Last updated:
4:49 PM, 24 July 2016



Jim Miller on Politics

  Email:
jimxc1 at gmail.com



What's he reading? Francis Parkman.

News Compilers
(Why These?)

A&L Daily
Drudge
Hot Air
Jewish World Review
Lexis-Nexis
Lucianne
Mediaite
memeorandum
Monsters and Critics
*newser
Orbusmax
Rantburg
Real Clear Politics
SciTech Daily
Yahoo


Big Media
(Why These?)

Atlantic Monthly
BBC
CNN
Chosen Ilbo
*Daily Mail (UK)
*Deutsche Welle
Fox News
Globe and Mail (CA)
Guardian (UK)
Investor's Business Daily
Le Figaro (FR)
Le Monde (FR)
The Local (Sweden)
National Review
New York Times
The New Yorker
Politico
Seattle PI
Seattle Times
Slate
Slashdot
The Spectator (UK)
Der Spiegel
Telegraph (UK)
Times (UK)
El Universal
U. S. News
USA Today
Wall Street Journal
Washington Examiner
Washington Post
Washington Times


References:

Adherents
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Census Quick Facts
Dave Leip's Election Atlas
FactCheck
Federal Statistics
How Stuff Works
NationMaster
Refdesk
Snopes
StateMaster
Tax Facts
Unionstats
Wikipedia


Smart Media
(Why These?)

ABC News Note
*The American
The American Spectator
Michael Barone
City Journal
Commentary
Front Page Magazine
Michael Fumento
The Hill
Media Research
Michael Medved
New York Sun
Number Watch
PJ Media
Public Interest
Roll Call
Spinsanity
Townhall
The Weekly Standard


Blogs
(Why These?)

My Group Blog:
Sound Politics

Northwest:


The American Empire
AndrewsDad
Chief Brief
Clear Fog Blog
Coffeemonkey's weblog
Croker Sack
"DANEgerus"
Economic Freedom
Federal Way Conservative
Freedom Foundation
Hairy Thoughts
Huckleberry Online
Andy MacDonald
NW Republican
Orcinus
Public Interest Transportation Forum
<pudge/*>
Northwest Progressive Institute
*Progressive Majority
Matt Rosenberg
Seattle Blogger
Seattle Bubble
Washington Policy Center
West Sound Politics
Zero Base Thinking


Other US:


Ace of Spades HQ
Alien Corn
Ann Althouse
American Thinker
The Anchoress
Armies of Liberation
Art Contrarian
"Baldilocks"
Balloon Juice
Baseball Crank
La Shawn Barber
Beldar
Bleat
Big Government
Bookworm Room
Broadband Politics
Stuart Buck
Keith Burgess-Jackson
*Bush Center
Chef Mojo
Chicago Boyz
Classical Values
*College Insurrection
Confederate Yankee
Jules Crittenden
Daily Pundit
Discriminations
Gregory Djerejian
Daniel W. Drezner
Econlog
Econopundit
Election Law
John Ellis
Engage
Dean Esmay
Gary Farber
Fausta
FiveThirtyEight
Flares into Darkness
Flopping Aces
The Long War Journal
Gateway Pundit
Grasping Reality With Both Hands
Keith Hennessey
Hugh Hewitt
Siflay Hraka
Instapundit
Iowahawk
Joanne Jacobs
Jeff Jarvis
The Jawa Report
Brothers Judd
JustOneMinute
Kausfiles
Kesher Talk
Le-gal In-sur-rec-tion
Little Green Footballs
Megan McArdle
Michelle Malkin
Greg Mankiw
Marginal Revolution
Mazurland
Minding the Campus
The ModerateVoice
*The Monkey Cage Mudville Gazette
"neo-neocon"
Betsy Newmark
Newsbusters
No Watermelons Allowed
Ambra Nykola
*The Optimistic Conservative
The Ornery American
OxBlog
Parapundit
"Patterico"
Daniel Pipes
Polipundit
Political Arithmetik
Political Calculations
Pollster.com
Power and Control
Power Line
Protein Wisdom
QandO
Radio Equalizer
RedState
Riehl World View
Right Wing News
Rightwing Nuthouse
Dr. Sanity
Scrappleface
Screw Loose Change
Linda Seebach
Sense of Events
Joshua Sharf
Rand Simberg
Smart Politics
The Spirit of Enterprise
Stability For Our Time
*Strange Maps
The Strata-Sphere
Andrew Sullivan
Don Surber
Sweetness & Light
Taking Hayek Seriously
TalkLeft
Talking Points Memo
TaxProf
USS Neverdock
VDH's Private Papers
Verum Serum
Villainous Company
Volokh Conspiracy
Washington Monthly
Wizbang
Dr. Weevil
Matt Welch
Winds of Change
Meryl Yourish
zombietime


Canadians:


BlazingCatFur
Colby Cosh
Five Feet of Fury
Kate McMillan
Damian Penny
Bruce Rolston


Latin America:


Babalú
Caracas Chronicles
The Devil's Excrement
Venezuela News and Views


Overseas:


"Franco Aleman"
Bruce Bawer
Biased BBC
Tim Blair
*Andrew Bolt
Peter Briffa
Brussels Journal
Butterflies and Wheels
Crooked Timber
Davids Medienkritik
Egyptian Sand Monkey
EU Referendum
Greenie Watch
Guido Fawkes
Harry's Place
Mick Hartley
Oliver Kamm
JG, Caesarea
*Le Monde Watch
¡No-Pasarán!
Fredrik Norman
Melanie Phillips
*Political Betting
John Ray
samizdata
Shark Blog
Natalie Solent
Somtow's World
Bjørn Stærk
Laban Tall
*David Thompson
Michael Yon

Science Blogs:
The Blackboard
Cliff Mass Weather
Climate Audit
Climate Depot
Climate Science
*Judith Curry
Future Pundit
Gene Expression
The Loom
In The Pipeline
Roger Pielke Jr.
Real Climate
A Voyage To Arcturus
Watts Up With That?

Media Blogs:
Andrew Malcolm
Dori Monson
David Postman
Rhetorical Ammo
Tierney Lab
*White House Dossier

R-Rated:
Horse's A**
Huffington Post

*new



Pseudo-Random Thoughts

Many Lichen Are 3-In-1 Symbiotes, Not 2-In-1:   Lichen are extraordinary, anyway, and this just makes them more so.
Biology textbooks tell us that lichens are alliances between two organisms—a fungus and an alga.  They are wrong.
In many (most?) species, it's two fungi and one alga.

It seems likely, just thinking about it, that this three-way partnership formed in two stages, likely that it began with two, and added another later.

(If somehow you have missed just how tough lichen are, you should read the Wikipedia article.   According to the article, some lichen have both algae and cyanobacteria, which would imply that there are some four-way partnerships.)
- 4:49 PM, 24 July 2016   [link]


Black Lamb And Grey Falcon Reminds Me Too Much Of Today's Problems:  I have been re-reading Rebecca West's masterpiece, and need to take a break from it.

If I want to read about ethnic and religious conflicts, terrorist attacks, and leaders who are not up to the problems they face, all I have to do is check the news regularly; I don't have to read a book about the problems of 1937 Yugoslavia — although we can learn from those problems, if we are willing.
- 1:58 PM, 24 July 2016   [link]


Guido Fawkes Is Shameless For The Picture He Used To Illustrate This Tiny Welsh Scandal:  And I'm shameless for linking to it.

But I do wonder what they were buying at Victoria's Secret.

(Most nations would be delighted if their scandals were that small.)
- 11:10 AM, 24 July 2016   [link]


If You Are Feeling Too Cheerful, this cartoon should fix you up.
- 10:40 AM, 24 July 2016   [link]


Two Kangaroo Tickets:  Two tickets in which the vice presidential candidates would make better presidents than the presidential candidates.

That was my reaction to Hillary Clinton's choice of Tim Kaine as her running mate.

I take it nearly everyone understands why Mike Pence would be better than Donald Trump.  With Tim Kaine it's less obvious, but he is more moderate, and has more and better experience as an executive than Hillary Clinton.  Even better, he isn't surrounded by a cloud of scandals, unlike Hillary "Pig-Pen" Clinton.

(If "kangaroo ticket" is unfamiliar, here's an explanation.)
- 4:31 PM, 23 July 2016   [link]


Anyone Who's Had A Puppy will appreciate this cartoon.
- 3:38 PM, 23 July 2016   [link]


Here's The BBC Story on the Munich shootings.

I have nothing to add, other than the usual reminder that early reports often have errors.
- 3:23 PM, 22 July 2016   [link]


Josh Barro Speculates That Trump Made A Deal With Cruz:  A really stupid deal.
Trump agreed to let Cruz give a prime-time speech without having to promise an endorsement.  I don't know for sure what Trump got in exchange for that, but I have a guess.

Cruz won enough states that he was entitled to have his name entered for nomination, which would have forced a formal floor contest on Tuesday that Trump wished to avoid, even though Trump would have won it.  Cruz didn't enter his name, and Trump gave him a speaking slot without requiring an endorsement.
That's possible, I suppose, though I think a formal floor vote would actually have been to Trump's advantage, since it would have demonstrated the breadth of his support.
- 10:39 AM, 22 July 2016   [link]


Even Funnier Than That Cartoon is this line from Donald Trump:  "Good news is Melania’s speech got more publicity than any in the history of politics especially if you believe that all press is good press!"

Kevin Williamson treats the line seriously, a mistake in my opinion, and so misses the best part of the joke — the stolen lines were about the importance of teaching the values of honesty and hard work.
- 10:14 AM, 22 July 2016   [link]


Yesterday's "Pepper and Salt" is pretty funny.
- 6:53 AM, 22 July 2016   [link]


Stephen Breyer:  A few days ago, a friend and I were trying to remember the eight justices of the Supreme Court   We got up to seven and then neither of us could remember the eighth, although I recalled that he had been appointed by Bill Clinton and that he was a relatively moderate member of the court's liberal wing.

An hour or so later, his name popped into my head, while I was thinking of something else entirely.

This sort of thing happens to all of us from time to time, but we seldom take even a minute to think about how strange it is.

A programmer might say that I had started a background search process, and then, when it completed, it sent an interrupt with the answer.

And if our brains were more like computers, that answer might be roughly right.

But, even in this little example, we can see problems with that analogy.  Unless we consciously train ourselves, most of our memories are not organized in simple, searchable structures.  (We have a few, of course, such as the letters of the alphabet, and memory experts can teach us how to create many others.)

So how did that search operate?  Why did it take so long?  And, did it interrupt as soon as it found the answer, or did it wait for a "good" time?

As far as I know, even now, our brain scientists couldn't answer any of those simple questions, definitively.
- 3:50 PM, 21 July 2016   [link]


Another Trump Scandal: Or, possibly, "scandal".  These accusations could be false.
A woman at the centre of sexual assault allegations against Donald Trump has spoken for the first time in detail about her personal experience with the billionaire tycoon who this week became the Republican nominee for president.

Jill Harth, a makeup artist, has stayed quiet for almost 20 years about the way Trump pursued her, and – according to a lawsuit she instigated – cornered her and groped her in his daughter’s bedroom.

After Trump mounted his campaign for the White House, details emerged of the 1997 complaint, in which Harth accused him of “attempted ‘rape’”.
Having read the article, I see no way to determine which of them is telling the truth, especially at this late date.  But I do have to add that the accusations don't seem implausible.

However, I can make two, tentative predictions:  We are likely to see more new scandal stories about Trump than about Clinton during this campaign, because he hasn't been a public figures in the same way she has.

And we can expect the Trump campaign to fight back by recycling old Clinton scandals for the benefit of younger voters.
- 2:38 PM, 21 July 2016   [link]


What Were Donald Trump And Paul Manafort Thinking?  Why did they invite Ted Cruz to speak, knowing that Cruz was not going to endorse Trump?

I can think of two possible explanations.  First, Trump is so fond of himself that he may have thought that Cruz would finally see how wonderful he is and endorse Trump even though Cruz hadn't promised that he would.

Second, Trump and Manafort liked the idea of provoking a fight, and thought they could injure a rival, thought that it might even help them in the general election.

That isn't how conventional political operatives and politicians would think, but Trump has shown us that the conventional thinking has often been wrong during this election.  Many Trumpistas admire Trump because he appears willing to pick a fight with anyone, any time.

(Here's an interview with Manafort.   I can't say I found it illuminating, but you may have better luck than I did.)
- 10:18 AM, 21 July 2016   [link]


Some Will Admire The Honesty in this cartoon.
- 7:56 AM, 21 July 2016   [link]


Today's "Prickly City" Reminds Us how hard it will be for many voters to judge our Democratic and Republican presidential candidates:   We can't rely on what either of them say, though for different reasons.

As I said in May, I think neo-neocon is roughly right when she says that Clinton is a strategic liar, and Trump is a pathological liar.

So, to judge what Clinton says, we have to think strategically, and ask ourselves whether she thinks she might gain from what she is saying, even if it is false.

For Trump, it's more complicated, because he is not only a pathological liar, but also remarkably ignorant.  He probably wasn't lying when he said the Constitution has twelve articles, and he may not have been lying when he said Saddam Hussein was good at killing terrorists.

But both are still false.

Most voters probably won't go far wrong with this simple rule:  Assume what Trump says is false, unless you have absolute proof, otherwise.

Here's my own set of rules for understanding the man:
  1. Pay almost no attention to what he says now.  (Unless it is really funny.)
  2. Pay a little attention to what he said before he was running for president.
  3. Pay a lot of attention to what he did before he was running for president.
  4. To the extent possible, try to determine his underlying philosophy.   As I said two weeks ago, I think Peter Wehner's op-ed is probably basically correct.
For both candidates, I am using "say" in a very broad way, to include the party platforms, and even symbolic gestures, like picking Mike Pence as a running mate.

(The party platforms probably do give some guide to how members of Congress will act.)
- 2:48 PM, 20 July 2016   [link]


What If The Nominating Rules Were Different (2)?  As I said in my first post, this is mostly for fun.  And because we can learn something from playing with hypothetical scenarios.

This time, suppose both parties used only caucuses to select delegates to the national conventions.  Who would the parties have nominated?  As I said at the end of May, possibly Bernie Sanders and Ted Cruz.

We can see that if we look at who won the states where delegates were selected by caucuses, conventions, or some combination of the two.  A quick check on the Republican side shows that Ted Cruz won Iowa, Alaska, Kansas, Maine, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado, while Donald Trump won Kentucky, Hawaii, and North Dakota.  (Marco Rubio won Minnesota.)

A quick check shows a similar pattern on the Democratic side.  Bernie Sanders won Colorado, Minnesota, Kansas, Nebraska, Maine, Idaho, Utah, Alaska, Hawaii, Washington, Wyoming, and North Dakota, while Hillary Clinton won Iowa and Nevada.

Moreover, this is consistent with what we know about the activists who dominate party caucuses:  They tend to be extreme, even within their own parties, on the far left in the Democratic Party and the far right in the Republican Party.

So, everything else being the same, if the nominations had been decided by caucuses, we might be looking at a Ted Cruz-Bernie Sanders race.

(Would that be better than our current choice?  Tough question.  On the Democratic side, I'm not sure I wouldn't prefer the crook (Hillary) to the fool (Sanders); on the Republican side, there is no doubt that Cruz is better than Trump — but so are at least 90 percent of eligible Americans.

If you are wondering why I am not more positive about Cruz, let me put it this way:   The inability to play well with others is as fatal a defect for a politician as the inability to run is for a sprinter.)
- 8:21 AM, 20 July 2016   [link]


Yesterday's Donald Trump Nomination Was A Disaster For The Republican Party, And The Nation:  But it is a disaster with, so far, many funny aspects.

In yesterday's column, Bret Stephens made a powerful argument against Trump, an argument that I agree with, entirely.  As part of his argument, Stephens quoted these lines:
This week, the same party will nominate as its presidential candidate a man who on Saturday introduced his running mate as follows:

“The turnaround and the strength of Indiana has been incredible, and I learned that when I campaigned there.  And I learned that when I won that state in a landslide.  And I learned that when Gov. Pence, under tremendous pressure from establishment people, endorsed somebody else, but it was more of an endorsement for me, if you remember.  He talked about Trump, then he talked about Ted—who’s a good guy, by the way, who’s going to be speaking at the convention,  Ted Cruz, good guy—but he talked about Trump, Ted, then he went back to Trump. I said, ‘who did he endorse?’ ”
If those were lines delivered by an actor making fun of scatter-brained, narcissistic politicians, you'd smile, maybe even laugh.

Well, even though they were delivered by the Republican nominee, they are still funny, grimly funny in context perhaps, but funny.
- 7:33 AM, 20 July 2016   [link]


Disguises Can Be Useful in many situations.
- 6:21 AM, 20 July 2016   [link]


Archives

June 2002
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October 2002, Part 1 and Part 2
November 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
December 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3

January 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
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January 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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January 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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January 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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January 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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November 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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January 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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August 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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October 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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December 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3. and Part 4

January 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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October 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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June 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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October 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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August 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3and Part 4
December 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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June 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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June 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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January 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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June 2015, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2015, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2016, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3






Coming Soon
  • Plan 17 Conservatives
  • FDR and Waterboarding
  • How Long Do Wars Last?
  • Carbon, Carbon Dioxide, and Crescent Wrenches
  • De-Lawyering and Attorney General McKenna


Coming Eventually
  • JFK and Wiretaps
  • Green Republicans
  • The Rise and Fall and Rise of Black Voting
  • Abortion, Cleft Palates, and Europe
  • Kweisi Mfume's Children
  • Public Opinion During Other US Wars
  • Dual Loyalties
  • The Power Index
  • Baby Dancing
  • Jocks, but no Nerds
  • The Four Caliphs




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