Last updated:
4:36 PM, 1 July 2016



Jim Miller on Politics

  Email:
jimxc1 at gmail.com



What's he reading? Francis Parkman.

News Compilers
(Why These?)

A&L Daily
Drudge
Hot Air
Jewish World Review
Lexis-Nexis
Lucianne
Mediaite
memeorandum
Monsters and Critics
*newser
Orbusmax
Rantburg
Real Clear Politics
SciTech Daily
Yahoo


Big Media
(Why These?)

Atlantic Monthly
BBC
CNN
Chosen Ilbo
*Daily Mail (UK)
*Deutsche Welle
Fox News
Globe and Mail (CA)
Guardian (UK)
Investor's Business Daily
Le Figaro (FR)
Le Monde (FR)
The Local (Sweden)
National Review
New York Times
The New Yorker
Politico
Seattle PI
Seattle Times
Slate
Slashdot
The Spectator (UK)
Der Spiegel
Telegraph (UK)
Times (UK)
El Universal
U. S. News
USA Today
Wall Street Journal
Washington Examiner
Washington Post
Washington Times


References:

Adherents
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Census Quick Facts
Dave Leip's Election Atlas
FactCheck
Federal Statistics
How Stuff Works
NationMaster
Refdesk
Snopes
StateMaster
Tax Facts
Unionstats
Wikipedia


Smart Media
(Why These?)

ABC News Note
*The American
The American Spectator
Michael Barone
City Journal
Commentary
Front Page Magazine
Michael Fumento
The Hill
Media Research
Michael Medved
New York Sun
Number Watch
PJ Media
Public Interest
Roll Call
Spinsanity
Townhall
The Weekly Standard


Blogs
(Why These?)

My Group Blog:
Sound Politics

Northwest:


The American Empire
AndrewsDad
Chief Brief
Clear Fog Blog
Coffeemonkey's weblog
Croker Sack
"DANEgerus"
Economic Freedom
Federal Way Conservative
Freedom Foundation
Hairy Thoughts
Huckleberry Online
Andy MacDonald
NW Republican
Orcinus
Public Interest Transportation Forum
<pudge/*>
Northwest Progressive Institute
*Progressive Majority
Matt Rosenberg
Seattle Blogger
Seattle Bubble
Washington Policy Center
West Sound Politics
Zero Base Thinking


Other US:


Ace of Spades HQ
Alien Corn
Ann Althouse
American Thinker
The Anchoress
Armies of Liberation
Art Contrarian
"Baldilocks"
Balloon Juice
Baseball Crank
La Shawn Barber
Beldar
Bleat
Big Government
Bookworm Room
Broadband Politics
Stuart Buck
Keith Burgess-Jackson
*Bush Center
Chef Mojo
Chicago Boyz
Classical Values
*College Insurrection
Confederate Yankee
Jules Crittenden
Daily Pundit
Discriminations
Gregory Djerejian
Daniel W. Drezner
Econlog
Econopundit
Election Law
John Ellis
Engage
Dean Esmay
Gary Farber
Fausta
FiveThirtyEight
Flares into Darkness
Flopping Aces
The Long War Journal
Gateway Pundit
Grasping Reality With Both Hands
Keith Hennessey
Hugh Hewitt
Siflay Hraka
Instapundit
Iowahawk
Joanne Jacobs
Jeff Jarvis
The Jawa Report
Brothers Judd
JustOneMinute
Kausfiles
Kesher Talk
Le-gal In-sur-rec-tion
Little Green Footballs
Megan McArdle
Michelle Malkin
Greg Mankiw
Marginal Revolution
Mazurland
Minding the Campus
The ModerateVoice
*The Monkey Cage Mudville Gazette
"neo-neocon"
Betsy Newmark
Newsbusters
No Watermelons Allowed
Ambra Nykola
*The Optimistic Conservative
The Ornery American
OxBlog
Parapundit
"Patterico"
Daniel Pipes
Polipundit
Political Arithmetik
Political Calculations
Pollster.com
Power and Control
Power Line
Protein Wisdom
QandO
Radio Equalizer
RedState
Riehl World View
Right Wing News
Rightwing Nuthouse
Dr. Sanity
Scrappleface
Screw Loose Change
Linda Seebach
Sense of Events
Joshua Sharf
Rand Simberg
Smart Politics
The Spirit of Enterprise
Stability For Our Time
*Strange Maps
The Strata-Sphere
Andrew Sullivan
Don Surber
Sweetness & Light
Taking Hayek Seriously
TalkLeft
Talking Points Memo
TaxProf
USS Neverdock
VDH's Private Papers
Verum Serum
Villainous Company
Volokh Conspiracy
Washington Monthly
Wizbang
Dr. Weevil
Matt Welch
Winds of Change
Meryl Yourish
zombietime


Canadians:


BlazingCatFur
Colby Cosh
Five Feet of Fury
Kate McMillan
Damian Penny
Bruce Rolston


Latin America:


Babalú
Caracas Chronicles
The Devil's Excrement
Venezuela News and Views


Overseas:


"Franco Aleman"
Bruce Bawer
Biased BBC
Tim Blair
*Andrew Bolt
Peter Briffa
Brussels Journal
Butterflies and Wheels
Crooked Timber
Davids Medienkritik
Egyptian Sand Monkey
EU Referendum
Greenie Watch
Guido Fawkes
Harry's Place
Mick Hartley
Oliver Kamm
JG, Caesarea
*Le Monde Watch
¡No-Pasarán!
Fredrik Norman
Melanie Phillips
*Political Betting
John Ray
samizdata
Shark Blog
Natalie Solent
Somtow's World
Bjørn Stærk
Laban Tall
*David Thompson
Michael Yon

Science Blogs:
The Blackboard
Cliff Mass Weather
Climate Audit
Climate Depot
Climate Science
*Judith Curry
Future Pundit
Gene Expression
The Loom
In The Pipeline
Roger Pielke Jr.
Real Climate
A Voyage To Arcturus
Watts Up With That?

Media Blogs:
Andrew Malcolm
Dori Monson
David Postman
Rhetorical Ammo
Tierney Lab
*White House Dossier

R-Rated:
Horse's A**
Huffington Post

*new



Pseudo-Random Thoughts


Happy Birthday!  To our Canadian friends, who are celebrating Canada Day.  (Which they used to call "Dominion Day".)

Canadian flag

Since Canada was founded in 1867, this is their 149th birthday.  The man most responsible for that founding was Canada's first Prime Minister, John Macdonald.

Recycled, with some changes, from 2008.

(Picture notes:  This flag appears every Canada Day, a few blocks from where I live, along with the American flag, which you can just see behind it.  In 2008, I finally met the couple that own the flags.  He's American; she's Canadian.  And the two seem to be getting along very well, which may be a lesson for our two nations.)
-49369 PM, 1 July 2016   [link]


Steven Hayward's Weekly Collection pf pictures.

My favorite?  Probably the "I love Brexit."
- 4:17 PM, 1 July 2016   [link]


Credit Where Due On Nuclear Power:  Today, the New York Times ran an op-ed, refuting the editorial that so annoyed me. three days ago.

Here's how Michael Shellenberger begins:
California has a reputation as a leader in battling climate change, and so when Pacific Gas & Electric and environmental groups announced a plan last week to close the state’s last nuclear plant, Diablo Canyon, and replace much of the electricity it generates with power from renewable resources, the deal was widely applauded.

It shouldn’t have been.  If the proposal is approved by the state’s Public Utilities Commission, California’s carbon dioxide emissions will either increase or decline far less than if Diablo Canyon’s two reactors, which generated about 9 percent of the state’s electricity last year, remained in operation.  If this deal goes through, California will become a model of how not to deal with climate change.
That's clear enough.

As I have said before, if you think climate change is a threat, and can do arithmetic, you should favor the expansion of nuclear power.
- 4:15 PM, 30 June 2016   [link]


Mark Salter Has Strong Opinions about Barack Obama — and Donald Trump.
His election would endanger the security of the United States and our standing in the world.  The widely respected geopolitical analysis firm, the Economist Intelligence Unit, declared his election a top 10 global threat.  I believe President Obama has been the worst foreign policy president in my lifetime.   But he’s Winston Churchill compared to Donald Trump.

Trump encourages the proliferation of nuclear weapons, and hints at encouraging their use.  He welcomes relationships with the world’s worst tyrants, even homicidal madmen like North Korea’s Kim Jong-un.  He seems to hold rivals in higher regard than allies.  He professes admiration for Vladimir Putin, maybe our most determined and dangerous adversary.  The current administration has proved half-hearted in its opposition to the ruthless Russian autocrat’s troublemaking.  But Trump seems almost to take Putin’s side.
Would Trump be even worse on foreign policy than Obama?  Maybe.   His reckless talk about nuclear weapons is not a plus. nor is his undiplomatic way of speaking.

(It's my impression that national security conservatives are more likely to oppose Trump than social conservatives.  Or, to put it more concretely, those who worry most about nuclear war are more likely to oppose Trump than those who worry most about abortion.)
- 3:22 PM, 30 June 2016   [link]


We Don't Have A Commander In Chief:   That's my initial reaction to news stories on the Benghazi Report.

Let me repeat, initial reaction to news stories.  I haven't read the report, and probably won't take the time to read more than a few parts of it.  Nor have I even studied the more serious articles on the report.

With that caveat out of the way, let me summarize what the key American actors did, and did not, do during the attack.

President Obama was told about the attack, authorized our military to do something about it, and disappeared, probably going to bed.  The next morning, he did not bother to take his daily intelligence briefing.

Secretary of State Clinton seems to have known it was a terrorist attack, but does not seem to have worked to get military rescuers to the scene, promptly.

Secretary of Defense Panetta tried to get rescuers to the scene, bu was blocked for hours.

Apparently, no one was in charge; there was no commander in chief.

And I don't think we have one now, either.

But I might change my mind about then and now, after I learn more about the report.
- 11:49 AM, 30 June 2016   [link]


What Matt Drudge Won't Tell You About Polls:   Yesterday, Drudge was trumpeting one of the two polls mentioned in this Hot Air post — and it wasn't the Ballotpedia poll.  (Today he is pushing a Rasmussen poll that looks dubious to me.)

As I have said before, Drudge has chosen, in recent months, not to share stories about Trump that reflect badly on the Donald.  That won't be a problem for you, as long as you don't rely too much on Drudge, as long as you look for sources that give you anti-Trump stories.

The best strategy, where possible, is to look for all the data, and you can do that with the sites that average all the polls, for example.

(My own view on the polls?  Probably that poll average is about right; probably Hillary Clinton has gained a little in recent weeks.   Probably.

Incidentally, the Ballotpedia findings are worth a quick look, if you wonder how well other Republican candidates might be doing, right now.)
- 11:02 AM, 30 June 2016   [link]


Today's New Yorker Cartoon isn't bad.  And you may get some bitter sweet pleasure from the political cartoon below it.

Today's Pepper and Salt cartoon shows a realistic picture of Seattle traffic.
- 10:07 AM, 30 June 2016   [link]


French President François Hollande Is Not Doing Well in the polls.
BAROMÈTRE LE FIGARO MAGAZINE - À un an de la présidentielle, la cote de confiance du chef de l'État chute à 12%, un niveau jamais atteint.

Douze pour cent!  Jamais président de la République n'était tombé aussi bas! Jamais la cote d'un chef de l'État mesurée par TNS Sofres pour Le Figaro Magazine n'avait atteint un tel plancher.
My French is not good enough to give you an exact translation, but I can give you the essence:

With less than a year remaining in his (five year) term, confidence in President Hollande has fallen to 12 percent, a record low.

(Fun fact:   Hollande is not only president of France, he's also "Co-Prince of Andorra".)
- 5:32 PM, 29 June 2016   [link]


Jeremy Corbyn Has Been Rejected By The Group He Is Supposed To Lead — But May Still Be Supported By The Group That Elected Him:  First, the rejection:
A motion of no confidence in Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has been passed by the party's MPs.

The 172-40 vote, which is not binding, follows resignations from the shadow cabinet and calls on Mr Corbyn to quit.

Mr Corbyn said the ballot had "no constitutional legitimacy" and said he would not "betray" the members who voted for him by resigning.
(The Daily Mail has a neat set of pictures showing how he has lost almost his entire shadow cabinet.)

Most of the Labour MPs have been unhappy with him from the start, and for many his failure to campaign vigorously for Britain to remain in the European Union made them decide he had to go.  (Many criticized him for failing to make a few joint appearances with Prime Minister Cameron, or show even a little enthusiasm for staying in the European Union.)

So, he will be challenged for the Labour leadership, but he may survive because the left wing activists who elected him won't give up easily.

(Here's a partial explanation of how a leadership contest would begin, and here's some speculation on who can and will vote if there is a leadership contest.)
- 4:09 PM, 29 June 2016   [link]


Tree Huggers At Oakmont:  Golfers probably know this story already, but it was new to me.
The transformation of Oakmont Country Club began in the cloak of darkness. During the mid-1990s, a dozen groundskeepers would set out at 4 a.m. most days and take aim at a tree.  Guided only by the headlights of a cart, they would cut the tree down, grind the stump, conceal the area with sod and remove all evidence of what they had just done.

This was how touchy the issue of tree removal was:  It began in near-secrecy and continued even as members of the venerable Pittsburgh-area club threatened lawsuits to stop it.  But when the U.S. Open returns to Oakmont for a record ninth time this week, it will represent a closing bookend in the case of chainsaw v. trees.
Some will be saddened by the loss of the trees; others, me for instance, will hope no groundskeepers were injured, working in the dark.  Golfers can argue over whether the tree removal improved he course.
- 12:15 PM, 29 June 2016   [link]


This Suspect Line-Up includes one who may not be a local.
- 10: AM, 29 June 2016   [link]


Worth Reading:  Jay Nordlinger's post, "Donald Trump and concerns about fascism".

Sample:.
He mainly talks of “strong” versus “weak.”  Strength is better than weakness, of course.  But an exaltation of strength can be strange.

In 1990, he gave an interview to Playboy magazine. The Soviet Union was in interesting, uncertain condition.  Democratic protesters were getting bolder.  Trump said, “Russia is out of control and the leadership knows it.  That’s my problem with Gorbachev.  Not a firm enough hand.”

His interviewer asked, “You mean firm hand as in China?”

Trump answered, “When the students poured into Tiananmen Square, the Chinese government almost blew it.  Then they were vicious, they were horrible, but they put it down with strength.  That shows you the power of strength.”

This sounds admiring to me.
And to me, too.

As Nordlinger says, later on:  "T:rump seems to hold the attitude of a king, or dictator."

Which is, to say the least, un-American.

And it is also impractical.  As almost all our presidents knew, before Richard Neustadt said so in his book, "the President is actually rather weak in the U.S. government, being unable to effect significant change without the approval of the Congress, . . ."

That's less true now than when Neustadt wrote, thanks to the growth in power of our bureaucracies, but it is still basically true.  An American president has much less power than a French president, and less power than most British prime ministers.

Does Trump understand how limited the powers of a president are, if he doesn't have the support of majorities in Congress?  As always with Trump, it's hard to tell, but I suspect not.
- 3:40 PM, 28 June 2016   [link]


Here's a Novel Argument For Electing Donald Trump:   The first comment after this post on recent polls complains that Trump is certain to lose.

Jimmie Edwards' reply begins:
Putting your vitural aside you might want to consider, should Trump become President, he would be far easier to impeach whereas there is no way Hillary would ever be impeached.  Following that thought, should Trump name someone like Gingrich as VP, then the possibilities are endless.
(I am pretty sure he means "vitriol", and impeached and convicted.)

Unfortunately, he doesn't say what crimes he expects Trump to commit, which would lead to an impeachment.

It doesn't seem like a practical plan, but I will admit that, party strengths being roughly equal, it probably is easier to impeach a Republican than a Democrat.  But it is difficult, just as the founders intended, to get the two-thirds majority required to convict a president.

(One of the chapters in Profiles in Courage tells the story of Kansas Senator Edmund Ross, who voted to acquit President Andrew Johnson, preventing a two-thirds majority.)
- 10:32 AM, 28 June 2016   [link]


This Cartoon Leaves Me Wondering just what happened.

(And I haven't watched enough of the show to even guess.)
- 9:54 AM, 28 June 2016   [link]


 
Two Newspapers In One (Nuclear Power):  In April, New York Times columnist Eduardo Porter wrote a thoughtful column, noting that liberals were inconsistent on climate change; they believed in climate change, but were opposed to the best way we have now to reduce its effects.
Still, liberal biases may be most dangerous in the context of climate change, the most significant scientific and technological challenge of our time.  For starters, they stand against the only technology with an established track record of generating electricity at scale while emitting virtually no greenhouse gases: nuclear power.

Only 35 percent of Democrats, compared with 60 percent of Republicans, favor building more nuclear power plants, according to a poll by the Pew Research Center.

It is the G.O.P. that is closer to the scientific consensus.  According to a separate Pew poll of members of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, 65 percent of scientists want more nuclear power too.
So Republicans don't see climate change as a great threat, but are willing to do something practical about it, and Democrats hold the opposite position.

What is true of Republicans and Democrats is also true of our two most recent presidents.  President Bush was skeptical that climate change was a disaster about to happen, but backed nuclear power; President Obama is sure that climate change is a great danger, but has done nothing significant to promote nuclear power.   (During the 2008 campaign, I concluded that Obama was in favor of nuclear power in principle, but opposed to it in practice.)

In fact, while Obama has been in office, a few nuclear plants have closed, and others have scheduled closings.

Which brings us to an editorial in today's New York Times, "Good News From Diablo Canyon".  The editorial writers are delighted that a nuclear power plant, Diablo Canyon, which supplies 10 percent of California's electricity, will be shut down in 2024.  (They believe that the power needed then can come from wind power, and other such sources.)

I wonder if any of the editorial writers read Porter's column, wonder if they know that he may think they are anti-science.

(This isn't the first time I've run across an editorial in the Times that made me wonder whether the editorial writers read their own newspaper.)
- 8:17 PM, 27 June 2016   [link]


 
Election Scorecard, 6/27:  Not much has changed since last week.

The polling average is almost the same, with Hillary Clinton's lead declining from 7.6 to 6.8 percent.  The English bettors have not changed their general election bets much either, though they now see it as more likely that Donald Trump will win the Republican nomination (86.8 to 91.3).

One surprise in the polls:  The latest Washington Post poll gives Clinton a lead of 12 percent (51-39).  As I said last week, a revolt against Trump at the convention is more likely if he is trailing badly in the polls.)
- 11:18 AM, 27 June 2016   [link]


 
Odd Stories From the Brexit campaign.

I get a kick out of these funny election stories, perhaps because they help me keep perspective on the results.

(If you are wondering about those bananas, you can find an explanation here.   And here's a list of .EU regulations, some real, some not.)
- 10:26 AM, 27 June 2016   [link]


 
Whatever It Is, they're against it.

(Semi-serious thought:  One way to understand student protests around the world is to see them as young men testing the power and resolve of older men.  This is not to say that there aren't real issues involved; most of the time there are.   But the generational conflict is almost always a part of these struggles.  That helps explain why, for instance, in one generation students call for fewer restrictions on free of speech, and in a later generation, students call for more restrictions on free speech.  Each time, the students chose an issue that would provoke a conflict with older men (and now women.))
- 9:56 AM, 27 June 2016   [link]


Archives

June 2002
July 2002
August 2002
September 2002
October 2002, Part 1 and Part 2
November 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
December 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3

January 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
February 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
March 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
April 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2003, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2004, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2004, Part 1, Part 2. Part 3, and Part 4
October 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2005, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2006, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2007, Part 1 and Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2007, Part 1 Part 2, and Part 3, and Part 4
June 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2007, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2008, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4
May 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2009, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3. and Part 4

January 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2010, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2012, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2012, Part 1, Part 2 Part 3, and Part 4
August 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3and Part 4
December 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2013, , Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4
March 2014, Part 1. Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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July 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2015, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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July 2016, Part 1>






Coming Soon
  • Plan 17 Conservatives
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  • How Long Do Wars Last?
  • Carbon, Carbon Dioxide, and Crescent Wrenches
  • De-Lawyering and Attorney General McKenna


Coming Eventually
  • JFK and Wiretaps
  • Green Republicans
  • The Rise and Fall and Rise of Black Voting
  • Abortion, Cleft Palates, and Europe
  • Kweisi Mfume's Children
  • Public Opinion During Other US Wars
  • Dual Loyalties
  • The Power Index
  • Baby Dancing
  • Jocks, but no Nerds
  • The Four Caliphs




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