Last updated:
8:39 AM, 16 April 2014



Jim Miller on Politics

  Email:
jimxc1 at gmail.com



What's he reading? Francis Parkman.

News Compilers
(Why These?)

A&L Daily
Drudge
egopnews.com
Hot Air
Jewish World Review
Lexis-Nexis
Lucianne
Mediaite
memeorandum
Monsters and Critics
Newsalert
Newsback
*newser
Orbusmax
Rantburg
Real Clear Politics
SciTech Daily
Yahoo


Big Media
(Why These?)

Atlantic Monthly
BBC
CNN
Chosen Ilbo
*Daily Mail (UK)
*Deutsche Welle
Fox News
Globe and Mail (CA)
Guardian (UK)
Investor's Business Daily
Le Figaro (FR)
Le Monde (FR)
The Local (Sweden)
National Review
New Republic
New York Times
The New Yorker
Politico
Seattle PI
Seattle Times
Slate
Slashdot
The Spectator (UK)
Der Spiegel
Telegraph (UK)
Times (UK)
El Universal
U. S. News
USA Today
Wall Street Journal
Washington Examiner
Washington Post
Washington Times


References:

Adherents
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Census Quick Facts
Dave Leip's Election Atlas
FactCheck
Federal Statistics
How Stuff Works
NationMaster
Refdesk
Snopes
StateMaster
Tax Facts
Unionstats
Wikipedia


Smart Media
(Why These?)

ABC News Note
*The American
The American Spectator
Michael Barone
City Journal
Commentary
Front Page Magazine
Michael Fumento
The Hill
Charles Krauthammer
Media Research
Michael Medved
New York Sun
Number Watch
PJ Media
Public Interest
Roll Call
Spinsanity
Townhall
The Weekly Standard


Blogs
(Why These?)

My Group Blog:
Sound Politics

Northwest:


The American Empire
AndrewsDad
Chief Brief
Clear Fog Blog
Coffeemonkey's weblog
Croker Sack
"DANEgerus"
Economic Freedom
Federal Way Conservative
Freedom Foundation
Hairy Thoughts
Huckleberry Online
Andy MacDonald
NW Republican
Orcinus
Public Interest Transportation Forum
<pudge/*>
Northwest Progressive Institute
*Progressive Majority
Matt Rosenberg
Seattle Blogger
Seattle Bubble
Washington Policy Center
West Sound Politics
Zero Base Thinking


Other US:


Ace of Spades HQ
Alien Corn
Ann Althouse
American Thinker
The Anchoress
Armies of Liberation
Art Contrarian
"Baldilocks"
Balloon Juice
Baseball Crank
La Shawn Barber
Beldar
Bleat
Big Government
Bookworm Room
Broadband Politics
Stuart Buck
Keith Burgess-Jackson
*Bush Center
Chef Mojo
Chicago Boyz
Classical Values
*College Insurrection
Confederate Yankee
Jules Crittenden
Daily Pundit
Discriminations
Gregory Djerejian
Daniel W. Drezner
Econlog
Econopundit
Election Law
John Ellis
Engage
Dean Esmay
Gary Farber
Fausta
FiveThirtyEight
Flares into Darkness
Flopping Aces
The Long War Journal
Gateway Pundit
Grasping Reality With Both Hands
Keith Hennessey
Hugh Hewitt
Siflay Hraka
Instapundit
Iowahawk
Joanne Jacobs
Jeff Jarvis
The Jawa Report
Brothers Judd
JustOneMinute
Kausfiles
Kesher Talk
Le-gal In-sur-rec-tion
Little Green Footballs
Megan McArdle
Michelle Malkin
Greg Mankiw
Marginal Revolution
Mazurland
Minding the Campus
The ModerateVoice
*The Monkey Cage Mudville Gazette
"neo-neocon"
Betsy Newmark
Newsbusters
No Watermelons Allowed
Ambra Nykola
*The Optimistic Conservative
The Ornery American
OxBlog
Parapundit
"Patterico"
Daniel Pipes
Polipundit
Political Arithmetik
Political Calculations
Pollster.com
Power and Control
Power Line
Protein Wisdom
QandO
Radio Equalizer
RedState
Riehl World View
Right Wing News
Rightwing Nuthouse
Dr. Sanity
Scrappleface
Screw Loose Change
Linda Seebach
Sense of Events
Joshua Sharf
Rand Simberg
Smart Politics
The Spirit of Enterprise
Stability For Our Time
*Strange Maps
The Strata-Sphere
Andrew Sullivan
Don Surber
Sweetness & Light
Taking Hayek Seriously
TalkLeft
Talking Points Memo
TaxProf
USS Neverdock
VDH's Private Papers
Verum Serum
Villainous Company
Volokh Conspiracy
Washington Monthly
Wizbang
Dr. Weevil
Matt Welch
Winds of Change
Meryl Yourish
zombietime


Canadians:


*BlazingCatFur
Colby Cosh
Five Feet of Fury
Kate McMillan
Damian Penny
Bruce Rolston


Latin America:


Babalú
Caracas Chronicles
The Devil's Excrement
Venezuela News and Views


Overseas:


"Franco Aleman"
Bruce Bawer
Biased BBC
Tim Blair
*Andrew Bolt
Peter Briffa
Brussels Journal
*Bunyipitude
Butterflies and Wheels
Crooked Timber
Davids Medienkritik
Egyptian Sand Monkey
EU Referendum
Greenie Watch
Guido Fawkes
Harry's Place
Mick Hartley
Oliver Kamm
JG, Caesarea
*Le Monde Watch
¡No-Pasarán!
Fredrik Norman
Melanie Phillips
John Ray
samizdata
Shark Blog
Natalie Solent
Somtow's World
Bjørn Stærk
Laban Tall
Michael Yon
This is Zimbabwe

Science Blogs:
The Blackboard
Cliff Mass Weather
Climate Audit
Climate Depot
Climate Science
*Judith Curry
Future Pundit
Gene Expression
The Loom
In The Pipeline
Roger Pielke Jr.
Real Climate
A Voyage To Arcturus
Watts Up With That?

Media Blogs:
Andrew Malcolm
Dori Monson
David Postman
Rhetorical Ammo
Tierney Lab
*White House Dossier

R-Rated:
Horse's A**
Huffington Post

*new



Pseudo-Random Thoughts


This French cartoon amuses me, even though I don't agree with it.

(Why not?  Mostly because it gives way too much credit to President Obama, who has shown no sign that he would even know how to be a puppeteer in foreign affairs.  And President Hollande is not quite that ineffective, or that willing to be manipulated.)
- 8:39 AM, 16 April 2014   [link]


"Absurdities At The IRS"  Apama Mathur thinks these parts of our tax law are absurd.
Under tax law, stolen property, bribes, kickbacks, and income from other illegal activities must be counted as income.  Embezzlers, thieves, and bootleggers may also take deductions for costs relating to criminal activity.
I think that they actually make sense, in a weird way — and the courts have generally agreed with me.

What doesn't make sense is that our tax laws have become so complex that it is difficult for anyone with moderately complex financial affairs to be certain he is following them, as Donald Rumsfeld complains, every year.

Unfortunately, serious tax reform is unlikely as long as Barack Obama is president — and may be difficult even after he leaves, because so few Democrats support it, unlike in 1986.

(I think there would be even more complaints, were it not for the tax programs that take people step by step through their returns.  But I often wonder just how many people who use those programs understand the directions they are following.

As Mathur notes, the tax system was used to convict Al Capone — who definitely deserved to go to prison.)
- 8:00 AM, 16 April 2014   [link]


When I Saw This Survey Finding from Brazil, I was dubious.
There's been a huge backlash on social media in Brazil, after a new survey suggested 65% of Brazilians think women who dress in a revealing way "deserve to be attacked".
Rightly dubious, it seems.
Update 11 April 2014:  The institute which published the research - the IPEA - last week revealed it had made a mistake in its findings.  The correct figure for the percentage of Brazilians surveyed who agreed that women who dress in a revealing way "deserve to be attacked" was actually 26% they said - not 65%.
That 26% is still disturbing, but not nearly as disturbing as the 65%.

By way of Andrew Gelman.

(It is hard to know exactly what to make of that 26 percent, without more details about the survey, especially the question wording.

Since men often get in trouble when discussing this issue, I'll use a different crime to make a general point.  It is imprudent to flash large rolls of cash in some places, at some times.  If you were attacked after doing that, some might say you "deserved" it, not to excuse the criminal, but to say that you had not been as prudent as you should have been.)
- 2:01 PM, 15 April 2014   [link]


Is this Ramirez cartoon unfair to Nixon, Obama, or both?

Both men did talk, loosely, about using the IRS against their enemies.  (And Nixon had been a target of Kennedy's IRS, as Barry Goldwater was of LBJ's IRS.)

But Nixon's IRS didn't always follow those hints from Nixon, nor did Nixon always know what his underlings were up to.   For example:
Later on it developed that [John] Dean had prepared another list, this one of McGovern supporters, which he had transmitted to the IRS with a request for special audits of their returns.  But IRS Commissioner Johnnie Walters took the matter up with Treasury Secretary George P. Shultz, who told him to "do nothing".  According to Shultz, Walters's notes showed that the President had no knowledge of the list.
. . .
Subsequently a congressional committee—headed by two Democrats, Representative Wilbur Mills of Arkansas and Russell Long of Louisiana—took a long, hard look at how the IRS had treated the White House "enemies."  The conclusion by the staff of the Joint Committee on Taxation was that a number of "'enemies' were either not audited or were audited too leniently."  Even more startling was the finding that a number of those on the lists had not even bothered to file income tax returns. (pp. 332-333)
So I am inclined to think that the cartoon is unfair to Nixon.

(For an example of loose talk by Obama, see this Glenn Reynolds op-ed.   As he says, there are some things a president should not joke about.

Some have argued that Nixon often blew off steam with tough talk around his subordinates, and that those who knew him well did not take that talk seriously, did not act on it, even though Nixon might have appeared to have given them direct orders.  If true, that doesn't excuse the talk, but it does help us understand Nixon and his closest aides better.

Younger readers may want to know more about George Shultz.)
- 1:31 PM, 15 April 2014   [link]


The Almost Magic Material, Graphene:  Take some graphite from an ordinary pencil lead, separate out the carbon atoms, and arrange them into one-atom thick sheet and you have graphene.

graphene

Which doesn't behave much like graphite.
Graphene is the strongest, thinnest material known to exist.  A form of carbon, it can conduct electricity and heat better than anything else.  And get ready for this: It is not only the hardest material in the world, but also one of the most pliable.

Only a single atom thick, it has been called the wonder material.

Graphene could change the electronics industry, ushering in flexible devices, supercharged quantum computers, electronic clothing and computers that can interface with the cells in your body.
That brief list sounds pretty good, for a start.

(Arrange the carbon atoms one way, and you get diamonds; arrange them another way and you get graphene, which may be far more useful.  (And when they are not in any regular pattern, you have graphite.)

If you are up for a challenge, try the very technical Wikipedia article on graphene.  I think I understood parts of it.)

- 7:22 AM, 15 April 2014   [link]


"Seven Answers to Seven Questions You’re Probably Asking Right Now About The Nevada Rancher Situation"  If you want to understand the controversy, this Blaze article seems like a good place to start, though I haven't checked any of the answers myself.

Sample:
5. So Who Owns the Land in Question?

The federal government owns the disputed land and has claimed ownership since before Nevada even joined the union, according to a 2013 U.S. District Court ruling.

“[T]he public lands in Nevada are the property of the United States because the United States has held title to those public lands since 1848, when Mexico ceded the land to the United States,” the ruling states, confirming the federal government’s longstanding claim that it lawfully acquired ownership of the land under the Treaty of the Guadalupe Hidalgo.
For now, I don't have anything more to say specifically about the dispute between cattle rancher Cliven Bundy and the Bureau of Land Management.

But I can give you a general conclusion that I came to, decades ago:  The United States government should not be in the business of renting out range land.  In the past, that has often resulted in considerable subsidies to wealthy corporations (and may still, now, for all I know).  And that is just one of the many ways these relationships can go wrong, on both sides.

Instead of renting the land out, we should sell it at open auctions, with, perhaps, some advantages for anyone who has used a specific piece of land for grazing for years.

And, given our deficits, we can use the money.
- 7:40 PM, 14 April 2014   [link]


Narendra Modi has admitted that he is married.
Narendra Modi, currently the favorite to be India's next prime minister, had to make an unusual admission on Thursday.  The 63-year-old Modi, long famous for being a bachelor without any family, was in fact married.

In fact, he was forced to acknowledge, he gave his vows almost 50 years ago.
His parents and her parents arranged the marriage, but he seems not to have ever really accepted it.  The two did live together for a time, but he left permanently after three years, without ever divorcing her.   (His wife, Jashodaben Chimanlal Modi, became a teacher, lived a quiet life, is now retired, and appears to bear him no ill will.)

He did not leave her for another woman; in fact, quite the reverse.
What led Modi away, it seems, was the teachings of the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS), a strict Hindu organization that is reported to require a vow of celibacy.  Modi's time with the RSS eventually led to his leadership of India's second largest political party, Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), . . .
India has a long history of honoring, and sometimes even following, men like him, so this may not hurt him with the Indian electorate.

(Here are the Wikipedia articles on Modi and the BJP, with stronger-than-usual caveats, even for political articles.)
- 1:14 PM, 14 April 2014   [link]


"Billing Medicare While Financing Top Democrats"  That headline in last Thursday's New York Times is surprisingly explicit, as are the first four paragraphs of the article by Frances Robles and Eric Lipton.
Two Florida doctors who received the nation’s highest Medicare reimbursements in 2012 are both major contributors to Democratic Party causes, and they have turned to the political system in recent years to defend themselves against suspicions that they may have submitted fraudulent or excessive charges to the federal government.

The pattern of large Medicare payments and six-figure political donations shows up among several of the doctors whose payment records were released for the first time this week by the Department of Health and Human Services.  For years, the department refused to make the data public and finally did so only after being sued by the Wall Street Journal.

Topping the list is Dr. Salomon E. Melgen, 59, an ophthalmologist from North Palm Beach, Fla., who received $21 million in Medicare reimbursements in 2012 alone.
. . .
Dr. Melgen’s firm donated more than $700,000 to Majority PAC, a super PAC run by former aides to the Senate majority leader, Harry Reid, Democrat of Nevada.  The super PAC then spent $600,000 to help re-elect Senator Robert Menendez, Democrat of New Jersey, who is a close friend of Dr. Melgen’s.  Last year, Mr. Menendez himself became a target of investigation after the senator intervened on behalf of Dr. Melgen with federal officials and took flights on his private jet.
There are several possible explanations of those connections.  The obvious one is that the doctors are running dubious operations, and then buying influence to protect themselves.   But it is also possible, though less likely, that the doctors are running operations that look bad, but aren't, and are paying protection money.

And, of course, different explanations may fit different doctors.

Now that these records are public, we are going to be seeing many more such articles.   When we read them, we should not, automatically, assume that the doctors are guilty of defrauding the public.
- 8:09 AM, 14 April 2014   [link]


At First Glance, This Cut-Off Phone Call Sounds like an important clue to the disappearance of flight MH370.
The co-pilot of missing flight MH370 made a call from his mobile phone while the aircraft flew low over the west coast of Malaysia, it was revealed today as the U.S. denied reports the plane landed at a military base on the remote island of Diego Garcia.

Investigators have learned that the call was made from Fariq Abdul Hamid's mobile phone as the Boeing 777 flew low near the island of Penang, on the north of Malaysia's west coast.
But then you read a little further and suspect that it isn't.
'On why the call was cut off, it was likely because the aircraft was fast moving away from the tower and had not come under the coverage of the next one,' the paper said, quoting 'sources'.
One of the things that has puzzled me ever since the flight disappeared was that the authorities did not seem to be looking for phone calls or text messages from people on the plane.  Nor have I seen a discussion of what calls were possible, whether, for instance, any of the passengers had satellite phones, which will work almost everywhere.

But now we know that, at least for part of the flight, ordinary cell phone calls could be made, so at least the first step in that part of the investigation has been taken.
- 7:27 AM, 14 April 2014   [link]


One Last Sebelius-Obama Hug for the cameras.

As you can see, the two are barely able to fake it.

Before Kathleen Sebelius joined Obama's cabinet, she had had a remarkably successful — if sometimes unscrupulous — political career, and was thought by many to be a potential presidential candidate.  Now, she will, as Obama said, "go down in history" — way down.

I have a little sympathy for her, because Obama asked her to do the impossible, asked her to make the unworkable work, and because Obama did not give her the kind of help she so obviously needed to manage ObamaCare.  But I do blame her, as well as Obama, for not paying attention to what the people under her were trying to tell her, and for being, all too often, dishonest in what she told Congress.

And even that little was diminished this morning when I read this Timothy Carney column on her too close ties to lobbyists.
- 3:56 PM, 13 April 2014   [link]


How Much Has The Chávez Regime Spent Trying To Buy Influence In The United States?  At least $300 million, according to a new book, Chavistas En El Imperio (Chavistas in the Empire).
Perhaps nothing summarizes better the book, as Ocando’s revelation in the introduction, that Chavez spent US$ 300 million in propaganda in the US during his first ten years in power.   Thus, while Chávez was accusing Washington of trying to destabilize Venezuela, he was outspending Bush and Obama in promoting his revolution.  And his buddies in Government, were always (or are?) trying to make friends in the US, to defend their money, their properties and even guarantee protection sometime in the future.

In fact, the promotion was not only of the revolution, but even paying companies in the US to regularly show that Venezuela’s economic numbers were doing well.  ironically, while Chávez formed the Venezuelan Information Office and Eva Golinger was hired to show the US was conspiring in Venezuela, there was proof of all the money being spent very directly by the Venezuelan Government to promote itself in the US and very little proof was ever shown that the US was doing the same thing in Venezuela or elsewhere.
(The United States has an economy, very roughly, about 50 times as large as Venezuela's.  So, for a roughly equivalent expenditure, multiply that $300 million by 50.)

Not all of the money went to buying influence; some of it went to "the purchase of properties in the “Imperio” by the same people who were pledging their allegiance to the XXIst. Century Socialist revolution".

At the end of the post, Miguel Octavio wonders whether the United States has its own strategy toward Venezuela.  As far as I can tell, not at present.

The Bush administration appears to have decided that they best long-term strategy was to ignore Chávez and company, given other, more pressing problems.  President Obama seems to have thought at first that these enemies could be made into friends with a little personal diplomacy, not understanding that the regime could make far more use of the United States as an enemy, than as a friend.  Secretary of State Hillary Clinton mostly ignored Latin America, and John Kerry is following her example.

(Here's the book, for those who read Spanish.)
- 3:05 PM, 13 April 2014   [link]


If The Washingtonian Was Trying To Make Jay Carney And Claire Shipman Look Ridiculous, they succeeded.
The most decadent Beltway publication yet conceived, Washingtonian, has outdone itself with its latest celebration of what life is like inside the city fueled by your forcibly confiscated money.

The publication recently ran with a profile of White House Press Sec. Jay Carney‘s wife, ABC News personality and working mom Claire Shipman.  Carney’s two beautiful children are also profiled in the piece, but the profile itself is largely irrelevant.

What is worthy of dissection are the three featured images that add value to the profile.   And by “value,” we mean guffaws galore.
There were, for instance, those two Communist propaganda posters in the background — and there is much more besides those.

But I don't think that whoever did the profile was trying to humiliate Carney and Shipman, because the two participated in making themselves look foolish.  (They should have left the two kids out of the pictures, in my opinion.)

Shipman and Carney are big time journalists — and they are also, judging by that article, shallow, leftist poseurs, who should be covering something safe, like flower shows, rather than serious issues.  And neither should be a spokesman for the mayor of a medium-sized city, much less the president of the United States.

(It seems appropriate, somehow, that the profile is so obviously fake, appropriate that two "mainstream" journalists would willingly participate in a fraudulent portrait of themselves.)
- 2:36 PM, 12 April 2014   [link]


Archives

June 2002
July 2002
August 2002
September 2002
October 2002, Part 1 and Part 2
November 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
December 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3

January 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
February 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
March 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
April 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2004, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2004, Part 1, Part 2. Part 3, and Part 4
October 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2005, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2006, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2007, Part 1 and Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2007, Part 1 Part 2, and Part 3, and Part 4
June 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2008, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4
May 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3. and Part 4

January 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2012, Part 1, Part 2 Part 3, and Part 4
August 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3and Part 4
December 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4
March 2014, Part 1. Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2014, Part 1 and Part 2






Coming Soon
  • Plan 17 Conservatives
  • FDR and Waterboarding
  • How Long Do Wars Last?
  • Carbon, Carbon Dioxide, and Crescent Wrenches
  • De-Lawyering and Attorney General McKenna


Coming Eventually
  • JFK and Wiretaps
  • Green Republicans
  • The Rise and Fall and Rise of Black Voting
  • Abortion, Cleft Palates, and Europe
  • Kweisi Mfume's Children
  • Public Opinion During Other US Wars
  • Dual Loyalties
  • The Power Index
  • Baby Dancing
  • Jocks, but no Nerds
  • The Four Caliphs




Best Posts


Books


Strange Obama


The Unknown Bush


University Reform


Uncorrected Mistakes


Vote Fraud


The Gang of Four


Articles


Assignment Desk
(What's This?)


Columns


Common Mistakes
(What's This?)


Chomsky Cult Program


*new