute
Seattle Bubble


Other US:


Ace of Spades HQ
Ann Althouse
American Thinker
Art Contrarian
Balloon Juice
Baseball Crank
Beldar
Bookworm Room
Chicago Boyz
Classical Values
*College Insurrection
Daily Pundit
Discriminations
Econlog
Election Law
Fausta
Flares into Darkness
Flopping Aces
The Long War Journal
Keith Hennessey
Hugh Hewitt
Instapundit
Iowahawk
Joanne Jacobs
Jeff Jarvis
The Jawa Report
Brothers Judd
JustOneMinute
Kausfiles
Kesher Talk
Le-gal In-sur-rec-tion
Little Green Footballs
Megan McArdle
Michelle Malkin
Greg Mankiw
Marginal Revolution
Mazurland
Minding the Campus
The ModerateVoice
*The Monkey Cage Mudville Gazette
"neo-neocon"
Betsy Newmark
Newsbusters
No Watermelons Allowed
The Ornery American
Parapundit
"Patterico"
Daniel Pipes
Polipundit
Political Arithmetik
Political Calculations
Power Line
QandO
Right Wing News
Scrappleface
Screw Loose Change
Linda Seebach
Sense of Events
Joshua Sharf
Rand Simberg
Smart Politics
The Spirit of Enterprise
*Strange Maps
The Strata-Sphere
Sweetness & Light
TalkLeft
Talking Points Memo
TaxProf
VDH's Private Papers
Verum Serum
Volokh Conspiracy
Washington Monthly
Wizbang
Matt Welch
Winds of Change
Meryl Yourish
*Zip Dialog
zombietime


Canadians:


BlazingCatFur
Colby Cosh
Five Feet of Fury
Kate McMillan
Damian Penny
Bruce Rolston


Latin America:


Babalú
Caracas Chronicles
The Devil's Excrement
Venezuela News and Views


Overseas:


Bruce Bawer
Biased BBC
Tim Blair
*Andrew Bolt
Brussels Journal
*The Conservative Woman
Crooked Timber
Davids Medienkritik
Egyptian Sand Monkey
EU Referendum
Greenie Watch
Guido Fawkes
Harry's Place
Mick Hartley
Oliver Kamm
JG, Caesarea
*Le Monde Watch
¡No-Pasarán!
Fredrik Norman
Melanie Phillips
Political Betting
John Ray
samizdata
Shark Blog
Natalie Solent
Somtow's World
Laban Tall
*David Thompson
Michael Yon

Science Blogs:
The Blackboard
Cliff Mass Weather
Climate Audit
Climate Depot
Climate Science
*Judith Curry
Future Pundit
Gene Expression
The Loom
In The Pipeline
Roger Pielke Jr.
Real Climate
A Voyage To Arcturus
Watts Up With That?

Media Blogs:
My Northwest

R-Rated:
Horse's A**
Huffington Post

Emeritus:
Alien Corn
Dr. Sanity
Villainous Company
*new



Pseudo-Random Thoughts

It Is Possible I Have Got This Wrong, but it looks as if Donald Trump is complaining because Canadians are buying shoes in the United States — and not paying Canadian taxes on them.

I can understand why that might bother Prime Minister Trudeau, but not why it would bother President Trump.

Canada has a national sales tax, as well as sales taxes in most provinces.   Combined, the total can be as high as 15 percent.

(A few years ago, Canadians were flocking to border towns in Washington state to buy coats.  In order to beat Canadian taxes, they would wear old coats down, and then discard them at the malls.  If I recall correctly, there were so many discarded coats at some of the malls that they installed special bins for them.)
- 4:27 PM, 19 June 2018   [link]


The Venezuelan Stock Exchange Continues To Soar:  Here are — I believe — current quotes.

And here are some numbers for comparison, from April.

No doubt that spectacular rise shows the wise policies of the Chavista regime.

All right, I couldn't resist that, having heard, so many times, similar claims about the American stock market from both Republicans and Democrats.

Actually, if I had to guess I'd say that some speculator or speculators are betting that the regime will collapse, relatively soon.
- 3:47 PM, 19 June 2018   [link]


Men Don't Always Make the best fashion choices.
- 10:16 AM, 19 June 2018   [link]


Four People Are Known To Have Died In The Osaka Earthquake:  Three elderly people, and one nine-year-old girl, crushed by a falling wall as she was walking to school.

That is a surprisingly small number, considering the strength of the earthquake and the number of people living in that area.  If a similar earthquake had struck a populated area of Iran, Afghanistan, or Pakistan, thousands, perhaps tens of thousands, would have died.

It's been almost a century since the Great Tokyo Earthquake, which killed more than 100,000 people.  Since then, the Japanese have learned, earthquake by earthquake, how to minimize the death tolls, and the property damage.

From what I can tell, earthquake-prone areas in the United States have learned the same lessons in the same ways, and in about the same time period.

(As I was watching NHK World this morning, I learned that there was an immediate flare-up of suspicions against foreigners after this earthquake, just as there had been in 1923.  This time the xenophobia has not had the deadly consequences it did almost a century ago.)
- 2:15 PM, 18 June 2018   [link]


"Air Conditioning!"  That's what a new apartment building in downtown Kirkland is advertising.  People in most of the country would be surprised to see that as a special feature; people in a few parts would be astonished.

But, in fact, in most summers in this area, air conditioning is only needed for about ten to fifteen days during our summers.  (And I wouldn't be surprised to learn that central heating is not needed in most homes in Hawaii.)

Unfortunately, today, tomorrow, and Wednesday are likely to be among those days in which air conditioning would be welcome, so you may not see many late afternoon and evening posts here in the next few days.

(If you are curious, the building advertising that special feature is the Voda apartments.  It is next to the Kirkland Transit Center.  I have been told that rents range from $2700 to $3000 a month, so they don't do much directly to increase the supply of affordable housing here.

The Kirkland Transit Center is just the main bus stop in Kirkland.  It would be convenient for people who regularly commute by bus to downtown Seattle.  As far as I know it hasn't become a crime magnet the way transit centers often do, but I am rarely there in the evenings, and haven't been there at night for years.)
- 11:21 AM, 18 June 2018   [link]


From The Current "Pepper . . . And Salt", an honest car salesman.
- 9:07 AM, 18 June 2018   [link]


Worth Reading:  Senator Marco Rubio's essay, "Fathers Deserve More Than Stuff For Father’s Day.  They Deserve Respect".
An Internet search for “Father’s Day 2018” brings up a top hit: “20 Last-Minute Father’s Day Gifts That Are Amazon Prime-Eligible.”   Now, like most dads, I’m not one to complain about receiving gifts (especially when they involve a good weekend of fishing), but something is wrong when popular culture understands the obligations of Father’s Day as nothing more than a 30-minute phone call and shipping your dad something Amazon’s website said were “Dad’s Favorites.”

Like so many other things in our culture today, the commercialization of this holiday obscures its true meaning.  Father’s Day is about so much more than store sales and cheesy coffee mugs. It is, to borrow the words a resolution President Calvin Coolidge once signed on its celebration, a day “to impress upon fathers the full measure of their obligations,” and remind ourselves of the importance of fatherhood to our country.
I would guess that Rubio wrote this, hoping to publish it in a major newspaper.  If so, it's unfortunate than none of them picked it up.

(Marco Rubio)
- 5:33 PM, 17 June 2018   [link]


Blobfish Basketball:  Now this is more to my tastes than all the talk shows.

Even though neither man is a skilled basketball player.

(I know I am not being realistic, but I continue to hope for the mud-wrestling contest.

Blobfish)
- 2:58 PM, 17 June 2018   [link]


Steve Bannon Absolutely Cracked Me Up with this joke.

He delivered it well, too.  Could he be hoping to be a regular on Saturday Night Live?
- 2:18 PM, 17 June 2018   [link]


Need A Key For That Merkel/Trump Picture?   Here's one from the BBC.

Along with some alternative pictures from other nations — pictures that have very different emotional impacts.
- 4:11 PM, 15 June 2018   [link]


"Worst (Real) Name For A Repeat Drug Offender"?  I can't recall a worse one.

By way of Charles Lipson, from whom I borrowed the post title.
- 12:59 PM, 15 June 2018   [link]


Which Party Is Winning The Race For The House?  Right now, the Democrats have a lead in the generic vote of 7.8 percent.

A few weeks ago, Trumpistas and some conservatives were touting the narrowing of that gap; now the gap has gone back to where it was.  (The narrowing, as you can see from the graph, was not caused by Republican gains, but by Democratic losses.)

I now think that the Democrats have at least a 90 percent chance of winning the popular vote for the House of Representatives.

(Republicans won the popular vote in 2016, 2014, 2010, 2004, 2002, 2000, 1998, and 1994, usually by very small margins.)

But I am not ready to estimate the chance that the popular victory will translate into Democratic control of the House.

(As I write, British bettors give the Democrats a 58.7 percent chance.

House of Representatives elections, 2018)
- 11:14 AM, 15 June 2018   [link]


This Week's Collection Of Cartoons from Politico.

My favorites:  Pat Bagley's blank check and Michael Ramirez's deep thoughts.

Andy Marlette hasn't forgotten North Korea's Gulag.
- 10:04 AM, 15 June 2018   [link]


President Legal Troubles (4):  The latest is a big one, politically.
The New York attorney general filed suit against President Donald Trump and his three eldest children Thursday (June 14), alleging "persistently illegal conduct" at the president's personal charity, saying Trump repeatedly misused the nonprofit organization - to pay off his businesses' creditors, to decorate one of his golf clubs and to stage a multimillion-dollar giveaway at his 2016 campaign events.

In the suit, filed Thursday morning, Attorney General Barbara Underwood asked a state judge to dissolve the Donald J. Trump Foundation.  She asked that its remaining $1 million in assets be distributed to other charities and that Trump be forced to pay at least $2.8 million in restitution and penalties.
. . .
In the suit, Underwood noted that Trump had paid more than $330,000 in reimbursements and penalty taxes since 2016.  New York state began looking into the Trump Foundation in response to an investigation by The Washington Post.
(Link added to the investigation.)

The findings of the Post investigation are striking.
[David] Fahrenthold covered the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign, reporting on the Donald J. Trump Foundation as well as claims Trump made as the 2016 Republican nominee that he had given away millions out of his own pocket.[9]  In May 2016, Fahrenthold began an effort to verify Trump had made these personal donations.  To solicit leads and for transparency, he periodically posted updates to Twitter via a hand-written list of charities he had contacted to ask whether they had received contributions from Trump, as well as the charities' responses.[9]  After four months, Fahrenthold and colleagues at the Post had contacted more than 400 major charities, with only one charity confirming they had received a personal donation from Trump between 2008 and May 2016 when Fahrenthold began publicly reporting on the question.[10]
Emphasis added.

I can't help thinking that the one contribution was a mistake.  And wondering whether Trump was having serious cash-flow problems, since earlier the Foundation had sometimes given actual donations.

(Earlier posts in this series here, here, and here.)
- 7:31 PM, 14 June 2018   [link]


By Now I Really Wish Jonathan Turley Hadn't Been So Right:  Last June, I quoted, approvingly, this Turley line:
Donald Trump continues to show a remarkable ability to bring out the worst in people — supporters and critics alike.
Yesterday, cartoonist David Horsey gave us an example of the latter.

I give cartoonists more latitude than journalists, but that cartoon does go too far.

(David Horsey)
- 9:29 AM, 14 June 2018   [link]


This Morning, "Pepper . . . And Salt" surprised me, and made me smile.
- 7:53 AM, 14 June 2018   [link]


How Good Are The Polls?  According to Nate Silver, about as good as they have been, historically.
But here’s a stubborn and surprising fact — and one to keep in mind as midterm polls really start rolling in:  Over the past two years — meaning in the 2016 general election and then in the various gubernatorial elections and special elections that have taken place in 2017 and 2018 — the accuracy of polls has been pretty much average by historical standards.

You read that right.  Polls of the November 2016 presidential election were about as accurate as polls of presidential elections have been on average since 1972.   And polls of gubernatorial and congressional elections in 2016 were about as accurate, on average, as polls of those races since 1998.
That certainly surprised me, since polling has gotten harder to do during that time, as response rates went down.  Somehow the pollsters have managed to compensate for that decline.

If you are wondering which polls to trust — to some extent — you'll want to look over the latest grades FiveThirtyEight has given American pollsters.
- 4:11 PM, 13 June 2018   [link]


"Fact-Checking President Trump’s Claims About The North Korea Deal"  As you should expect by now, Glenn Kessler found a number of falsehoods.

Here's my favorite:
“We have a big trade deficit with Canada.  It is a surplus.  It is not a surplus.  It is either 17 or it could be 100.  I don’t know if you saw it.  We found it.  Perhaps they were trying to show the power they have.  It is close to $100 billion a year loss with Canada.”

This is false.  Our fact-check on this Four-Pinocchio Trump claim appeared on The Washington Post website during Trump’s news conference.  The reality:  The United States has a surplus, not a $100 billion trade deficit, with Canada.
Which beat out the last, only because I wrote about the United States surplus two days ago.

When I read that odd Trump statement on Canada, I came to this conclusion:  Trump does not know our trade balance with Canada — and does not care to know it.

The continuous stream of falsehoods from Trump has, no doubt, worn some people down.  Which is just what Trump wants.

We shouldn't give in to him, or to any other persistent liar.
- 2:04 PM, 13 June 2018   [link]


This Cartoon May Help Men understand why Kate Spade's death received so much coverage.

Or maybe not.

(And, yes, the cartoonist is a man.)
- 10:24 AM, 13 June 2018   [link]


Fun Reading:  Natalie Angier's article — in anticipation of Father's Day — on the Y chromosome.  (The print version has this headline:  "Men Are Different: Here's Y".)

These findings were a complete surprise to me:
As a sizeable percentage of men age, their blood and body cells begin to jettison copies of the Y chromosome, sometimes quickly, sometimes slowly.  That unfortunate act of chromosomal decluttering appears to put the men at a heightened risk of Alzheimer's disease, leukemia and other disorders.
And that wasn't the only surprise I found.

(In places, the article has the tone one might expect from a giggling adolescent.   I found that charming, considering the subject.

Natalie Angier)
- 8:18 PM, 12 June 2018   [link]


The "Decade Of The City" Is Ending Early:  Brookings demographer William Frey was surprised by this reversal of a trend.
Newly released census data for city population growth through 2017 show that what I and others previously heralded as the “decade of the city” may be less valid during the waning years of the 2010s.   While most big cities are still gaining population, the rates of that gain are falling off for many of them as the nation’s population shows signs of broad dispersal.
. . . .
Yet the pervasiveness of declining big city growth, which began to become evident with last year’s numbers, reflects a broader dispersal of the nation’s population—from large metropolitan areas to smaller ones, from cities to suburbs, and from the Snow Belt to the Sun Belt.
In some areas, including Seattle, there would have been more dispersal if public policies had not made it more difficult to escape the city and the inner suburbs.

By way of Orrin Judd.

(William Frey)
- 4:25 PM, 12 June 2018   [link]


It's Of No Great Importance — but I can't help noticing that the South Korean flag looks Korean, while the North Korean flag looks as if it were copied from a certain American oil company.
- 1:27 PM, 12 June 2018   [link]


First Thoughts On The Trump-Kim "Deal"  From early reports, it looks like the earlier agreements with North Korea, only worse.  In those agreements, the North Koreans got tangible things immediately, in return for promises to behave better in the future.  Promises they broke.

Some will say that at least the two leaders are talking to each other, instead of insulting and threatening each other.  And I could understand, and even sympathize with that argument — if it weren't for the fact that I suspect this was Kim's plan all along.

And for me, that is more than counter-balanced by Trump's failure to consult with the South Korean president before calling off our joint military exercises.  (And I suspect that Trump did not even raise the Japanese abductee issue, as he had promised to do.)

Yesterday, John Ziegler made this gloomy prediction.  So far, I haven't seen any reason to think that Ziegler will be proved wrong.

(I did like Trump's joke; as you probably know, he said the two-page agreement is "comprehensive".)
- 9:55 AM, 12 June 2018   [link]


The Current "Pepper . . . And Salt" made me laugh.
- 9:21 AM, 12 June 2018   [link]


Archives

June 2002
July 2002
August 2002
September 2002
October 2002, Part 1 and Part 2
November 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
December 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3

January 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
February 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
March 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
April 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2004, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2004, Part 1, Part 2. Part 3, and Part 4
October 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2005, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2006, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2007, Part 1 Part 2, and Part 3, and Part 4
June 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2008, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4
May 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3. and Part 4

January 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2012, Part 1, Part 2 Part 3, and Part 4
August 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3and Part 4
December 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2013, , Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4
March 2014, Part 1. Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2015, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2015, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2017, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
April 2017, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2018, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2018, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2018, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2018, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2018, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2018, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3






Coming Soon
  • Plan 17 Conservatives
  • FDR and Waterboarding
  • Carbon, Carbon Dioxide, and Crescent Wrenches


Coming Eventually
  • JFK and Wiretaps
  • Green Republicans
  • The Rise and Fall and Rise of Black Voting
  • Abortion, Cleft Palates, and Europe
  • Kweisi Mfume's Children
  • Public Opinion During Other US Wars
  • Dual Loyalties
  • The Power Index
  • Baby Dancing
  • Jocks, but no Nerds
  • The Four Caliphs




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Vote Fraud


The Gang of Four


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Chomsky Cult Program


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