Last updated:
12:13 PM, 1 September 2015



Jim Miller on Politics

  Email:
jimxc1 at gmail.com



What's he reading? Francis Parkman.

News Compilers
(Why These?)

A&L Daily
Drudge
egopnews.com
Hot Air
Jewish World Review
Lexis-Nexis
Lucianne
Mediaite
memeorandum
Monsters and Critics
*newser
Orbusmax
Rantburg
Real Clear Politics
SciTech Daily
Yahoo


Big Media
(Why These?)

Atlantic Monthly
BBC
CNN
Chosen Ilbo
*Daily Mail (UK)
*Deutsche Welle
Fox News
Globe and Mail (CA)
Guardian (UK)
Investor's Business Daily
Le Figaro (FR)
Le Monde (FR)
The Local (Sweden)
National Review
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The New Yorker
Politico
Seattle PI
Seattle Times
Slate
Slashdot
The Spectator (UK)
Der Spiegel
Telegraph (UK)
Times (UK)
El Universal
U. S. News
USA Today
Wall Street Journal
Washington Examiner
Washington Post
Washington Times


References:

Adherents
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Census Quick Facts
Dave Leip's Election Atlas
FactCheck
Federal Statistics
How Stuff Works
NationMaster
Refdesk
Snopes
StateMaster
Tax Facts
Unionstats
Wikipedia


Smart Media
(Why These?)

ABC News Note
*The American
The American Spectator
Michael Barone
City Journal
Commentary
Front Page Magazine
Michael Fumento
The Hill
Media Research
Michael Medved
New York Sun
Number Watch
PJ Media
Public Interest
Roll Call
Spinsanity
Townhall
The Weekly Standard


Blogs
(Why These?)

My Group Blog:
Sound Politics

Northwest:


The American Empire
AndrewsDad
Chief Brief
Clear Fog Blog
Coffeemonkey's weblog
Croker Sack
"DANEgerus"
Economic Freedom
Federal Way Conservative
Freedom Foundation
Hairy Thoughts
Huckleberry Online
Andy MacDonald
NW Republican
Orcinus
Public Interest Transportation Forum
<pudge/*>
Northwest Progressive Institute
*Progressive Majority
Matt Rosenberg
Seattle Blogger
Seattle Bubble
Washington Policy Center
West Sound Politics
Zero Base Thinking


Other US:


Ace of Spades HQ
Alien Corn
Ann Althouse
American Thinker
The Anchoress
Armies of Liberation
Art Contrarian
"Baldilocks"
Balloon Juice
Baseball Crank
La Shawn Barber
Beldar
Bleat
Big Government
Bookworm Room
Broadband Politics
Stuart Buck
Keith Burgess-Jackson
*Bush Center
Chef Mojo
Chicago Boyz
Classical Values
*College Insurrection
Confederate Yankee
Jules Crittenden
Daily Pundit
Discriminations
Gregory Djerejian
Daniel W. Drezner
Econlog
Econopundit
Election Law
John Ellis
Engage
Dean Esmay
Gary Farber
Fausta
FiveThirtyEight
Flares into Darkness
Flopping Aces
The Long War Journal
Gateway Pundit
Grasping Reality With Both Hands
Keith Hennessey
Hugh Hewitt
Siflay Hraka
Instapundit
Iowahawk
Joanne Jacobs
Jeff Jarvis
The Jawa Report
Brothers Judd
JustOneMinute
Kausfiles
Kesher Talk
Le-gal In-sur-rec-tion
Little Green Footballs
Megan McArdle
Michelle Malkin
Greg Mankiw
Marginal Revolution
Mazurland
Minding the Campus
The ModerateVoice
*The Monkey Cage Mudville Gazette
"neo-neocon"
Betsy Newmark
Newsbusters
No Watermelons Allowed
Ambra Nykola
*The Optimistic Conservative
The Ornery American
OxBlog
Parapundit
"Patterico"
Daniel Pipes
Polipundit
Political Arithmetik
Political Calculations
Pollster.com
Power and Control
Power Line
Protein Wisdom
QandO
Radio Equalizer
RedState
Riehl World View
Right Wing News
Rightwing Nuthouse
Dr. Sanity
Scrappleface
Screw Loose Change
Linda Seebach
Sense of Events
Joshua Sharf
Rand Simberg
Smart Politics
The Spirit of Enterprise
Stability For Our Time
*Strange Maps
The Strata-Sphere
Andrew Sullivan
Don Surber
Sweetness & Light
Taking Hayek Seriously
TalkLeft
Talking Points Memo
TaxProf
USS Neverdock
VDH's Private Papers
Verum Serum
Villainous Company
Volokh Conspiracy
Washington Monthly
Wizbang
Dr. Weevil
Matt Welch
Winds of Change
Meryl Yourish
zombietime


Canadians:


BlazingCatFur
Colby Cosh
Five Feet of Fury
Kate McMillan
Damian Penny
Bruce Rolston


Latin America:


Babalú
Caracas Chronicles
The Devil's Excrement
Venezuela News and Views


Overseas:


"Franco Aleman"
Bruce Bawer
Biased BBC
Tim Blair
*Andrew Bolt
Peter Briffa
Brussels Journal
*Bunyipitude
Butterflies and Wheels
Crooked Timber
Davids Medienkritik
Egyptian Sand Monkey
EU Referendum
Greenie Watch
Guido Fawkes
Harry's Place
Mick Hartley
Oliver Kamm
JG, Caesarea
*Le Monde Watch
¡No-Pasarán!
Fredrik Norman
Melanie Phillips
John Ray
samizdata
Shark Blog
Natalie Solent
Somtow's World
Bjørn Stærk
Laban Tall
*David Thompson
Michael Yon
This is Zimbabwe

Science Blogs:
The Blackboard
Cliff Mass Weather
Climate Audit
Climate Depot
Climate Science
*Judith Curry
Future Pundit
Gene Expression
The Loom
In The Pipeline
Roger Pielke Jr.
Real Climate
A Voyage To Arcturus
Watts Up With That?

Media Blogs:
Andrew Malcolm
Dori Monson
David Postman
Rhetorical Ammo
Tierney Lab
*White House Dossier

R-Rated:
Horse's A**
Huffington Post

*new



Here's A Different Birthright Citizenship Case:  For one thing, it's Canadian.
The sons of two Russian “deep cover” spies are fighting to keep the Canadian citizenship they acquired while their parents were living in Toronto under assumed identities and secretly working for Russian intelligence.

Alexander and Timothy Vavilov, 21 and 25, are the children of Elena Vavilova and Andrey Bezrukov, Russian operatives who were sent to Canada to develop “legends” that would mask their spying activities in the United States.
. . .
The brothers also returned to Russia at the time but are now claiming they are Canadians, and they have taken the government to court to be recognized as such, arguing that since they were born in Toronto they have a right to citizenship.
But, as you can see, that isn't the most interesting thing about the case.

Knowing nothing about the specifics of Canadian law, or their courts, I won't make a prediction on the outcome, though I think they should lose.

Incidentally, there were similar "deep cover" families here in the United States, and, if i recall correctly, some of them did have American-born children.

By way of Mr. Fur.

(Canada's citizenship laws appear to be broadly similar to ours, and, like ours, sometimes produce curious results.
In general, everyone born in Canada from 1947 or later acquires Canadian citizenship at birth.   In one 2008 case, a girl born to a Ugandan mother aboard a Northwest Airlines flight from Amsterdam to Boston was deemed a Canadian citizen for customs' purposes because she was born over Canada's airspace.[7]

The only exceptions concern children born to diplomats, where additional requirements apply.
In general, nations in the Americas have birthright citizenship, or, if you want to say it in Latin, jus soli; in general, nations elsewhere don't.)
- 12:13 PM, 1 September 2015   [link]


Iran President Rouhani Doesn't Want Iran To Vote On The "Deal"?   That's what the Associated Press says.
TEHRAN, Iran (AP) -- President Hassan Rouhani said Saturday he opposes a parliamentary vote on the landmark nuclear deal reached with world powers because terms of the agreement would turn into legal obligations if passed by lawmakers.

Rouhani told a news conference that the deal was a political understanding reached with the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council and Germany, not a pact requiring parliamentary approval.  The deal also says Iran would implement the terms voluntarily, he said.
If — and this is a big if — Rouhani is telling the truth, he wants Iran not to be bound by the "deal", even though they are getting very large economic benefits from it.  He thinks we should pay Iran now, but that we shouldn't even receive formal promises, in return.

But there are other possibilities, which is why I began that paragraph with "If".  I'll be looking for speculation on this from specialists on Iran.  As well, of course, as watching to see whether the Iranian parliament does vote on the "deal".

One thing is certain, however:  Rouhani must have great contempt for President Obama and Secretary Kerry, because he is telling them that the agreement they worked so hard for isn't really an agreement at all.

Will this statement make either Kerry or Obama call for the re-opening of negotiations, or even "clarification" from the Iranian government?  Probably not.

By way of Ed Morrissey.

(Here's the usual Wikipedia biography, with more than the usual caveats.  Interestingly, he has a PH. D. in Constitutional Law from a Scottish university.)
- 9:41 AM, 1 September 2015   [link]


Power Is Still Out from the Saturday storm in thousands of homes in this area.
More than 62,000 customers remain without power after Saturday's potent windstorm, and it could be two more days before electrical service is restored to all areas, officials said.

Outages on Monday morning stretch from Whatcom County down to Olympia.

Puget Sound Energy says it still has 34,000 homes and businesses still affected. Snohomish PUD is down to 25,000 customers without power.  And Seattle City Light is working to get about 3,700 back on the grid.
(I fixed an obvious typo.)

KOMO is just including the metropolitan areas in Washington state.  The storm hit southern British Columbia hard too, and stretched south to at least Portland.
- 4:13 AM, 31 August 2015   [link]


Stereo Systems, Monitors, Mice, And Keyboards:  I am about to become an OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) again, about to assemble a new personal computer.

And in making my choices for parts I find that I am following a plan analogous to the advice I was given, decades ago, on assembling a stereo system.  Back in that Pre-Cambrian era, young men usually bought something to play music on after they had been working for some months at their first full-time job.

(If you are younger than I am, you may find that hard to believe, but it's true.  We did have inexpensive AM radios, but usually no more than that.)

When I started thinking about assembling the components for a stereo system — cartridge, turntable, pre-amplifier, amplifier, tuner, speakers, and, possibly, a tape deck — I sought advice from knowledgeable friends.  What they told me was that I should spend about half of my budget on the two ends of the system, the cartridge and turntable, and the speakers, that, however much I might be fascinated by whizzy electronic gadgets, I would get the best sound if I spent most on where the tiny bumps in the record grooves got translated into an electrical signal, and where the electrical signal was turned into sound waves.

It was good advice, and the speakers I chose way back then lasted me for decades.

For a personal computer system, the analogous parts are the keyboard and mouse, and the monitor.  As it happens, I have an ancient IBM Model M keyboard, which works fine, though someone, me I suppose, should clean it some time.  Similarly, right now I am using a Microsoft wheel mouse, which also works fine.  (I've had good luck with IBM and Logitech mice, too.)

The monitor I am using now, a Viewsonic, also works well, though its resolution (1680 x 1050) is not up to the 1080p standard.  And so I have ordered a new monitor, which will be the most expensive piece of my new system, costing more, probably, than the CPU and the motherboard, combined.

Which new monitor?   This one.   Which I chose because it will fit on my desk without rearranging everything, and because of the high quality of Viewsonic monitors, especially their top-of-the line monitors.  I should add that the one I have now has really annoying minimalist controls, but you are likely to have to use them only once or twice, so that isn't a big objection.

And I'll probably go to a two-monitor set up, so the old monitor won't be wasted.

(It is still possible to buy those Model M keyboards, either used, or new from Unicomp.   If color coordination were important to me, I'd get a black one to replace my old beige one.   The prices on them will show you how much people like me have come to value them.)
- 3:36 PM, 31 August 2015   [link]


Paul Krugman Can Be A Great Joke Teller:  As he reminded us in today's column.

There are a number of good jokes in the column; here are my two favorites:
I know, now I'm supposed to be evenhanded and point out equivalent figures on the Democratic side.  But there really aren't any; in modern America, cults of personality built around undeserving politicians seem to be a Republican thing.
. . .
And Hillary Clinton is the subject of a sort of anti-cult of personality, whose most ordinary actions are portrayed as nefarious.  (No, the email thing doesn't rise to he level of a "scandal".)
Those familiar with the former Enron consultant's record may protest that Krugman doesn't intend those as jokes, probably doesn't even realize how many people will find them absurd.

That's true, but unintentional jokes can be just as funny as intentional jokes, and so we should give Krugman credit for jokes that would crack up some audiences, even though he may not realize why they are laughing.

To be fair, Krugman does seem to realize that some — in the age of Obama — will think the first one is funny, but he quickly dismisses the idea.

(Fun fact:  Krugman was also a member of the Reagan administration, as well as an Enron consultant.  I don't know whether that is where he picked up his irrational hatred of Republicans.

The first and best public editor at the Times, Daniel Okrent, identified Krugman's fundamental problem as a columnist:  Krugman has "the disturbing habit of shaping, slicing and selectively citing numbers in a fashion that pleases his acolytes but leaves him open to substantive assaults".  In a word, Krugman is often dishonest — which doesn't seem to bother many people on the left.)
- 6:41 AM, 31 August 2015   [link]


Today's New Yorker Cartoon made me laugh out loud.

(That happens less often than you might think, for someone who loves jokes as much as I do.   I often smile at a joke, and then immediately begin studying it to see why it's funny, and whether I can use it.)
- 5:55 AM, 31 August 2015   [link]


College Tuition Can Go Down:  We have, right here in Washington state, what I like to call an "existence proof".
With his parents out of work and an office job paying his bills, college junior Shane Bang remembers the anxiety he felt when his younger brother told his family he was headed to University of Washington in the fall.

Then they got an unexpected lifeline.  A law that took effect last month slashed tuition at public colleges and universities over the next two academic years as much as 20 percent for all Washington students, rich and poor alike.

They were the only such cost-cuts in the nation in 2015, and the first in the state's history, Republicans say, and will save the family $6,981, by university estimates.
Why did the reporter mention just Republicans?

Because this was very much a Republican initiative, passed by the Republican-controlled state senate, and kept in the budget during the bargaining with the Democrats that followed.  (Many Democrats did vote for it on final passage — but it wasn't their idea.  You can find more on the politics and background, in this article.)

To be fair, it was easier for the Republicans to put this in the budget, and recompense the state schools with more aid because economists are predicting a sizable increase — about 11 percent in this biennium — in state revenues.

Nonetheless, it shows what can be done.

Two other Republicans have shown what can be done to control costs at state colleges and universities,  Republican Bruce D. Benson took over Colorado University at a bad time for budgeting, 2008, and has has, he says in a column in last week's Wall Street Journal turned the university around.
Universities aren’t known for economic efficiency, and prerecession CU was no different—which meant there were plenty of cost savings to be found throughout the system.  In fiscal 2010-11, we streamlined bureaucracy and let go of 148 administrative staff—a painful down-sizing for some, yes, but a right-sizing for the school that helped preserve many other jobs.   After hearing about CU’s dire financial situation, about a quarter of the faculty volunteered to teach one additional course for modest compensation increases of about $4,000 each.

We cut red tape, trimming the school’s administrative policies to 86 from 210—or to 260 pages from 650.  For instance, we raised the cost threshold at which an official event requires paperwork approval to $500 from $100, eliminating 8,000 forms—and the work of processing them—annually.
. . .
The result of these changes is that the university system’s administrative overhead is 37% below that of national peers, according to data from the U.S. Education Department.
Republican Mitch Daniels froze tuition, and cut overall costs for students, at Purdue.
The total cost of attending Purdue has fallen since Daniels assumed Purdue’s presidency, despite a trend at Big Ten institutions of rising costs.  Total loan debt among the student body has also fallen 18% or $40 million.[116]  Tuition at Purdue, prior to Daniels’ arrival had increased every year since 1976.[117]  Two months after Daniels assumed his role as president, Purdue announced it would freeze tuition for two years, later extending the freeze for a third year.  Because of the consecutive freezes, four-year graduates from the class of 2016 will become the first in at least 40 years to leave Purdue having never experienced a tuition increase.[118]
. . .
Daniels also reduced meal plan rates by 10 percent and cut the university's cooperative education fees which had increased every year prior on record.  The meal cost reduction and fee cut affected 10,000 students and saved them and their families $3.5 million.[122]   In fall 2014, Daniels announced a deal with Amazon to save students on textbooks and provide students, faculty and staff with free one day shipping to locations on campus.[123]
There's much more in the Benson column and the Daniels biography, on how the two Republicans were able to cut costs.  Both seem to have a good sense of what can be done — and what can't, what is politically possible — and what isn't.

Neither picked fights they were sure to lose.

(Mathematicians probably would not care for the way I use the term, since they use it, or "constructive proof", to describe a proof in which you show that an object can be constructed — without necessarily constructing it.  But I'm discussing public policy here, not formal mathematics.)
- 6:40 PM, 30 August 2015   [link]


"Textbooks Are A Bargain", Says Professor Greg Mankiw:  If, that is, you are comparing them to Harvard tuition.
In other words, over the past 140 years, textbook prices have risen only 114-fold, whereas Harvard tuition has risen 377-fold.

Over this period, the CPI has risen 22-fold.  So the real price of textbooks has increased about 5-fold, or a bit more than 1 percent per year.
And the real price of Harvard tuition has risen about 16- or 17-fold.

(As you can see, I had good reasons for choosing college textbooks and tuition as examples for my first "small monopoly" post.  Incidentally, if you look around carefully, you can find many small monopolies.  One of the things I object to about ObamaCare is that it is designed to increase the number of small monopolies, especially in rural areas.

Does Professor Mankiw know he is reaping monopoly profits?  I'm sure he does, though I don't recall him mentioning that in a post.)
- 1:28 PM, 30 August 2015   [link]


November Storm — In August:  Yesterday, a powerful storm hit this area.
Powerful winds toppled trees and power lines across the Pacific Northwest on Saturday, causing two deaths in the Seattle area and knocking out electricity to nearly 500,000 customers.

A man was killed when a tree fell on his Subaru in Gig Harbor, Washington, around 11am.   His 3-year-old daughter was in the back seat, but she was not hurt.

In Federal Way, a 10-year-old girl playing outside at a friend's birthday party was struck and killed by a falling limb from an alder tree.
(Gig Harbor is on the other side of the Puget Sound from Seattle; Federal Way is south of Seattle.)

This kind of storm is common in Novembers here, but almost unknown at this time of the year.  In fact, despite its reputation, the Seattle area gets very little rain during the two months after the Fourth of July.

If you want many more details Cliff Mass has them.  He says: "This is perhaps the strongest August storm on record---certainly the most impressive in my memory.

Fortunately — credit where due — the local meteorologists gave us plenty of warning, with very accurate forecasts.  They even warned us that more trees would come down than usual, because it has been so dry, and the trees still have leaves on them.  The trees were less able to hold on to the dry ground, and more likely to accumulate a heavy burden of water.

The rain that crossed the Cascades helped the fire fighters there; the gusty winds made their job worse.  Fortunately, the weather forecasters are predicting cooler weather, and sowers for the next week.

(The storm had almost no effect on me.  I just stayed inside most of the day and avoided working with my computer, as I usually do when I fear the power may go out at any time.)
- 11:56 AM, 30 August 2015   [link]


Which Presidential Candidate Has Spent The Most On Polls?   Hillary Clinton, by a very large margin.  In fact, her total of $1,086,649 is 75 percent more than all the Republican candidates' spending on polls, combined.

Ted Cruz is tops among Republicans at $185,693, followed by Rand Paul, Jeb Bush, Lindsey Graham, Ben Carson, and Donald Trump.  (Trump, of course, started much later than the others.)
- 8:30 AM, 28 August 2015   [link]


Archives

June 2002
July 2002
August 2002
September 2002
October 2002, Part 1 and Part 2
November 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
December 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3

January 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
February 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
March 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
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May 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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August 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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January 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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October 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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January 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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June 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2005, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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June 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2006, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2007, Part 1 and Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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August 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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October 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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August 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3. and Part 4

January 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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June 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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June 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2012, Part 1, Part 2 Part 3, and Part 4
August 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3and Part 4
December 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2013, , Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4
March 2014, Part 1. Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2015, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2015, Part 1






Coming Soon
  • Plan 17 Conservatives
  • FDR and Waterboarding
  • How Long Do Wars Last?
  • Carbon, Carbon Dioxide, and Crescent Wrenches
  • De-Lawyering and Attorney General McKenna


Coming Eventually
  • JFK and Wiretaps
  • Green Republicans
  • The Rise and Fall and Rise of Black Voting
  • Abortion, Cleft Palates, and Europe
  • Kweisi Mfume's Children
  • Public Opinion During Other US Wars
  • Dual Loyalties
  • The Power Index
  • Baby Dancing
  • Jocks, but no Nerds
  • The Four Caliphs




Best Posts


Books


Strange Obama


The Unknown Bush


University Reform


Uncorrected Mistakes


Vote Fraud


The Gang of Four


Articles


Assignment Desk
(What's This?)


Columns


Common Mistakes
(What's This?)


Chomsky Cult Program


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