Jim Miller on Politics

Last updated:
11:32 AM, 13 August 2018



Jim Miller on Politics

  Email:
jimxc1 at gmail.com



What's he reading? Francis Parkman.

News Compilers
(Why These?)

A&L Daily
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memeorandum
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Big Media
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Atlantic Monthly
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Times (UK)
U. S. News
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Washington Times


References:

Adherents
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Dave Leip's Election Atlas
FactCheck
Federal Statistics
How Stuff Works
NationMaster
Refdesk
Snopes
StateMaster
Tax Facts
Unionstats
Wikipedia


Smart Media
(Why These?)

*The American
The American Spectator
Michael Barone
City Journal
Commentary
FiveThirtyEight
Front Page Magazine
Michael Fumento
The Hill
Media Research
Michael Medved
New York Sun
Number Watch
PJ Media
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Roll Call
Spinsanity
Townhall
The Weekly Standard


Blogs
(Why These?)

My Group Blog:
Sound Politics

Northwest:


Economic Freedom
Orcinus
Public Interest Transportation Forum
<pudge/*>
Northwest Progressive Institute
Seattle Bubble


Other US:


Ace of Spades HQ
Ann Althouse
American Thinker
Art Contrarian
Balloon Juice
Baseball Crank
Beldar
Bookworm Room
Chicago Boyz
Classical Values
*College Insurrection
Daily Pundit
Discriminations
Econlog
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Fausta
Flares into Darkness
Flopping Aces
The Long War Journal
Keith Hennessey
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Iowahawk
Joanne Jacobs
Jeff Jarvis
The Jawa Report
Brothers Judd
JustOneMinute
Kausfiles
Kesher Talk
Le-gal In-sur-rec-tion
Little Green Footballs
Megan McArdle
Michelle Malkin
Greg Mankiw
Marginal Revolution
Mazurland
Minding the Campus
The ModerateVoice
*The Monkey Cage Mudville Gazette
"neo-neocon"
Betsy Newmark
Newsbusters
No Watermelons Allowed
Parapundit
"Patterico"
Daniel Pipes
Polipundit
Political Arithmetik
Political Calculations
Power Line
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Right Wing News
Scrappleface
Screw Loose Change
Sense of Events
Joshua Sharf
Rand Simberg
Smart Politics
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*Strange Maps
The Strata-Sphere
Sweetness & Light
TalkLeft
Talking Points Memo
TaxProf
VDH's Private Papers
Volokh Conspiracy
Washington Monthly
Wizbang
Matt Welch
Winds of Change
Meryl Yourish
*Zip Dialog
zombietime


Canadians:


BlazingCatFur
Colby Cosh
Five Feet of Fury
Kate McMillan
Damian Penny
Bruce Rolston


Latin America:


Babalú
Caracas Chronicles
The Devil's Excrement
Venezuela News and Views


Overseas:


Bruce Bawer
Biased BBC
Tim Blair
*Andrew Bolt
Brussels Journal
*The Conservative Woman
Crooked Timber
Davids Medienkritik
Egyptian Sand Monkey
EU Referendum
Guido Fawkes
Harry's Place
Mick Hartley
Oliver Kamm
JG, Caesarea
¡No-Pasarán!
Melanie Phillips
Political Betting
John Ray
samizdata
Shark Blog
Natalie Solent
Laban Tall
*David Thompson
Michael Yon

Science Blogs:
The Blackboard
Cliff Mass Weather
Climate Audit
Climate Depot
Climate Science
*Judith Curry
Future Pundit
Gene Expression
The Loom
In The Pipeline
Roger Pielke Jr.
Real Climate
A Voyage To Arcturus
Watts Up With That?

Media Blogs:
My Northwest

R-Rated:
Horse's A**
Huffington Post

Emeritus:
Alien Corn
Dr. Sanity
Villainous Company
*new



Pseudo-Random Thoughts

The "Lowlife" Had Been Fired By The "Conman"  But he gave her a new job anyway, a job for which she had no obvious qualifications.

She didn't work out, and was fired again.

Now the lowlife is seeking revenge by saying nasty things about the conman.  (Some of them may be true.)

Neither is famous for telling the truth, but it would still be fun if reporters asked Omarosa Manigault Newman why she wanted to work for a conman, and Donald Trump why he hired a lowlife.

(Aren't you glad we are spending our time discussing important issues?)
- 11:32 AM, 13 August 2018   [link]


This Andy Marlette Cartoon Doesn't Make A Deep Point, but it made me smile.
- 10:52 AM, 13 August 2018   [link]


Anne Applebaum Wonders Why "Institutions" weren't able to stop Paul Manafort — and Donald Trump — years ago.

I've wondered about the same thing, ever since Manafort joined the Trump campaign, although I phrased my question differently:  Why, I wondered, didn't prosecutors go after Manafort, when it was so obvious he was guilty of something or other, probably many somethings or others?

And during the campaign, I learned enough about Trump's dubious deals to wonder why so few prosecutors had gone after him.

And I have come up with tentative answers to that question, for each man.

With Manafort, I think prosecutors made a cost/benefit analysis, though not in any formal way.  He was not, at that time, a big name, so convicting him would not have made a prosecutor's reputation.  And so much of the evidence would have been in other nations, many of them not all that cooperative with US law enforcement.

So a trial, they would have thought, would be expensive and difficult — and there would be no certainty of a conviction, because much of the evidence would not be available.

Trump escaped some prosecutions by buying off those who had claims against him.   (And, possibly, by the judicious use of campaign contributions.)

Most prosecutors would rather have a settlement than nothing, but settlements rarely enhance a prosecutor's reputation the way a big conviction does.

So a trial, prosecutors would have thought, would be expensive and time consuming, and would probably end, at best, in a settlement.

It would be enlightening if some journalist, Applebaum for instance, were to ask prosecutors who could have done more why they didn't.

(Is Rudy Giuliani one of those prosecutors?  That's a great question, to which I do not have an answer.)
- 8:45 PM, 11 August 2018   [link]


There Was A Small Ironic Point In Last Year's Charlottesville Demonstrations:  (Along with the hate, violence, and death.)

As I am sure you recall, among the demonstrators were open anti-Semites, and even neo-Nazis.

They were there, ostensibly, to protest the removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee.

Who was supported, all through the Civil War, by Judah Benjamin.
Judah Philip Benjamin, QC (August 11, 1811 – May 6, 1884) was a lawyer and politician who was a United States Senator from Louisiana, a Cabinet officer of the Confederate States and, after his escape to the United Kingdom at the end of the American Civil War, an English barrister.  Benjamin was the first Jew to be elected to the United States Senate who had not renounced that faith, and was the first Jew to hold a Cabinet position in North America.
Confederates leaders had their faults, but they were not — for their time — especially anti-Semitic.

I suspect those neo-Nazis have never heard of Benjamin.
- 5:39 PM, 12 August 2018   [link]


The Current "Pepper . . . And Salt" made me chuckle.
- 2:52 PM, 12 August 2018   [link]


For An Entertaining (And Scary) Example of Artificial Intelligence Gone Wrong, you might look at Fred Saberhagen's Berserker stories.

I like the collection of his first stories, Berserker, and the anthology, Berserker Base.  The stories in the latter are written by a wild variety of authors, and it is fun to see their different approaches — and the hokey way Saberhagen ties them all together.
- 3:26 PM, 11 August 2018   [link]


Another Unforeseen Problem in artificial intelligence research.

(This one should be easy to solve.)
- 2:12 PM, 11 August 2018   [link]


Can Nancy Pelosi Save The Republican House Majority?  She has a better chance than anyone else I can think of.

Apparently many House Democrats agree with me on that, a fair number of them openly.

Here in Washington state, Democratic Governor Jay Inslee has sarcastically urged Donald Trump to come out and campaign for Republicans.  If Republican leaders have any smarts, they'll issue an invitation in the same spirit to Pelosi.

(Those outside Washington state are likely to see more of Inslee, since he is running for president.  Unfortunately.

For years, I've thought Inslee was evidence that sometimes the Peter principle is too optimistic, that sometimes a person can continue to rise long after they have reached their level of incompetence.

Inslee is not a bad man, and he is a competent campaigner, but he does not have the abilities a legislator or political executive needs.

Jay Inslee)
- 2:54 PM, 10 August 2018   [link]


I Haven't Said Anything About 3-D Printed Guns — Because I Don't Think There Is Much To Say:  Way back in the 1950s, I learned that semi-literate gang members were making usable, but lousy, guns from converted cap guns.

Later, I learned from history books that, hundreds of years ago, illiterate village blacksmiths in West Africa were making usable guns with primitive tools.  (I believe that some of the blacksmiths were able to make fairly good guns, for their time, but could be wrong about that.)

So the fact that there is one more way to make not-very-good guns doesn't bother me much.

And shouldn't bother anyone else who understands that the secrets of making guns were out hundreds of years ago.

(Perhaps I shouldn't say this but — if I were to decide to make my own guns — I wouldn't invest in a 3-D printer; I'd look for a book or two on gunsmithing and invest in some simple shop tools.  And that is as much as I intend to say about the subject.)
- 12:57 PM, 10 August 2018   [link]


Too Funny Not To Share:  Does that fan of the Confederacy, Corey Stewart, have deep roots in Virginia?

No.
Stewart was born in Duluth, Minnesota.[69]  He transferred to Georgetown University after a year at St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota, and was the first member of his family to graduate from college.[70]  He also graduated from the William Mitchell College of Law in St. Paul, Minnesota, and afterward settled in Virginia.[70]  Stewart works as an international trade attorney, and he and his family live in Bel Air, a historic colonial-era plantation house in Woodbridge, Virginia that was regularly visited by Thomas Jefferson and George Washington.[70]   He met his wife, Maria, who is from Sweden, while spending a year teaching English in Japan before law school.[70]   The couple has two sons.[70]
Skeptics may wonder just how sincere he is in what he says at political events, considering that background.

(Caveat:  Stewart has been caught editing his own Wikipedia article.)
- 9:04 AM, 10 August 2018   [link]


This Week's Collection Of Cartoons from Politico.

My favorites:  Signe Wilkinson's Trump, Michael Ramirez's hysteria, and Steve Sack's Fox News.

(To be fair, I should add that there are fine journalists at Fox News; in fact, most of the Fox nonsense comes from opinion hosts, not news men and women.)
- 8:35 AM, 10 August 2018   [link]


Corey Stewart Is Not A Lincoln Republican:  In fact, Stewart appears to be on the other side.
Corey Stewart, the Republican nominee for a US Senate seat for Virginia, praised in a speech last year Virginia's decision in 1861 to secede from the Union, putting it on par with rebellions during the American Revolution and today.

The Virginia Republican made the comments in April 2017 at an event in South Boston, Virginia, hosted by an unapologetic secessionist.  A video of his remarks, given during his failed 2017 gubernatorial run, was posted on his Facebook account.
Judging by the polls, Stewart will lose to Democrat Tim Kaine by a huge margin — and will cause the Republican Party considerable collateral damage.

It is likely that the damage will take years to repair, even if Stewart goes away after his defeat.

(Corey Stewart)
- 3:16 PM, 9 August 2018   [link]


The DNC has a good idea.
Democrats running in November's midterms were warned Friday not to use devices produced by Chinese manufacturers ZTE and Huawei.  The warning, which came from the Democratic National Committee, was sent out after the DNC learned that a Democratic organization was considering buying ZTE phones for its staff, a senior Democratic source told CNN.
. . .
FBI Director Christopher Wray told the commitee the FBI is "deeply concerned that any company beholden to foreign governments that don't share our values are not companies that we want to be gaining positions of power inside our telecommunications network."

"It provides the capacity to maliciously modify or steal information," Wray said.   "And it provides the capacity to conduct undetected espionage."
But I think they should go further.

We don't want the Chinese Communists spying on us; we also don't want "Emperor" Xi to have our dollars, and so we should, whenever possible, avoid buying anything from the Communist empire.

Those who think I being too extreme should read, or re-read, John Garnaut's article.

(You may have heard that, for years now, travelers to China have been advised not to bring their usual phones and laptops, because it was nearly certain the Communists would try to install spy software on them.  Instead travelers were advised to bring a cheap phone — and discard it after the trip.)
- 11:03 AM, 9 August 2018   [link]


It Isn't A Cat Video:  But it is a cat cartoon.
- 9:32 AM, 9 August 2018   [link]


Today Is The 100th Anniversary Of The Batle Of Amiens:  The British have commemorated it, and we ought to at least remember this turning point in World War I.
The Battle of Amiens, also known as the Third Battle of Picardy (French: 3ème Bataille de Picardie), was the opening phase of the Allied offensive which began on 8 August 1918, later known as the Hundred Days Offensive, that ultimately led to the end of the First World War.  Allied forces advanced over 11 kilometres (7 mi) on the first day, one of the greatest advances of the war, with Henry Rawlinson's British Fourth Army playing the decisive role.  The battle is also notable for its effects on both sides' morale and the large number of surrendering German forces.  This led Erich Ludendorff to describe the first day of the battle as "the black day of the German Army".  Amiens was one of the first major battles involving armoured warfare and marked the end of trench warfare on the Western Front; fighting becoming mobile once again until the armistice was signed on 11 November 1918.
(Links omitted.)

The tanks were effective, but not reliable.
The infantry had outrun the supporting artillery,[27] and the initial force of more than 500 tanks that played a large role in the Allied success was reduced to six battle-ready tanks within four days.[28]
Many, perhaps most, of the missing tanks could be repaired, and were, soon.

But this reliability problem is one of the reasons the Allies advanced in a series of battles, rather than continuously during the next hundred days.

By then American reinforcements were arriving at at rate, if I recall correctly, of about 250,000 a month.  The were half trained, but they made a difference, anyway.

(The principal planner of the attack was John Monash, a remarkable man.)
- 9:50 PM, 8 August 2018   [link]


Worth Reading:  Sean Trende's analysis, "Tuesday Night Is a Bad Sign for GOP Chances in the House ".

Democrats will be pleased because he thinks a Democratic "wave" is possible in the House in November's election; Republicans will be unhappy for the same reason.

If there is a wave, I would expect it to be higher in the Midwest and West than in the South, judging by the results of special elections this year.
- 7:36 PM, 8 August 2018   [link]


US Sanctions Russia Over The Skripal Poisonings:  A State Department official made the announcement today.
The US is to place sanctions on Russia after determining that it used nerve agent against former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia in the UK in March.
. . .
The US determined "that the government of the Russian Federation has used chemical or biological weapons in violation of international law, or has used lethal chemical or biological weapons against its own nationals", US state department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said.

The sanctions are to take effect on or around 22 August, she added.
It would be interesting to know what non-public information the US has on the attack.

(This is a neat example of my three layers analysis of the Trump presidency.  The permanent presidency made the determination, but it was announced by a member of the Republican presidency.  Ordinarily, you would expect Mike Pompeo to make such an important announcement, but he chose not to.

And the Trump layer?  Most likely the Donald knew about the announcement but we can't be sure he approved of it.

I don't think it was accidental that the announcement came on a day when most American journalists are discussing election results.)
- 2:56 PM, 8 August 2018   [link]


The Republican Won (Probably); The Swing Was A Warning To Republicans:  That's my double — and not at all original — summary of the incomplete results in Ohio's 12th district.  Troy Balderson is leading Danny O'Connor 101,574 to 99,820.   In 2016, the Republican won 251,266 to 112,638.

(Sometimes conventional thinking is correct.)

And we should not forget that the Republican Party put far more resources far more resources into the contest than the Democratic Party did.
- 2:07 PM, 8 August 2018   [link]


Yes, That Headline is "pretty odd".

But accurate.
- 10:39 AM, 8 August 2018   [link]


A Few British Bettors have gotten interested in the Ohio 12th special election.
The two final polls suggest that this is a toss-up.  Emerson has the Democratic contender 1% ahead while Remington gives it to the Republican by 2 points.  Both these are within the margin of error.
. . .
My betting rule in toss-up elections is that the option with the longest odds is the value bet.  I got on the Democrat with Ladbrokes at 11/10 this morning.  That has now tightened to odds-on.
I have no opinion on whether Mike Smithson has made a good bet.

But I can add a little information.  The Democrat, Danny O'Connor, is promising not to vote for Nancy Pelosi.  And John Kasich thinks that the Republican, Troy Balderson, is the stronger candidate.

Since special elections can produce surprises, I'll just say I won't be shocked if either wins by, say, 5 points.

There is one easy prediction:  If the Republican wins, Trump will claim credit; if the Republican loses, Trump will blame other people.

(Ohio's 12th congressional district special election, 2018)
- 3:06 PM, 7 August 2018   [link]


In Washington's Senate Primary, Voters Can Choose A Candidate Who Favors A Vigorous Foreign Policy:  Democrat George H. Kalberer has a simple solution to a difficult problem:  "North Korea— Kick Jung's Ass with 30,000 Tomahawk Cruise Missiles."

Kalberer favors a similar solution for Xi Jinping, though he believes it would require more missiles and a blockade.

The Democratic Party is a bigger tent than I would have guessed.  No doubt Republicans are happy that he did not choose to run as a Republican.

(I don't believe we have 30,000 Tomahawk cruise missiles in stock, and assume it would take a year or two to produce that many, even with a crash program.

United States Senate election in Washington, 2018)
- 8:04 AM, 7 August 2018   [link]


The Current "Pepper . . . And Salt" made me smile.
- 7:26 AM, 7 August 2018   [link]


Archives

June 2002
July 2002
August 2002
September 2002
October 2002, Part 1 and Part 2
November 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
December 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3

January 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
February 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
March 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
April 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2004, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2004, Part 1, Part 2. Part 3, and Part 4
October 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2005, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2006, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2007, Part 1 Part 2, and Part 3, and Part 4
June 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2008, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4
May 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3. and Part 4

January 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2012, Part 1, Part 2 Part 3, and Part 4
August 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3and Part 4
December 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2013, , Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4
March 2014, Part 1. Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2015, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2015, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2017, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
April 2017, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2017, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2018, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2018, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2018, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2018, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2018, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2018, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2018, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2018, Part 1 and Part 2






Coming Soon
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  • FDR and Waterboarding
  • Carbon, Carbon Dioxide, and Crescent Wrenches


Coming Eventually
  • JFK and Wiretaps
  • Green Republicans
  • The Rise and Fall and Rise of Black Voting
  • Abortion, Cleft Palates, and Europe
  • Kweisi Mfume's Children
  • Public Opinion During Other US Wars
  • Dual Loyalties
  • The Power Index
  • Baby Dancing
  • Jocks, but no Nerds
  • The Four Caliphs




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Vote Fraud


The Gang of Four


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