Last updated:
2:58 PM, 6 February 2016



Jim Miller on Politics

  Email:
jimxc1 at gmail.com



What's he reading? Francis Parkman.

News Compilers
(Why These?)

A&L Daily
Drudge
Hot Air
Jewish World Review
Lexis-Nexis
Lucianne
Mediaite
memeorandum
Monsters and Critics
*newser
Orbusmax
Rantburg
Real Clear Politics
SciTech Daily
Yahoo


Big Media
(Why These?)

Atlantic Monthly
BBC
CNN
Chosen Ilbo
*Daily Mail (UK)
*Deutsche Welle
Fox News
Globe and Mail (CA)
Guardian (UK)
Investor's Business Daily
Le Figaro (FR)
Le Monde (FR)
The Local (Sweden)
National Review
New York Times
The New Yorker
Politico
Seattle PI
Seattle Times
Slate
Slashdot
The Spectator (UK)
Der Spiegel
Telegraph (UK)
Times (UK)
El Universal
U. S. News
USA Today
Wall Street Journal
Washington Examiner
Washington Post
Washington Times


References:

Adherents
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Census Quick Facts
Dave Leip's Election Atlas
FactCheck
Federal Statistics
How Stuff Works
NationMaster
Refdesk
Snopes
StateMaster
Tax Facts
Unionstats
Wikipedia


Smart Media
(Why These?)

ABC News Note
*The American
The American Spectator
Michael Barone
City Journal
Commentary
Front Page Magazine
Michael Fumento
The Hill
Media Research
Michael Medved
New York Sun
Number Watch
PJ Media
Public Interest
Roll Call
Spinsanity
Townhall
The Weekly Standard


Blogs
(Why These?)

My Group Blog:
Sound Politics

Northwest:


The American Empire
AndrewsDad
Chief Brief
Clear Fog Blog
Coffeemonkey's weblog
Croker Sack
"DANEgerus"
Economic Freedom
Federal Way Conservative
Freedom Foundation
Hairy Thoughts
Huckleberry Online
Andy MacDonald
NW Republican
Orcinus
Public Interest Transportation Forum
<pudge/*>
Northwest Progressive Institute
*Progressive Majority
Matt Rosenberg
Seattle Blogger
Seattle Bubble
Washington Policy Center
West Sound Politics
Zero Base Thinking


Other US:


Ace of Spades HQ
Alien Corn
Ann Althouse
American Thinker
The Anchoress
Armies of Liberation
Art Contrarian
"Baldilocks"
Balloon Juice
Baseball Crank
La Shawn Barber
Beldar
Bleat
Big Government
Bookworm Room
Broadband Politics
Stuart Buck
Keith Burgess-Jackson
*Bush Center
Chef Mojo
Chicago Boyz
Classical Values
*College Insurrection
Confederate Yankee
Jules Crittenden
Daily Pundit
Discriminations
Gregory Djerejian
Daniel W. Drezner
Econlog
Econopundit
Election Law
John Ellis
Engage
Dean Esmay
Gary Farber
Fausta
FiveThirtyEight
Flares into Darkness
Flopping Aces
The Long War Journal
Gateway Pundit
Grasping Reality With Both Hands
Keith Hennessey
Hugh Hewitt
Siflay Hraka
Instapundit
Iowahawk
Joanne Jacobs
Jeff Jarvis
The Jawa Report
Brothers Judd
JustOneMinute
Kausfiles
Kesher Talk
Le-gal In-sur-rec-tion
Little Green Footballs
Megan McArdle
Michelle Malkin
Greg Mankiw
Marginal Revolution
Mazurland
Minding the Campus
The ModerateVoice
*The Monkey Cage Mudville Gazette
"neo-neocon"
Betsy Newmark
Newsbusters
No Watermelons Allowed
Ambra Nykola
*The Optimistic Conservative
The Ornery American
OxBlog
Parapundit
"Patterico"
Daniel Pipes
Polipundit
Political Arithmetik
Political Calculations
Pollster.com
Power and Control
Power Line
Protein Wisdom
QandO
Radio Equalizer
RedState
Riehl World View
Right Wing News
Rightwing Nuthouse
Dr. Sanity
Scrappleface
Screw Loose Change
Linda Seebach
Sense of Events
Joshua Sharf
Rand Simberg
Smart Politics
The Spirit of Enterprise
Stability For Our Time
*Strange Maps
The Strata-Sphere
Andrew Sullivan
Don Surber
Sweetness & Light
Taking Hayek Seriously
TalkLeft
Talking Points Memo
TaxProf
USS Neverdock
VDH's Private Papers
Verum Serum
Villainous Company
Volokh Conspiracy
Washington Monthly
Wizbang
Dr. Weevil
Matt Welch
Winds of Change
Meryl Yourish
zombietime


Canadians:


BlazingCatFur
Colby Cosh
Five Feet of Fury
Kate McMillan
Damian Penny
Bruce Rolston


Latin America:


Babalú
Caracas Chronicles
The Devil's Excrement
Venezuela News and Views


Overseas:


"Franco Aleman"
Bruce Bawer
Biased BBC
Tim Blair
*Andrew Bolt
Peter Briffa
Brussels Journal
Butterflies and Wheels
Crooked Timber
Davids Medienkritik
Egyptian Sand Monkey
EU Referendum
Greenie Watch
Guido Fawkes
Harry's Place
Mick Hartley
Oliver Kamm
JG, Caesarea
*Le Monde Watch
¡No-Pasarán!
Fredrik Norman
Melanie Phillips
*Political Betting
John Ray
samizdata
Shark Blog
Natalie Solent
Somtow's World
Bjørn Stærk
Laban Tall
*David Thompson
Michael Yon

Science Blogs:
The Blackboard
Cliff Mass Weather
Climate Audit
Climate Depot
Climate Science
*Judith Curry
Future Pundit
Gene Expression
The Loom
In The Pipeline
Roger Pielke Jr.
Real Climate
A Voyage To Arcturus
Watts Up With That?

Media Blogs:
Andrew Malcolm
Dori Monson
David Postman
Rhetorical Ammo
Tierney Lab
*White House Dossier

R-Rated:
Horse's A**
Huffington Post

*new



Fingernail Drives?  Included in my last Amazon order was a USB drive, of the kind that are often called "thumb drives", because in the past they were often about the size and shape of a thumb.  (I plan to use if for back-ups, and transferring files between computers.)

I didn't pay much attention to the choice, just looked for a 3.0 speed drive with more than enough space, from a company I'd heard of before.

So I was a little startled when it arrived, and I saw how small it is.  One side has about the same area as one of my fingernails — and I don't have especially big hands.  It's thicker than a fingernail, but only because the standard USB connector has to be thicker to fit in a standard USB slots.

Now I am going to have to be extra careful not to lose it, perhaps keeping it an a little dish on my desk.

(On a more serious note:  These little drives are probably driving security people nuts, since they are so easy to conceal, and so easy to copy sensitive files on to.  As I've said before, people with classified material on their PCs should consider having all USB ports sealed.  Or buying PCs without USB ports, assuming they are available.)
- 2:58 PM, 6 February 2016   [link]


Here's A Far-Sighted Campaign Platform:  While looking through a Sidney Harris cartoon collection, I ran across a cartoon showing a congressional candidate making this argument for electing him:
"Our sun is more than four billion years old, and has already reached about half its like expectancy.  It is now time to plan for the future of mankind, and a positive first step is the election of someone who is willing to face this vital problem . . . "
Incidentally, there are some thinkers who have been worrying about this problem for years, though I don't know of any who have run for Congress on that platform.

(I can imagine Newt Gingrich getting interested in it, though even Gingrich is too practical a politician to make it a big part of a campaign.  Physicist Stephen Hawking might be interested, though, as I understand it, he is far more concerned about more immediate problems, disasters that might hit us in the next thousand years.)
- 10:37 AM, 6 February 2016   [link]


British Bettors Turned Sharply against Trump this week.
On Monday Trump was a 50% shot on Betfair to be Republican nominee.  That's now 23.5%
Do take a look at the chart, which is remarkable.

Reminder:  :At this stage in the election cycle, I prefer betting markets to polls for primaries, and economic models to both for the general election.  Not that any of the three are very good at this stage, but the betting markets and the models are less bad than the polls.

Incidentally, at those Monday odds, I would have bet against Trump.

(Here's the Wikipedia article on Betfair.)
- 3:51 PM, 5 February 2016   [link]


Why Did Goldman Sachs Give Hillary Clinton $675,000?  (Directly, and, no doubt, more indirectly.)

The Wall Street Journal explains:
The long-standing arrangement between Democrats and financial giants like Goldman is that the politicians collect money and get to pose as populists by publicly attacking the big banks, and in return the big banks enjoy high regulatory barriers that prevent smaller firms from competing with them.  New York Sen. Chuck Schumer has perfected this bargain, which may have reached its zenith with the Dodd-Frank law of 2010, which brought Wall Street giants and Washington into a historically intimate embrace.

Yes, Wall Streeters love to complain about Dodd-Frank, but they also know it virtually ensures that no upstart finance company in the Midwest is going to challenge Goldman’s position in global finance.  “More intense regulatory and technology requirements have raised the barriers to entry higher than at any other time in modern history,” said Goldman CEO Lloyd Blankfein last year.  “This is an expensive business to be in, if you don’t have the market share in scale.”
(Emphasis added.)

Increased regulation almost always helps larger firms compete against their smaller rivals, so it shouldn't surprise us that those larger firms benefit from regulations they may have opposed, publicly.

No doubt the folks at Goldman Sachs don't believe what Clinton is now saying about being mean to the big banks, just as many economists don't believe what she is saying about free trade.

And both groups probably see her as an honest politician — by the definition often attributed to Simon Cameron.

(The Journal doesn't mention this, but they could:  Big banks invested a lot of money in Obama in the 2008 election and it has worked out reasonably well for them; their profits are up and, although =many have had to pay fines, few leaders have had to worry about prosecutions.)
- 8:39 AM, 5 February 2016   [link]


Pepper And Salt Reminds Us that global warming has advantages, too.
- 7:29 AM, 5 February 2016   [link]


Wondering Why The Polls Were Wrong, Wrong, Wrong In Iowa?   (As I warned you they might be.)

Here are some reasonable, if a bit rambling, speculations from Nate Cohn.

Here's what he thinks are the most important factors:
This year, there is extremely strong evidence to support the “late movement” scenario, some evidence to support the likely-voter problem and little evidence to support the sampling problem — even if it can’t be ruled out.
Late deciders are common in caucuses and primaries — and there is very little pollsters can do to poll them accurately.  Similarly, the turnout models that work in one caucus, one year, often fail in the next election, and there is little the polling firms can do about that, either.

All that said, this was one of the biggest misses, ever:
That 10-point swing was enough to make Mr. Trump’s defeat the biggest polling error in an early primary since Hillary Clinton defeated Barack Obama in New Hampshire in 2008.   But even that measure understates the extent that the polls misjudged Mr. Trump’s strength.

Mr. Trump was at 31 percent in the final polls, but finished with just 24 percent. In our data set of early primary polls from New Hampshire and Iowa since 2004, no candidate underperformed the final surveys by as much as Mr. Trump.
Should we conclude from this that Trump's support is overstated, nationally?  Probably not, but we should not see it as particularly stable, or a very good predictor for the primaries.
- 7:11 PM, 4 February 2016   [link]


Comrade Sanders Hasn't Learned Anything At Least Since He Became Mayor Of Burlington:  So says New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof, who began covering Sanders in 1981.
I admire Sanders’s passion, his relentless focus on inequality and his consistency.  When he was sworn in as mayor of Burlington, he declared: “The rich are getting richer, the poor are getting poorer and the millions of families in the middle are gradually sliding out of the middle class and into poverty.”  That has remained his mantra across 35 years
What Kristof quotes is the heart of Marxist doctrine (though Kristof doesn't seem to realize that).

We can go a little further back.  I would say that Sanders has held those views since 1961: that is, 55 years, at least.  (Probably since 1956, judging by his Wikipedia biography.)

One or two things have happened since 1961, the socialist Cambodian genocide, the collapse of the socialist Soviet Union, the economic failure of socialist Cuba, the rise of China, after the nation switched more to markets, and so on.

None of these events have shaken Sanders' Marxist faith — which is simultaneously impressive and depressing, impressive because of his ability to believe in spite of all the evidence around him, depressing because the people of Vermont kept electing him.

It is especially depressing because anyone who bothered to look at the evidence could have seen — since the 19th century — that the data did not support Marx's "scientific" theory.  In fact, one of Marx's followers, Eduard Bernstein, broke with Marx in part because of those failures.

Bernstein was closer to the truth than Marx in many ways, but that hasn't affected the beliefs of people like Comrade Sanders.

(Kristof is honest enough to note that Sanders hasn't accomplished much in all his years in Congress.

I was amused to learn that young supporters of Sanders often sing the Beetles song, "Revolution", not realizing that it is not pro-revolution.)
- 3:08 PM, 4 February 2016   [link]


Speaking of Movies, here's a bargain I ran across on Amazon three days ago: two great movies, "Casablanca" and "African Queen", for just $13.89.

(I was ordering a Blu-ray player and realized that I didn't have any test disks, so I was searching for a movie that I could stand watching — I'm not very good at watching movies or TV — and ran across this pair of classics.  At a bargain price.)
- 11:09 AM, 4 February 2016   [link]


Donald Trump As Norma Desmond?  Never having seen "Sunset Boulevard", the comparison didn't occur to me.

But the New York Daily News found some uncanny resemblances between what Trump says, and what the "washed up" star, Norma Desmond, says in the movie.

Examples:
Donald Trump, on 2016 Twitter: “Sorry losers and haters, but my I.Q. is one of the highest — and you all know it! Please don’t feel so stupid or insecure, it’s not your fault.”

Norma Desmond: “Shut up, I’m rich! I’m richer than all this new Hollywood trash! I’ve got a million dollars."
. . .
Donald Trump: “The media has not covered my long-shot great finish in Iowa fairly.   Brought in record voters and got second highest vote total in history!”

Norma Desmond: “There once was a time in this business when I had the eyes of the whole world!  But that wasn’t good enough for them, oh no!”
This comparison isn't going to please Trump, or his fans, but it struck me as too funny not to pass on.
- 10:53 AM, 4 February 2016   [link]


Today's New Yorker Cartoon is pretty good — but left me wondering what they had been talking about before that question.
- 5:51 AM, 4 February 2016   [link]


Venus Flytraps Can Count!?  They don't look as if they could, since they don't have fingers.

Venus flytrap

But this New York Times article says they can.
When an insect lands and bumps into trigger hairs on the surface of these leaves, the trap closes.   As digestive enzymes seep into the trap, it becomes what Dr. Hedrich calls a “green stomach,” and the prey is gradually turned into a nourishing soup.

Scientists knew that an insect had to bump the trigger hairs more than once to cause the trap to shut, presumably to avoid wasting energy by responding to random raindrops and windblown debris.

In the recent experiment, researchers studied how the plant was responding to movement of the trigger hairs, and determined that it was counting electrical pulses from them.
I suppose it depends on how you define "counting".  It's still an interesting finding, even if you think calling it counting is going a little too far.

(Back in September, I noted that some scientists suspect the plant has acquired some insect genes, presumably from prey.)
- 12:57 PM, 3 February 2016   [link]


If You Have Wondered Why I Routinely Warn You about political articles in Wikipedia, take a look at this entertaining and instructive New York Times article, "On Wikipedia, Donald Trump Reigns and Facts Are Open to Debate".

Two samples:
Ted Cruz’s birthplace became a presidential campaign issue last month when Donald J. Trump added it to his tool belt of attacks.

But it was hardly news to the readers and volunteer editors of Mr. Cruz’s Wikipedia page, where mentions of his Canadian birth have been added to, deleted or modified more than 600 times since 2009.
. . .
The online encyclopedia famously allows the public to edit it, but it also publishes reams of data about itself: about what articles used to say, who added or deleted passages and how many people read the articles.

Page-view statistics, for example, show that on some primary days, Wikipedia may be able to predict the winner.
Which is a lot cheaper than doing a formal poll.

There's much more, including the pictures of Donald Trump the contributors were fighting over.

(Here's my rule of thumb:  You can trust most scientific articles on Wikipedia — unless they are on some politically-charged subject, such as global warming.  Simple facts such as dates of births are usually correct in the political articles, but you should distrust and try to verify other claims.  Sometimes you will find that a footnoted source does not say what the text claims it says.  Historical articles tend to be in between, more trustworthy than political articles, but less so than scientific articles.)
- 9:34 AM, 3 February 2016   [link]


Can We Call Him Comrade?  Of course we can; it's still a mostly free country.

But let me put the question more precisely:  Is it fair to call presidential candidate Bernie Sanders "Comrade"?.  In the past, most journalists would have said no, that calling him "Comrade" implied he was a Communist.

But socialists of the non-communist variety often used "Comrade", too, and in the past socialist Sanders has shown a dismaying sympathy for Communist movements, and even Communist dictatorships.  He has not, to the best of my knowledge, ever said he was wrong then, and has since changed his mind.

And Sanders does, in his standard campaign speech, call for a "revolution" in America, mostly peaceful perhaps, though he doesn't add that adjective in the speeches I've heard.

So I do think it is fair to call him Comrade, Comrade Sanders if we are being formal, Comrade Bernie if we are being informal.

(Vermont is a small state, and so you could say that Sanders had Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn as a neighbor from 1976 to 1994.  As far as I know, Sanders never even attempted to meet his famous neighbor during all those years.

It would be great, by the way, if a "mainstream" reporter were to ask Comrade Sanders whether he had tried to meet the famous author and, if hot, why not.)
- 8:58 AM, 3 February 2016   [link]


Worth Reading:  Today's Washington Post editorial on another Obama foreign policy failure, his opening to Cuba.
Yet there is scant evidence so far of a sea change in Cuba — perhaps because Mr. Obama continues to offer the Castro regime unilateral concessions requiring nothing in return.  Since the United States has placed no human rights conditions on the opening, the Castro regime continues to systematically engage in arbitrary detention of dissidents and others who speak up for democracy.  In fact, detentions have spiked in recent months.  The state continues to monopolize radio, television and newspapers.
Ordinary Cubans are, if anything, worse off because of that opening — and I can't think of a single gain for the United States, from it.

By way of John Hinderaker, who thinks that:  "The purpose of Obama’s deal with the Castros was to prop them up and keep them in power."

I wouldn't go that far; instead, I think that Obama wanted the opening to Cuba because he thinks it is the right thing to do, almost regardless of the consequences to ordinary Cubans.   (Obama probably does hope that the Cuban regime will soften over time, as he says he does.)
- 1:28 PM, 2 February 2016   [link]


Loser!  

Donald Trump

Okay, I won't do that again — but I couldn't resist after all Trump's trash talking, and last night's second place finish in Iowa.
- 12:29 PM, 2 February 2016   [link]


Archives

June 2002
July 2002
August 2002
September 2002
October 2002, Part 1 and Part 2
November 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
December 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3

January 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
February 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
March 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
April 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2004, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2004, Part 1, Part 2. Part 3, and Part 4
October 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2005, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2006, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2007, Part 1 and Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2007, Part 1 Part 2, and Part 3, and Part 4
June 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2008, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4
May 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3. and Part 4

January 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2012, Part 1, Part 2 Part 3, and Part 4
August 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3and Part 4
December 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2013, , Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4
March 2014, Part 1. Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2015, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2015, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2016, Part 1,






Coming Soon
  • Plan 17 Conservatives
  • FDR and Waterboarding
  • How Long Do Wars Last?
  • Carbon, Carbon Dioxide, and Crescent Wrenches
  • De-Lawyering and Attorney General McKenna


Coming Eventually
  • JFK and Wiretaps
  • Green Republicans
  • The Rise and Fall and Rise of Black Voting
  • Abortion, Cleft Palates, and Europe
  • Kweisi Mfume's Children
  • Public Opinion During Other US Wars
  • Dual Loyalties
  • The Power Index
  • Baby Dancing
  • Jocks, but no Nerds
  • The Four Caliphs




Best Posts


Books


Strange Obama


The Unknown Bush


University Reform


Uncorrected Mistakes


Vote Fraud


The Gang of Four


Articles


Assignment Desk
(What's This?)


Columns


Common Mistakes
(What's This?)


Chomsky Cult Program


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