Last updated:
10:27 AM, 25 May 2016



Jim Miller on Politics

  Email:
jimxc1 at gmail.com



What's he reading? Francis Parkman.

News Compilers
(Why These?)

A&L Daily
Drudge
Hot Air
Jewish World Review
Lexis-Nexis
Lucianne
Mediaite
memeorandum
Monsters and Critics
*newser
Orbusmax
Rantburg
Real Clear Politics
SciTech Daily
Yahoo


Big Media
(Why These?)

Atlantic Monthly
BBC
CNN
Chosen Ilbo
*Daily Mail (UK)
*Deutsche Welle
Fox News
Globe and Mail (CA)
Guardian (UK)
Investor's Business Daily
Le Figaro (FR)
Le Monde (FR)
The Local (Sweden)
National Review
New York Times
The New Yorker
Politico
Seattle PI
Seattle Times
Slate
Slashdot
The Spectator (UK)
Der Spiegel
Telegraph (UK)
Times (UK)
El Universal
U. S. News
USA Today
Wall Street Journal
Washington Examiner
Washington Post
Washington Times


References:

Adherents
Bureau of Labor Statistics
Census Quick Facts
Dave Leip's Election Atlas
FactCheck
Federal Statistics
How Stuff Works
NationMaster
Refdesk
Snopes
StateMaster
Tax Facts
Unionstats
Wikipedia


Smart Media
(Why These?)

ABC News Note
*The American
The American Spectator
Michael Barone
City Journal
Commentary
Front Page Magazine
Michael Fumento
The Hill
Media Research
Michael Medved
New York Sun
Number Watch
PJ Media
Public Interest
Roll Call
Spinsanity
Townhall
The Weekly Standard


Blogs
(Why These?)

My Group Blog:
Sound Politics

Northwest:


The American Empire
AndrewsDad
Chief Brief
Clear Fog Blog
Coffeemonkey's weblog
Croker Sack
"DANEgerus"
Economic Freedom
Federal Way Conservative
Freedom Foundation
Hairy Thoughts
Huckleberry Online
Andy MacDonald
NW Republican
Orcinus
Public Interest Transportation Forum
<pudge/*>
Northwest Progressive Institute
*Progressive Majority
Matt Rosenberg
Seattle Blogger
Seattle Bubble
Washington Policy Center
West Sound Politics
Zero Base Thinking


Other US:


Ace of Spades HQ
Alien Corn
Ann Althouse
American Thinker
The Anchoress
Armies of Liberation
Art Contrarian
"Baldilocks"
Balloon Juice
Baseball Crank
La Shawn Barber
Beldar
Bleat
Big Government
Bookworm Room
Broadband Politics
Stuart Buck
Keith Burgess-Jackson
*Bush Center
Chef Mojo
Chicago Boyz
Classical Values
*College Insurrection
Confederate Yankee
Jules Crittenden
Daily Pundit
Discriminations
Gregory Djerejian
Daniel W. Drezner
Econlog
Econopundit
Election Law
John Ellis
Engage
Dean Esmay
Gary Farber
Fausta
FiveThirtyEight
Flares into Darkness
Flopping Aces
The Long War Journal
Gateway Pundit
Grasping Reality With Both Hands
Keith Hennessey
Hugh Hewitt
Siflay Hraka
Instapundit
Iowahawk
Joanne Jacobs
Jeff Jarvis
The Jawa Report
Brothers Judd
JustOneMinute
Kausfiles
Kesher Talk
Le-gal In-sur-rec-tion
Little Green Footballs
Megan McArdle
Michelle Malkin
Greg Mankiw
Marginal Revolution
Mazurland
Minding the Campus
The ModerateVoice
*The Monkey Cage Mudville Gazette
"neo-neocon"
Betsy Newmark
Newsbusters
No Watermelons Allowed
Ambra Nykola
*The Optimistic Conservative
The Ornery American
OxBlog
Parapundit
"Patterico"
Daniel Pipes
Polipundit
Political Arithmetik
Political Calculations
Pollster.com
Power and Control
Power Line
Protein Wisdom
QandO
Radio Equalizer
RedState
Riehl World View
Right Wing News
Rightwing Nuthouse
Dr. Sanity
Scrappleface
Screw Loose Change
Linda Seebach
Sense of Events
Joshua Sharf
Rand Simberg
Smart Politics
The Spirit of Enterprise
Stability For Our Time
*Strange Maps
The Strata-Sphere
Andrew Sullivan
Don Surber
Sweetness & Light
Taking Hayek Seriously
TalkLeft
Talking Points Memo
TaxProf
USS Neverdock
VDH's Private Papers
Verum Serum
Villainous Company
Volokh Conspiracy
Washington Monthly
Wizbang
Dr. Weevil
Matt Welch
Winds of Change
Meryl Yourish
zombietime


Canadians:


BlazingCatFur
Colby Cosh
Five Feet of Fury
Kate McMillan
Damian Penny
Bruce Rolston


Latin America:


Babalú
Caracas Chronicles
The Devil's Excrement
Venezuela News and Views


Overseas:


"Franco Aleman"
Bruce Bawer
Biased BBC
Tim Blair
*Andrew Bolt
Peter Briffa
Brussels Journal
Butterflies and Wheels
Crooked Timber
Davids Medienkritik
Egyptian Sand Monkey
EU Referendum
Greenie Watch
Guido Fawkes
Harry's Place
Mick Hartley
Oliver Kamm
JG, Caesarea
*Le Monde Watch
¡No-Pasarán!
Fredrik Norman
Melanie Phillips
*Political Betting
John Ray
samizdata
Shark Blog
Natalie Solent
Somtow's World
Bjørn Stærk
Laban Tall
*David Thompson
Michael Yon

Science Blogs:
The Blackboard
Cliff Mass Weather
Climate Audit
Climate Depot
Climate Science
*Judith Curry
Future Pundit
Gene Expression
The Loom
In The Pipeline
Roger Pielke Jr.
Real Climate
A Voyage To Arcturus
Watts Up With That?

Media Blogs:
Andrew Malcolm
Dori Monson
David Postman
Rhetorical Ammo
Tierney Lab
*White House Dossier

R-Rated:
Horse's A**
Huffington Post

*new



Pseudo-Random Thoughts


The "Ferguson Effect" Is Real:  So says Heather MacDonald, and she has a pile of new evidence to support her claim.
Federal Bureau of Investigation Director James Comey has again drawn the wrath of the White House for calling attention to the rising violence in urban areas.   Homicides increased 9% in the largest 63 cities in the first quarter of 2016; nonfatal shootings were up 21%, according to a Major Cities Chiefs Association survey.   Those increases come on top of last year’s 17% rise in homicides in the 56 biggest U.S. cities, with 10 heavily black cities showing murder spikes above 60%.
MacDonald defines the Ferguson effect as urban violence resulting from "a falloff in proactive policing".  I would define it somewhat more broadly, and interactively, something like this:  Black neighborhoods have become more hostile to police, and the police have reacted by pulling back from aggressive policing.  As a result, crime has increased in many cities, and soared in a few.

The evidence is now strong enough so that she has won over some critics, notably criminologist Richard Rosenfeld.

Here's how I would summarize what has happened:  Activists have created a false picture of police looking for chances to persecute, or even kill, young black men; the Obama administration legitimized that belief; and our media amplified it,  As a result, crime is up and hundreds have died who might have lived, were it not for that movement, that legitimization, and that amplification.

Naturally those responsible are denying what anyone can see in those numbers.

(Some in our major news organizations may be trying to repair some of the damage they have caused.  Recently, I have been seeing more "nice cop" stories.)
- 10:27 AM, 25 May 2016   [link]


Here's Ramirez's Latest Cartoon, on facebook.

(If you need a bigger dose of Ramirez, you can get it at his site.)
- 7:29 AM, 25 May 2016   [link]


If You Have A Taste For The Absurd, you'll probably like today's New Yorker calendar cartoon.

(I suspect more men than women will like it.)
- 6:47 AM, 25 May 2016   [link]


RoboBees:  They don't look much like bees, do they?

RoboBees

But they can fly, and now researchers have taught them how to perch, like most flying creatures.
They perch one way or another at some time or another.  Many birds grip tree branches, bats hang upside down, and insects land on just about anything.

For robots bigger than the RoboBee, researchers have developed gripping mechanisms, like spikes that shoot into a tree limb or other kind of perch, and aerial anchors that the robot can throw out.

RoboBee scientists came up with an elegant and, necessarily, lightweight solution involving an adhesive patch on the top of the robot.
If you are wondering what use RoboBees might be, eventually, Wikipedia has some possibilities.
The goal of the RoboBee project is to make a fully autonomous swarm of flying robots for applications such as search and rescue and artificial pollination
And I imagine you can think of some military possibilities, without much effort.

How much smaller can researchers go?  I don't know, but networked floating dust motes play an important part in Vernor Vinge's A Deepness in the Sky.  (Vinge is a computer scientist, as well as a science fiction writer.)
- 3:55, 24 May 2016   [link]


More On Donald Trump's "Mandate"  Two weeks ago, I argued that Donald Trump's performance in the primaries and caucuses did not give him a mandate.

In his article, "The Insider", Jay Cost extends that argument.
In fact, Trump has won 41 percent of the primary votes cast to date.  His share of the total primary vote will increase now that he is unopposed, but most—if not all—previous GOP nominees won a larger share than Trump is likely to achieve.  In 2008 John McCain won 47 percent of the Republican primary vote; in 2012 Mitt Romney won 52 percent.  Gerald Ford won 53 percent in 1976, Ronald Reagan 61 percent in 1980, George H.W. Bush 68 percent in 1988, and George W. Bush 63 percent in 2000.  Trump could still eke out a slightly larger share of primary votes than McCain did, but only if there is large turnout in the handful of remaining contests.  In all likelihood, he will be the least-popular nominee in the modern era.
(Emphasis added.)

Bob Dole received 59 percent of the popular vote in 1996, if you were wondering.

And those cheering crowds at Trump rallies? —Trump's supporters are intense but not, by modern standards, especially numerous.

(In the rest of the article, Cost argues that Trump's success owes much to media elites, and to party elites who set up rules intended to make a quick choice of a nominee more likely.)
- 2:06 PM, 24 May 2016   [link]


Andy Kessler Starts His Speech To Graduates with some examples of what not to say.
Debt-laden graduates, affluent alumni, birds-of-a-feather faculty and tuition-burdened parents:  I’m sorry.

I’m sorry that I won’t be sucking up to you with the same old graduation platitudes.  You should have invited Oprah:  “How do you know when you’re doing something right?  How do you know that?  It feels so.”  Or Michael Dell:  “The key is to listen to your heart and let it carry you in the direction of your dreams.”  Or Hillary Clinton:   “Give it your all.  Dare to be all you can be.”

Those are so vapid as to be meaningless—and you young’uns need real advice.   So unscrunchie your man-buns, stop posting anonymous snark on YikYak, and listen up.
(When I saw that quote from Michael Dell, literal fellow that I am, I immediately asked these questions:  But what if your auricles and ventricles disagree, as they usually do?  And how can a pump carry you somewhere?)

Those quotes would be even funnier if we didn't know that the speakers were being paid big money to say those things.

The rest of what Kessler has to say is the kind of practical advice that graduates often need.

(For advice on how the graduates should live their lives, it's hard to beat what Clarence Thomas said.)
- 9:47 AM, 24 May 2016   [link]


Today's New Yorker Hillary Cartoon is just okay, but yesterday's Trump cartoon is pretty funny

(Note on terminology:  For years, I have been calling cartoons from my daily calendar "today's cartoon", not realizing that the New Yorker actually had a daily cartoon at their site.  From now on, I'll say "calendar", if that is where I get a cartoon.

Incidentally, for years I have believed that starting the work day with a cartoon or joke was a good idea, that it made me more productive.  Sadly, I have no evidence for that belief, other than my feelings.)
- 8:55 AM, 24 May 2016   [link]


Justin Trudeau Gets Physical:  With a female member of the Canadian parliament.

Well, he "identifies as a feminist", so the Canadian Prime Minister might have elbowed a male MP, in just the same way.

(Canadians haven't lost their sense of humor.)
- 4:18 PM, 23 May 2016   [link]


More On Trump's Temporary Polling Advantage:  Four days ago, I argued that Donald Trump had a temporary advantage over Hillary Clinton because he no longer had an active opponent.

Now Philip Bump is making the same argument.
As it stands, registered voters prefer Trump by a narrow two-point margin.

But that figure is probably a bit misleading.  No one is actively running against Trump. Clinton is still being challenged by Bernie Sanders, whose vocal base of young voters continues to hope that he’ll defy the odds between now and the convention.  Republicans who were leaning against Trump while he was still battling for the nomination have, largely, fallen in line.  Democrats who don’t want to vote for Clinton haven’t.
But more extensively, and with an annotated graph from 2008, to illustrate the point.

(Nonetheless, it is still true that Trump has been gaining on Clinton among British bettors, during this last week.)
- 3:49 PM, 23 May 2016   [link]


Scylla Or Charybdis, Medusa Or The Erymanthian Boar, Evita Or Hugo, Hillary Or Donald:  There are no good choices in those pairs, are there?

But I have been thinking about what those who are dissatisfied with that last pair should do, in the rest of this year, and afterward.  And I hope to say something useful on those subjects, soon.

(I put up that list of pairs so you can tell which is which; for instance, in the second pair, it should be obvious that Donald Trump is the boar.   (For Charybdis I am using the traditional "whirlpool" definition.)

Perhaps I haven't been following popular culture closely enough, but I don't know whether Clinton is Kang pr Kodos, whether Trump is the Alien or the Predator, or which one is the pack of wolverines.)
- 1:28 PM, 23 May 2016   [link]


"What If Clinton Gets Indicted?"  Karl Rove asks that question, and provides tentative answers.

Here's how he begins his speculative column:
Despite losing the Oregon primary while barely eking out a win in Kentucky, Hillary Clinton emerged with 51 of Tuesday’s delegates to Bernie Sanders’s 55.  To reach the 2,383 needed for the nomination, Mrs. Clinton now needs only 92 of either the 890 still-to-be-elected delegates or the 148 still-unpledged superdelegates.   This is because she is already supported by 524 superdelegates—the Democratic Party’s unelected overclass—to Mr. Sanders’s 40.

Still, she must be concerned about losing the FBI primary.  If the bureau recommends that the Justice Department indict Mrs. Clinton or close aides like Cheryl Mills, Huma Abedin or Jake Sullivan for acting with gross negligence—disregard of known or easily anticipated risks—in sending classified information over a private email server, the campaign could be completely scrambled.
(You can use the usual Google search trick to read the rest of the article at the Journal.)

His speculations seem reasonable to me, though, as I've said, I think the FBI will delay any decision until after the election.

(This wouldn't affect the election, but it occurs to me that — if Clinton loses the general election — the FBI might decide that would be a good time to recommend an indictment.  That would dump the problem in Loretta Lynch's lap, in time for President Obama to offer Clinton a pardon, if he wanted to.)
- 10:46 AM, 23 May 2016   [link]


Steven Hayward's Weekly Collection of pictures.

Some are quite good; one has a serious factual error.  Here's a correction:
In 1973, the Justice Department sued the Trump Management Corporation for alleged racial discrimination, which Trump's company disputed.  The corporation was charged with quoting different rental terms and conditions to blacks and making false "no vacancy" statements to blacks for apartments they managed in Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island.[474]  In response, Trump sued the government for $100 million, asserting that the charges were irresponsible and baseless.[475]  The ensuing countersuit was thrown out of court.[47]  The corporation settled out of court in 1975 and did not admit guilt, but promised not to discriminate against minorities.  In addition, the corporation was required to send a bi-weekly list of vacancies to the New York Urban League, a civil rights group and give them priority for certain locations.[476]  In 1978, the Justice Department sued Trump Management in Brooklyn for not satisfying the requirements of the 1975 settlement following allegations of discriminatory housing practices; Trump denied the charges and there is no indication that the Justice Department's suit was successful.[47][477]
There is other, more recent evidence on that question,  If you are curious, look for articles on Trump's long-time butler, Anthony Senecal.

(Were Trump and his father guilty of racial discrimination?  Almost certainly, I would say, given the evidence, and the strong financial incentives they would have had to discriminate.

Incidentally, Trump's father had had other run-ins with the law.)
- 8:56 AM, 23 May 2016   [link]


You Don't See Typos in cartoon captions very often.
- 8:10 AM, 23 May 2016   [link]


Turns Out We Do Know Something about some of Donald Trump's federal income tax returns.
The last time information from Donald Trump’s income-tax returns was made public, the bottom line was striking:  He had paid the federal government $0 in income taxes.

The disclosure, in a 1981 report by New Jersey gambling regulators, revealed that the wealthy Manhattan investor had for at least two years in the late 1970s taken advantage of a tax-code provision popular with developers that allowed him to report negative income.
The rest of the article is interesting, but I should warn you that you may get dizzy trying to follow Trump's twists and turns on this subject.

(I've read that big real estate developers can often exploit special provisions in the tax code to avoid taxes — and that's all I know about the subject.)
- 3:51 PM, 22 May 2016   [link]


Google Isn't The Only Tech Firm Behaving Badly:  So is Twitter.
Silicon Valley’s hostility to U.S. intelligence and law enforcement reached a new low last week when Twitter rejected the Central Intelligence Agency as a customer for data based on its tweets—while continuing to serve an entity controlled by Vladimir Putin.
Presumably the two decisions were made independently, but they sure look bad, when juxtaposed.

The CIA had been working with a Twitter subsidiary, Datminr, for two years, with, as far as I know, no problems.
- 2:42 PM, 22 May 2016   [link]


Google's Latest Pin-Up Girl Wouldn't Be My First Choice:  Okay, she's more a poster girl than a pin-up girl, but she still wouldn't be my first choice.
On Thursday Google unveiled an astonishingly controversial choice of Google doodle, the whimsical temporary alteration the homepage logo that hundreds of millions of people load each day.  Go to Google’s homepage and you’ll see the funky horn-rimmed spectacles of Yuri Kochiyama, a Japanese-American activist who befriended Malcolm X and was iconically photographed cradling her dying friend after he was shot on February 21, 1965.

Then she joined the black separatist group known as the New Republic of Africa, advocated for the blood-soaked Peruvian Marxist terrorist movement known as Shining Path, defended multiple convicted cop-killers, and praised Osama bin Laden as “one of the people I admire… I thank Islam for bin Laden.”
(I assume she's no longer featured on their home page.)

There are times when I think that Google's political philosophy can be summed up as follows:  The company is opposed to "truth, justice, and the American way".   That's probably too strong, but it isn't a bad summary of Ms. Kochiyama's philosophy.

Oh, and Google isn't the only one who thinks she deserves praise; so does the Obama White House (among others).
- 1:50 PM, 22 May 2016   [link]


Where Do Opera Singers Get Their Love Of Opera?   Some from Bugs Bunny cartoons.
Many of the people involved in the Washington National Opera’s production of Richard Wagner's Ring Cycle say their first exposure to opera came from the same source—Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd cartoons.
- 8:10 AM, 22 May 2016   [link]


"Deja Vu, All Over Again"  Last week was odd, because I kept getting confirmations, or at least support, for arguments I had made, earlier.

On 9 May, I said Donald "40 percent" Trump was acting as if he had a mandate; a day later Trump was using the word.

On 18 March, I said that giving ISIS prisoners to our Iraqi allies would pose security and human rights problems; on 11 May, the New York Times published an article noting those human rights problems (but missing the security problems).  (If only there was a safe place to put these prisoners of war.)

On 20 April, I agreed that it was unlikely that Hillary Clinton would be indicted before the election; on 11 May, FBI Director James Comey said the inquiry "won't be rushed".

And it hasn't stopped happening.  On 6 May I said that Donald Trump would have a hard time fund raising for the general election; today, the Times reports that top donors are shifting their money to House and Senate races.

(If I thought there was any causality in this pattern, I'd be making more optimistic predictions.)
- 2:43 PM, 21 May 2016   [link]


Google Searches Often Fail:  But you would think they would have gotten this one right.

(I checked so you don't have to; Google is currently displaying the wrong flag — surrounded by a number of correct images.  Bing had twelve correct images in its image search.)
- 10:26 AM, 21 May 2016   [link]


Golfers Will Like this cartoon.  (Non-golfers may need an explanation.)

(Don't know how long the link will work, since I am linking to the site, not the individual cartoon.)
- 10:00 AM, 21 May 2016   [link]


Archives

June 2002
July 2002
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September 2002
October 2002, Part 1 and Part 2
November 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
December 2002, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3

January 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
February 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
March 2003, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3
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January 2004, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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January 2005, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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January 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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December 2006, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2007, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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January 2008, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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January 2009, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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January 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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October 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2010, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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January 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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August 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2011, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
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August 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3and Part 4
December 2012, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2013, , Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2013, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4
March 2014, Part 1. Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2014, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
June 2015, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
July 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
August 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
September 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
October 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
November 2015, Part 1 Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
December 2015, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4

January 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
February 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
March 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
April 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4
May 2016, Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4






Coming Soon
  • Plan 17 Conservatives
  • FDR and Waterboarding
  • How Long Do Wars Last?
  • Carbon, Carbon Dioxide, and Crescent Wrenches
  • De-Lawyering and Attorney General McKenna


Coming Eventually
  • JFK and Wiretaps
  • Green Republicans
  • The Rise and Fall and Rise of Black Voting
  • Abortion, Cleft Palates, and Europe
  • Kweisi Mfume's Children
  • Public Opinion During Other US Wars
  • Dual Loyalties
  • The Power Index
  • Baby Dancing
  • Jocks, but no Nerds
  • The Four Caliphs




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The Unknown Bush


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Uncorrected Mistakes


Vote Fraud


The Gang of Four


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Chomsky Cult Program


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