Last updated:
3:44 PM, 20 February 2017



Jim Miller on Politics

  Email:
jimxc1 at gmail.com



What's he reading? Francis Parkman.

News Compilers
(Why These?)

A&L Daily
Drudge
Hot Air
Jewish World Review
Lexis-Nexis
Lucianne
Mediaite
memeorandum
Monsters and Critics
*newser
Orbusmax
Rantburg
Real Clear Politics
SciTech Daily
Yahoo


Big Media
(Why These?)

Atlantic Monthly
BBC
CNN
Chosen Ilbo
*Daily Mail (UK)
*Deutsche Welle
Fox News
Globe and Mail (CA)
Guardian (UK)
Investor's Business Daily
Le Figaro (FR)
Le Monde (FR)
The Local (Sweden)
National Review
New York Times
The New Yorker
Politico
Seattle PI
Seattle Times
Slate
Slashdot
The Spectator (UK)
Der Spiegel
Telegraph (UK)
Times (UK)
El Universal
U. S. News
USA Today
Wall Street Journal
Washington Examiner
Washington Post
Washington Times


References:

Adherents
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Census Quick Facts
Dave Leip's Election Atlas
FactCheck
Federal Statistics
How Stuff Works
NationMaster
Refdesk
Snopes
StateMaster
Tax Facts
Unionstats
Wikipedia


Smart Media
(Why These?)

ABC News Note
*The American
The American Spectator
Michael Barone
City Journal
Commentary
Front Page Magazine
Michael Fumento
The Hill
Media Research
Michael Medved
New York Sun
Number Watch
PJ Media
Public Interest
Roll Call
Spinsanity
Townhall
The Weekly Standard


Blogs
(Why These?)

My Group Blog:
Sound Politics

Northwest:


The American Empire
AndrewsDad
Chief Brief
Clear Fog Blog
Coffeemonkey's weblog
Croker Sack
"DANEgerus"
Economic Freedom
Federal Way Conservative
Freedom Foundation
Hairy Thoughts
Huckleberry Online
Andy MacDonald
NW Republican
Orcinus
Public Interest Transportation Forum
<pudge/*>
Northwest Progressive Institute
*Progressive Majority
Matt Rosenberg
Seattle Blogger
Seattle Bubble
Washington Policy Center
West Sound Politics
Zero Base Thinking


Other US:


Ace of Spades HQ
Alien Corn
Ann Althouse
American Thinker
The Anchoress
Armies of Liberation
Art Contrarian
"Baldilocks"
Balloon Juice
Baseball Crank
La Shawn Barber
Beldar
Bleat
Bookworm Room
Broadband Politics
Stuart Buck
Keith Burgess-Jackson
*Bush Center
Chef Mojo
Chicago Boyz
Classical Values
*College Insurrection
Confederate Yankee
Jules Crittenden
Daily Pundit
Discriminations
Gregory Djerejian
Daniel W. Drezner
Econlog
Econopundit
Election Law
John Ellis
Engage
Dean Esmay
Gary Farber
Fausta
FiveThirtyEight
Flares into Darkness
Flopping Aces
The Long War Journal
Gateway Pundit
Grasping Reality With Both Hands
Keith Hennessey
Hugh Hewitt
Siflay Hraka
Instapundit
Iowahawk
Joanne Jacobs
Jeff Jarvis
The Jawa Report
Brothers Judd
JustOneMinute
Kausfiles
Kesher Talk
Le-gal In-sur-rec-tion
Little Green Footballs
Megan McArdle
Michelle Malkin
Greg Mankiw
Marginal Revolution
Mazurland
Minding the Campus
The ModerateVoice
*The Monkey Cage Mudville Gazette
"neo-neocon"
Betsy Newmark
Newsbusters
No Watermelons Allowed
Ambra Nykola
*The Optimistic Conservative
The Ornery American
OxBlog
Parapundit
"Patterico"
Daniel Pipes
Polipundit
Political Arithmetik
Political Calculations
Pollster.com
Power and Control
Power Line
Protein Wisdom
QandO
Radio Equalizer
RedState
Riehl World View
Right Wing News
Rightwing Nuthouse
Dr. Sanity
Scrappleface
Screw Loose Change
Linda Seebach
Sense of Events
Joshua Sharf
Rand Simberg
Smart Politics
The Spirit of Enterprise
Stability For Our Time
*Strange Maps
The Strata-Sphere
Andrew Sullivan
Don Surber
Sweetness & Light
Taking Hayek Seriously
TalkLeft
Talking Points Memo
TaxProf
USS Neverdock
VDH's Private Papers
Verum Serum
Villainous Company
Volokh Conspiracy
Washington Monthly
Wizbang
Dr. Weevil
Matt Welch
Winds of Change
Meryl Yourish
zombietime


Canadians:


BlazingCatFur
Colby Cosh
Five Feet of Fury
Kate McMillan
Damian Penny
Bruce Rolston


Latin America:


Babalú
Caracas Chronicles
The Devil's Excrement
Venezuela News and Views


Overseas:


"Franco Aleman"
Bruce Bawer
Biased BBC
Tim Blair
*Andrew Bolt
Peter Briffa
Brussels Journal
Butterflies and Wheels
Crooked Timber
Davids Medienkritik
Egyptian Sand Monkey
EU Referendum
Greenie Watch
Guido Fawkes
Harry's Place
Mick Hartley
Oliver Kamm
JG, Caesarea
*Le Monde Watch
¡No-Pasarán!
Fredrik Norman
Melanie Phillips
*Political Betting
John Ray
samizdata
Shark Blog
Natalie Solent
Somtow's World
Bjørn Stærk
Laban Tall
*David Thompson
Michael Yon

Science Blogs:
The Blackboard
Cliff Mass Weather
Climate Audit
Climate Depot
Climate Science
*Judith Curry
Future Pundit
Gene Expression
The Loom
In The Pipeline
Roger Pielke Jr.
Real Climate
A Voyage To Arcturus
Watts Up With That?

Media Blogs:
Andrew Malcolm
Dori Monson
David Postman
Rhetorical Ammo
Tierney Lab
*White House Dossier

R-Rated:
Horse's A**
Huffington Post

*new



Pseudo-Random Thoughts

One China/Trump Story — Three Interpretations:  (At least.)

The story.
The Chinese government has granted President Trump and his business something they had been seeking for more than a decade: trademark protection for the use of the Trump name in the construction industry.
Without much effort, I can think of three interpretations for this story.  First, it is possible, perhaps not likely, but possible, that the slow Chinese bureaucracy finally got around to doing what Chinese laws and regulations require.

Second, it is possible that the Chinese government, impressed by Trump's strength, decided not to mess with him any more.

Third, it is possible that the Chinese government, knowing that he believes in offering bribes, decided that he might like to receive one, too.

No doubt, there are other possible interpretations that I haven't thought of, yet.
- 3:44 PM, 20 February 2017   [link]


Worth Watching Or Reading:  This 60 Minutes story on North Korea.
In Thursday’s press conference, President Trump would not say how the United States will respond to the actions of North Korea’s dictator over the last week.   Kim Jong-un tested a new type of missile.  Then, his estranged brother was poisoned in a Malaysian airport.  South Korea’s spy agency believes Kim ordered the hit.  Kim has nuclear weapons and has promised to test an intercontinental ballistic missile.  Such a weapon could eventually carry a nuclear warhead and threaten American cities.  That possibility, and the missiles he has aimed at South Korea are so dangerous, U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis went to Seoul on his first foreign trip.

We went just days later and saw how tense the situation has become.  We got two important perspectives.  We spoke to the commander of the 28,000 American troops there -- as well as the highest-ranking North Korean to defect in decades.   He told us the missiles and murders are part of Kim’s raging obsession with the survival of his regime.
(The story is about 20 minutes long.)

I have been wondering whether President Park's little problems might tempt the North Korean regime to do something rash.  So far they haven't — as far as I know.

(If you are wondering why the North Korean regime used female agents to kill Kim Jong-nam, you can find an explanation here.  The men running the regime are evil, but they aren't stupid.)
- 2:32 PM, 20 February 2017   [link]


Biathlon Breakthrough:  First, Lowell Bailey.
Biathlete Lowell Bailey won the men’s 20-kilometer race at the IBU World Championships in Hochfilzen, Austria, on Thursday, the first for the United States in the sport.

Biathlon was the only Winter Olympics sport in which the USA had not won an Olympic or world title, a drought that dated back to 1958 for world titles and 1960 for the Olympics.
And then Susan Dunklee.
Susan Dunklee capped the U.S.’ best-ever biathlon world championships by becoming the first American woman to take an individual medal, a silver, at an Olympics or worlds on Sunday.
Congratulations to Bailey and Dunklee.

(For those who haven't been cross-country skiers, or target shooters, let me note that the biathlon is a weird sport, because it combines two opposites.  First, you have to ski hard, exercising all the big muscles in your body — and then you have to stop and calm all those muscles down, so you can make your shots.  And then repeat the sequence one or more times.)
- 1:44 PM, 20 February 2017   [link]


Ambrose Bierce's Definition for the day.
PRESIDENT, n. The leading figure in a small group of men of whom— and of whom only—it is positively known that immense numbers of their countrymen did not want any of them for President.
Probably not true for George Washington, but true for every president since him.

(As I have mentioned before, the federal holiday today is actually Washington's Birthday.   The states vary on what they call today, and even whether it is a state holiday.)
- 9:34 AM, 20 February 2017   [link]


Idiots, Lunatics, News Readers, And Presidential Candidates:  Rebecca West did not have a high opinion of women — or men.

In Black Lamb and Grey Falcon, she described what she saw as characteristic defects of each sex.

West was in a hospital recovering from an operation, when she heard bad news on the radio:
[S]o I rang for the nurse and when she came, I cried to her, 'Switch on the telephone!  I must speak to my husband at once.  A most terrible thing has happened.  The King of Yugoslavia has been assassinated.'  'Oh dear!' she replied.  'Did you know him?'  'No,' I said.  ''Then why', she asked, 'do you think it's so terrible?'

Her question made me remember that the word 'idiot' comes from a Greek root meaning private person.  Idiocy is the female defect: intent on their private lives, women follow their fate through a darkness deep as that cast by malformed cells in the brain.  It is no worse than the male defect, which is lunacy: they are so obsessed by public affairs that they see the world as by moonlight, which shows the outlines of every object, but not the details indicative of their nature.
If you are a woman, you tend to be an idiot (in the old Greek sense of the word); if you are a man, you tend to be a lunatic.  (Unlike West, I think the latter is a more serious defect.)

Judging by the news readers in this area, West was right about both.  The women show less interest in the news than the men; the women would often rather talk about their cats, the other news readers, and so forth, than about actual news stories.  It's a little harder to see the lunacy in what the men say, since they are usually just reading what has been written for them, but you can see it from time to time, in the serious way they treat the most absurd stories.

After I had noticed those characteristic defects, locally, I began thinking about the two presidential candidates, and decided that West was right about them, too.   Hillary Clinton was sure we would care deeply about what Trump had said to a beauty queen years ago, and Donald Trump apparently believes all kinds of weird ideas.

So West would say we were choosing between an idiot and a lunatic.

(As I have mentioned before, West led a most interesting life.)
- 3:05 PM, 19 February 2017   [link]


Neither Politico Nor RealClearPolitics Had Any Great Cartoons This Week:  But I liked the Russian bear in the 7th Politico cartoon, even though I disagree with the cartoonist's point, and the last RCP cartoon makes a free speech point that needs to be made more often.
- 1:31 PM, 19 February 2017   [link]


Trust can be misplaced.

(When I saw that cartoon, I immediately thought of this variation — and I suspect some of you did, too.)
- 7:42 AM, 19 February 2017   [link]


Why Did Donald Trump Make That Electoral College Claim — Again?  Once again, Trump claimed that his electoral college win was special.
“You said today that you had the biggest electoral margin since Ronald Reagan,” [NBC’s Peter] Alexander said, sitting feet from the president.  He then began to list recent electoral victories bigger than Trump’s, which include both of Barack Obama’s victories, both of Bill Clinton’s victories and George H.W. Bush’s 1988 victory, all since Reagan.
Trump has said this before, and was saying it to an audience where almost everyone present would know that he was wrong — and would have good reasons to call him on it.

That leads me to conclude that Trump believed what he was saying,  (For similar reasons, I thought he believed what he said about the murder rate to the sheriffs.)

Such incidents lead to me to several tentative — and very unpleasant — conclusions:
  • None of his relatives, friends, or aides tell him when he has made a factual error.
  • To a much larger extent than normal, Trump believes what he wants to believe.
  • Trump is not very good with numbers.
The last surprised me — after all, Trump has been a businessman all his adult life.  But then I remembered the six bankruptcies, and the many failed products and businesses.  And I recalled that he rarely used numbers during the presidential campaign, preferring instead vague adjectives like "huge".

He can be a great talker, but there is little reason to think that he is good at statistics.

(For broadly similar reasons, I don't think Hillary Clinton is good at statistics, either.)
- 1:47 PM, 17 February 2017   [link]


Meow & Chandon And Dog Perignon:  Drinks sold to people who want their pets to drink with them.
Why drink alone when you can drink with your pet?

The question comes from two competing start-ups in the unlikely product category of faux wine for cats (and, to a lesser extent, dogs) that comes in miniature bottles with cutesy names.  No alcohol is involved (think liquid catnip).  But already the company that brought its products to market first, Apollo Peak — which calls itself “the original cat winery” — is accusing its newer competitor, Pet Winery, of being a copycat.
So far, judging by the small test the reporter did, the "wines" are a bigger success with owners than cats.

But the drink names are cute, which is something.
- 9:47 AM, 17 February 2017   [link]


Scientists Have Discovered Another Trick of an ancient enemy.
Why are mosquitoes drawn to people infected with malaria?  Swedish researchers say they've identified a substance pumped out by malaria parasites that triggers a distinctive smell in their victims, noticeable only to mosquitoes.
We may be able to synthesize the odor and use it against mosquitoes.

(Here's the usual Wikipedia article.)
- 3:54 PM, 16 February 2017   [link]


Has ObamaCare Been A Success?  Not by the most basic measurement:
In 2015, life expectancy at birth was 78.8 years for the total U.S. population—a decrease of 0.1 year from 78.9 years in 2014 (Figure 1). For males, life expectancy changed from 76.5 years in 2014 to 76.3 years in 2015—a decrease of 0.2 years, and for females, life expectancy decreased 0.1 year from 81.3 years in 2014 to 81.2 years in 2015.
(Infant mortality, another general measure of health, increased "from 582.1 infant deaths per 100,000 live births in 2014 to 589.5 in 2015, but this change was not statistically significant".)

The last time life expectancy declined in the United States was in 1993.

We were told that ObamaCare would improve our health, which implied that it would increase life expectancy.  Instead life expectancy declined in 2015, the latest year for which we have complete numbers, and had been rising very slowly in the four years before 2015.

Faced with this decline, we can draw three broad types of conclusions:
  1. ObamaCare caused the decline.
  2. ObamaCare had no effect on life expectancy.
  3. ObamaCare kept the decline from being even worse.
Now, here's what troubles me:  I could construct plausible sounding arguments for each of the three and, with some searching of news sites, find examples to illustrate each of the three.

I'm not going to do that because I don't think it would be honest, but I did want to warn you that others may be less scrupulous, or have spent less time looking at health statistics, so you are likely to see those types of arguments, especially the first and the third, as the nation debates ObamaCare, again.

(If forced to choose one of the three, I would say that the second seems most likely to me.)
- 3:29 PM, 16 February 2017   [link]


7, 10, 11, 14, 18, . . . .  Those were some of the speeds I saw in Seattle-area traffic reports during yesterday's commutes.  Yesterday was worse than normal because of the heavy rain here, but not that much worse.

For example, the stylist who cuts my hair about once a month tells me that her commute takes about 45 minutes in the mornings, and about an hour in the evenings.  (The distance is about 20 miles, and most of it is not over one of the one of the most heavily traveled roads.)

If you are wondering why the people in this area put up with the congestion, it's because a majority of them believe that — if we spend enough money on mass transit, especially trains — other people will get off the roads.

That this strategy has failed for decades, that traffic problems get worse every year, has not shaken their faith, or caused them to reject the leaders who have been pushing it.

One of the reasons for the constancy is that so many who disagree with the strategy have left the area, and been replaced by newcomers who have come from areas where traffic is even worse.
- 9:06 AM, 16 February 2017   [link]


Good Secretaries Anticipate their boss's needs.
- 7:02 AM, 16 February 2017   [link]


My Prediction Was Correct — But Too Timid:  On 13 January I said:
Presidents generally begin the transition with a "honeymoon" period, with higher popularity than they had at the end of the campaign.   That was true, to some extent, even for Trump, but it looks as if this man — who craves public applause — will be getting less and less of it, from the general public.

Which leads me to this prediction:   Within the first six months of his presidency, Trump will start doing campaign events, again.   (As you probably know, he did several of them after the election.)
He's planning one for this weekend.
President Donald Trump is returning to the trail.

The president will hold a rally Saturday afternoon at a hangar in Melbourne, Florida.  It will be his first campaign-style rally since his so-called thank-you tour during the transition period to states he won in November.
So I should have said six weeks, not months
- 7:59 PM, 15 February 2017   [link]


Kim Jong-nam's Assassination:  This BBC story has the essential facts, including — the British are good at such things — a genealogy chart for the Communist monarchy.
Kim Jong-nam was attacked on Monday morning while waiting at the budget terminal of Kuala Lumpur International Airport for a 10:00 flight to Macau, Malaysian newspaper reports say, quoting police.

Exactly how the attack unfolded is still unclear.  Officials and witnesses have variously said he was splashed with a chemical or had a cloth placed over his face.  Earlier reports spoke of a "spray" being used or a needle.

He died on the way to hospital.
That "LOL" T-shirt is a weird touch, but, thinking about it, I can see why it might make the target less suspicious.
- 7:04 PM, 15 February 2017   [link]


Interesting:  This David Ignatius column on Mike Flynn.

Ignatius says that Flynn was a brilliant warrior in Iraq and afterward — but had the wrong talents to head the Defense Intelligence Agency.
The DIA, a messy agency of nearly 20,000, mostly civilians, was famously the underachiever in the intelligence community.  Flynn tried to fix everything at once.  He had an ambitious but unrealistic plan for fusing the agency into mission centers.  His superiors said no; Flynn went ahead anyway.   Employees complained of shouting matches, bad leadership and a demoralized agency.
What Ignatius says seems plausible enough, though he doesn't quite explain why Flynn became infatuated with Russia.
- 4:02 PM, 15 February 2017   [link]


Neither Republican Is A Heavy Favorite In The Next Presidential Election:  The French Republican (or, if you prefer, Républicain), François Fillon, is now given just an 18 percent chance of winning this year's French presidential election, down from 69 percent last November.

What happened to Fillon?  He has been accused of hiring his wife for government jobs — which is legal as long as she actually did the work — which she may not have.

The current leader among the bettors, Emmanuel Macron, has two things going for him:  He is not François Fillon — and he is not Marine Le Pen.

The American Republican, Donald Trump, is, as I write, given just a 35 percent chance of winning in 2020, though I must note that the betting market is currently thinly traded.  (You may find it interesting to see who else is attracting bettors.)

(Here's the Wikipedia article on Le Canard enchaîné, with the usual caveats.)
- 12:50 PM, 15 February 2017   [link]


Too Weird Not To Share:  Alex Jones on demons from your TV.

I've thought for a long time that we Americans watch too much TV, but this is one hazard I hadn't even considered.
- 9:14 AM, 15 February 2017   [link]


First Car, First Love:  That can be true for cities, as well as individuals.
Detroit has its Mustang.  Munich has its Bimmer.  Bielsko-Biala will always have the Maluch.

The Maluch, or little one, is officially the Fiat 126p hatchback.  Drab and cramped, it lacks either girth or pretension.  But it has a perversely special place in Polish hearts.

“The Maluch was the beginning of an automotive revolution in Poland,” said Jacek Krywult, the mayor of Bielsko-Biala, Poland.
It doesn't seem perverse at all, to me.

(Here's Bielsko-Biala, and here are pictures of the Maluch.)
- 8:41 AM, 15 February 2017   [link]


Kirkland Buoy:  I don't think I've posted any pictures from my Panasonic FZ200, which is a shame, because it's a very nice ultra-zoom.   Here's a very simple picture of a buoy protecting a swimming and wading area in Kirkland.

kirkland buoy, 2016

You are free to use the buoy for a political metaphor or two if you like, but I won't do so, at least not tonight.

(I believe the camera is out of production, although Amazon still has a few for sale.  The replacement model is similar, but can take 4K video, as well.)
- 7:39 PM, 14 February 2017   [link]


Valentine Poll Results:  Ariel Edwards-Levy and Grace Sparks collected a bunch.

You are almost sure to find one or two you like — and one or two that you don't.  Here's my favorite:
2002, Fox News:  “Which couple do you think will have a happier Valentine’s Day―George and Laura Bush or Bill and Hillary Clinton?”   (73% George and Laura Bush, 12% Bill and Hillary Clinton, 10% not sure.  5% volunteered that both couples would be equally happy.)
It's my favorite because it shows that many Democrats were able to recognize reality, and overcome their partisanship.

(For the record:  I'd choose George and Laura over Barack and Michelle, too, but consider that a much closer call.)
- 4:12 PM, 14 February 2017   [link]


Out Like Flynn:  Yesterday, I said that I didn't have a strong opinion on whether Mike Flynn should be in serious trouble; today, now that he has resigned, I am uncertain whether he should have resigned.

Eli Lake, who knows more about intelligence operations than the average journalist, is also uncertain.
It's not even clear that Flynn lied.  He says in his resignation letter that he did not deliberately leave out elements of his conversations with Ambassador Sergey Kislyak when he recounted them to Vice President Mike Pence.  The New York Times and Washington Post reported that the transcript of the phone call reviewed over the weekend by the White House could be read different ways.  One White House official with knowledge of the conversations told me that the Russian ambassador raised the sanctions to Flynn and that Flynn responded that the Trump team would be taking office in a few weeks and would review Russia policy and sanctions.  That's neither illegal nor improper.

What's more, the Washington Post reported Monday night that last month Sally Yates, then the acting attorney general, had informed the White House that Flynn discussed sanctions with Kislyak and that he could be susceptible to blackmail because he misled Pence about it.  If it was the lie to Pence that sunk Flynn, why was he not fired at the end of January?
You'll probably want to read the rest of the column for Lake's speculations on what really happened.

I'll just add this thought:  Some news accounts have said there were phone calls between Flynn and Russian officials.  If so, he may have said things in the other calls he shouldn't have.

That phone call, or those phone calls, would be less important, were it not for incidents like this one:
Flynn himself traveled in 2015 to Russia to attend a conference put on by the country's propaganda network, RT.  He has acknowledged he was paid through his speaker's bureau for his appearance.  That doesn't look good, but it's also not illegal in and of itself.  All of this is to say there are many unanswered questions about Trump's and his administration's ties to Russia.
I don't think I am the only person who would prefer that there were fewer such "unanswered questions".

(Here's the Wikipedia article on RT, with way more than the usual caveats.  In the last year or so, I have noticed many more links to their articles, links put up by Trump supporters and, perhaps, Putin's operatives.)
- 1:43 PM, 14 February 2017   [link]


Happy Valentine's Day!  With the usual exceptions.
- 12:28 PM, 14 February 2017   [link]


This Quote is too good not to share.
The Trouble with quotes on the internet is that it's difficult to determine whether or not they are genuine - Abraham Lincoln
(Yes, it is, but I do what I can — most of the time.)
- 10:21 AM, 14 February 2017   [link]


The Olympic Mountains Are Looking Lovely Today:  As you can see in these views from Poulsbo.

If the weather forecasters are right, they should be lovely for at least part of tomorrow, too.

(Fun fact:  Much of the Olympics are uplifted oceanic crust.  On hikes along some of the ridges you can see blobby "pillow lava", the kind that forms when lava oozes out into the ocean.

Here's Poulsbo.)
- 3:46 PM, 13 February 2017   [link]


Most American Presidents Speak Often Of Freedom, Democracy, And Other Such Good Things:  For example, here's another selection from Lincoln's first inaugural.
Plainly the central idea of secession is the essence of anarchy.  A majority held in restraint by constitutional checks and limitations, and always changing easily with deliberate changes of popular opinions and sentiments, is the only true sovereign of a free people.  Whoever rejects it does of necessity fly to anarchy or to despotism.  Unanimity is impossible.  The rule of a minority, as a permanent arrangement, is wholly inadmissible; so that, rejecting the majority principle, anarchy or despotism in some form is all that is left.
I said "most", but, if this study is correct, we can be more precise.
Consider, for instance, these commonly used inaugural words: “freedom,” “liberty,” “rights” and “public.”  In the nation’s first 57 inaugural addresses, each of these four words occurs, on average, once in every 72 words.  This is to be expected, as our founding documents make clear that liberty, justice, public welfare, and human rights are the notions that constitute the U.S. political system.

Trump’s inaugural usage of these words was quite different, using freedom-related words (e.g. “freedom,” “freedoms,” “liberty”) only once.  The president also used “public” only once, and did not make any reference to democratic rights.

His inaugural address was consistent with his previous political speech.
So, if the study is correct — and I believe it is, because counting words is simple — we can say that, unlike all previous presidents, Trump does not speak often of freedom, democracy, and other such good things.

That doesn't, by itself, prove that they aren't important to him, but it does make you wonder how important they are to Trump.
- 1:04 PM, 13 February 2017   [link]


Out Like Flynn?  Perhaps we will soon see that headline, considering the trouble Mike Flynn, Trump's National Security Adviser, is in.

(I don't have a strong opinion on whether he should be in that much trouble, but I couldn't resist the word play.)
- 10:09 AM, 13 February 2017   [link]


Honest Salesman, Dishonest Product?  This cartoon is more interesting than funny.

But I wouldn't spend too much time trying to make sense of it, if I were you.
- 9:50 AM, 13 February 2017   [link]


Archives

June 2002
July 2002
August 2002
September 2002
October 2002, Part 1 and Part 2
November 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
December 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3

January 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
February 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
March 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
April 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2004, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2004, Part 1, Part 2. Part 3, and Part 4
October 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2005, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2006, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2007, Part 1 and Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2007, Part 1 Part 2, and Part 3, and Part 4
June 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2008, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4
May 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3. and Part 4

January 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2012, Part 1, Part 2 Part 3, and Part 4
August 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3and Part 4
December 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2013, , Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4
March 2014, Part 1. Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2015, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2015, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2017, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3






Coming Soon
  • Plan 17 Conservatives
  • FDR and Waterboarding
  • How Long Do Wars Last?
  • Carbon, Carbon Dioxide, and Crescent Wrenches
  • De-Lawyering and Attorney General McKenna


Coming Eventually
  • JFK and Wiretaps
  • Green Republicans
  • The Rise and Fall and Rise of Black Voting
  • Abortion, Cleft Palates, and Europe
  • Kweisi Mfume's Children
  • Public Opinion During Other US Wars
  • Dual Loyalties
  • The Power Index
  • Baby Dancing
  • Jocks, but no Nerds
  • The Four Caliphs




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